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Full text of "Undergraduate Catalog / University of Maryland, College Park, 2012-2013"

Undergraduate Catalog 2012/2013 



AbouttheCa&og Page2 



About theCatalog 

Welcome to the University of Maryland Undergraduate Catalog website. The Undergraduate Catalog 
provi des i nf ormati on pertai ni ng to undergraduate acaderri c programs, i ncl udi ng course descri pti ons 
and program requi rements, and sets forth the university's academic, registration and graduation 
pol icies and regulations. A I isti ng of U ni versity of M aryland pol icies and procedures is avai lable at 
http://www. presi dent, umd.edu/pol i ci es/. Program requi rements contai ned i n the U ndergraduate 
Catal og supersede any i nf ormati on whi ch may be contai ned i n any bulletin of any school or 
department. Thi s U ndergraduate Catal og al so contai ns hyperl i nks to other i nf ormati onal resources at 
the University of Maryland. The information contained in these hyperlinks is provided as a 
conveni ence to the reader and i s not part of the U ndergraduate Catal og itself . 

The provi si ons of the U ndergraduate Catal og are not to be regarded as a contract between the 
student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to change its policies, 
rules, regulations, requi rements for graduation, course offerings, tuition, fees, other charges, or any 
other contents of thi s catal og at any ti me. 

C hanges are effected from ti me to ti me i n the general pol i ci es, and acaderri c and graduati on 
requi rements. The U ndergraduate Catal og wi 1 1 be updated to ref I ect such changes, as appropri ate, but 
updates may not appear i mmedi atd y . There are establ i shed procedures for maki ng changes that 
protect the i nsti tuti on's i ntegri ty and the i ndi vi dual students i nterest and wd fare. A curri cul um or 
graduati on requi remert, when al tered, i s not normal I y retroacti ve unl ess the change i s to the 
students' advantage and can be accommodated withi n the span of years normal I y requi red for 
graduation. 



Publications 

Underg-aduate Catalog: The current undergraduate catal og, and previ ous editi ons, are avai I abl e on 

this site. 

Graduate Catalog The graduate catalog is avai lable onl i ne at: www. gradschool .umd.edu/catalog. 

For additional i nf ormati on, cal I 301-314-4198. 

Registration Guide: The regi strati on gui de ourJ i nes regi strati on dates and procedures, and provi des 

i nf ormati on on deadl i nes, fees, and other studetn services at the university. 

The regi strati on gui de and schedul e of cl asses are avai I abl e at 
www.testudo.umd.edu/SclieduleOfClasse5.html . 



A bout the University 



Page 3 



About the University 

Campus Administration and Deans 

College Park Administration 

Wallace L oh President 

Aim G . Wylie Seni or V i ce Presi dent and Provost 

L i nda C lement V i ce Presi dent for Student Aff ai rs 

Robert M . Specter, V i ce Presi dent for A drri ni strati ve Aff ai rs 

Patrick O' Shea, V i ce Presi dent for Research 

Peter Wei ler, V i ce Presi dent for U ni versi ty Rd ati ore 

Brian D. Voss, V i ce Presi dent for I nf ormati on Technol ogy 

College Park Administrative Deans 

Donna B. Hamilton, Associ ate Provost for Acaderri c Affai rs and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

Patricia A. Steele, Dean of Libraries 

Siba Samal, Associ ate Dean, Col I ege of Veteri nary M edi ci ne, M aryl and Campus 

Charles A. Caramel I o Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School 



Academic Calendar 2012-2013 



Fall Semester 2012 

First Day of Classes 
Labor Day 
Thanksgiving Recess 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading Day 

Final Exams 

Commencement - M ai n Ceremony 

Corrrnencement - Col I ege/Department Ceremoni es 

Winter Term 2013 

Classes Begin 

Dr. Martin Luther King Holiday 

Classes End 



August 29 
(Wednesday) 

September 3 (M onday) 

November 22-25 
(Thursday-Sunday) 

December 11 
(Tuesday) 

December 12 
(Wednesday) 

December 13-19 
(Thursday-Wednesday) 

December 19 
(Wednesday) 

December 20 
(Thursday) 



J anuary 2 (Wednesday) 
J anuary 21 (M onday) 
J anuary 22 (Tuesday) 



A bout the University 



Page 4 



Spring Semester 2013 

First Day of Classes 

Spring Break 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading Day 

Final Exams 

Senior Day 

Cornmencement - M ai n Ceremony 

Commencement - Col I ege/Department 
Ceremonies 



J anuary 23 (Wednesday) 

March 17-24 (Sunday-Sunday) 

May 9 (Thursday) 

May 10 (Friday) 

May 11-17 (Saturday- Friday) 

May 18 (Saturday) 

May 19 (Sunday) 

M ay 19 (Sunday) and M ay 20 (M onday) 



Summer Term 2013 

Sessions I and I -A Begin 
Session I -A Ends 
Session I -B Begins 
I independence Day H ol i day 
Sessions I andl-B End 
Sessions 1 1 and 1 1 -C Begin 
Session 1 1 -C Ends 
Session 1 1 -D Begins 
Sessions 1 1 and 1 1 -D End 



May 28 (Tuesday) 
June 14 (Friday) 
June 17 (Monday) 
J uly 4 (Thursday) 
July 5 (Friday) 
J uly 8 (Monday) 
J uly 26 (Friday) 
J uly 29 (Monday) 
August 16 (Friday) 



All dates are potentially subject to change. 

F uture acaderri c cal endars can be vi ewed at www. provost. umd.edu/cal endar/ 



Accreditation 



The University of Maryland, College Park is accredited by the M iddle States Commission on Higher 
Educati on ( MSCHE ). under the authority of the U .S. Department of Educati on. I n additi on, 
i ndi vidual col leges, schools, and departments are accredited by a number of other groups: 

Accreditors Approved by U.S. Secretary of Education: American Association for Marriage and 
Family Therapy, Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education ; 
American Dietetic Association, Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education ; American 
Psychological Association, Committee on Accreditation ; American Speech- Language- Hearing 



AbouttheUniversity Page5 



Association, Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech- Language Pathology ; 
American Veterinary Medical Association, Council on Education ; Council on Education for Public 
Health; National Association of Schools of Music, Commission on Accreditation; National Council 
for Accreditation of Teacher Education; Commission on English Language Program Accreditation. 

Other Accreditors Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB); Institute of Food 
Technologists; National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB); Planning Accreditation Board; 
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business; American Library Association (ALA); 
Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE); Council on Rehabilitation Education; Council 
for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP); Accreditation Board 
of Engi neeri ng and Technology (ABET); Accrediti ng Counci I on Education on J ournal ism and M ass 
Communications (ACEJMC); National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. 
M aster of A rchi tecture program val i dated, not accredi ted, by the Royal Soci ety of A rchi tects. 

Evaluated Rather Than Accredited: 

M aryland Sea Grant Col lege (National Sea Grant Review Panel ), Water Resources Center (U nited 

States Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey). 

For more information about Accreditation see http://www.ms07.umd.edu/ 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 6 

L Requirements and Application Procedures 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

The University of M aryland is a publicly funded land grant i nstitution and thef lagshi p of the 
University System of Maryland. The University's Mission Statement expresses a commitment to 
achi evi ng excel I ence as the state's pri mary center for research and graduate educati on and the 
i nsrj tuti on of choi ce for undergraduate students of excepti onal ability and prorni se. Consi stent wi th 
thi s m i ssi on, the U ni versi ty counts the di versi ty of its students among i ts greatest strengths and as 
an i ntegral component of the educati onal process and acaderri c excel I ence. 
The undergraduate adrri ssi on process, whi ch ref I ects the U ni versi ty's educati onal rri ssi on, seeks to 
i denti f y those appl i cants, who as i ndi vi dual s and as a group, wi 1 1 enri ch and benef i t from the campus 
I earni ng envi ronment, and thus benefit the enti re student body. The process i s structured to build 
enteri ng cl asses of students whose vari ed backgrounds and experi ences provi de substanrj al evi dence 
of their potential to: 

1. M eet the university's requi rements for academic success. 

2. Enrich the university as a heterogeneous community. 

3. Add new perspectives to the university's curricul um and scholarly pursuits. 

4. Devd op personal skills, incl udi ng I eadershi p, self -corf i dence, and i ntd I ectual engagement. 

5. Contribute to the intellectual, cultural, social and political life of the university, state, and nation. 
A s the uni versi ty must make f i ne di sti ncti ons among I arge numbers of hi ghl y qual i f i ed appl i cants, 
the abi I i ty to assess consi stentl y al I i nf ormati on presented i n the appl i cati on becomes i ncreasi ngl y 

i important. Therefore, the uni versi ty empl oys a ri gorous revi ew process that engages the experti se of 
prof essi onal educators i n perf orrri ng i ndi vi dual i zed and hoi i sti c eval uati ons of each appl i cati on. 
Each appl i cant i s assessed on the basi s of achi evements and potenti al i n a broad range of acaderri c 
categori es, vi ewed i n the context of the opportuniti es and chal I enges the appl i cant faced. 
These categori es i ncl ude 

1. Strength of educational performance, as measured by the nature and rigor of high school 
curri cul um and acaderri c achi evements. 

2. Potential for col lege success, as evidenced by perf ormance on nationally normed standardized 
tests. 

3. Potential to promote beneficial educational outcomes and to make a positive contri bution to 
campus and community I ife 

4. Persistence, and comrritmentto educational excellence, as evidenced by demonstrated success in 
faci ng adversity and overcorri ng obstacl es. 

Application Forms 

The undergraduate appl i cati on forms may be compl eted and submitted onl i ne vi a the web at www.adn 

www.adrrissions.umd.edu 

Fall Semester Freshman Admission 

The University of Maryland strongly encourages all applicants to apply by our November 1 priority 
appl i cati on deadl i ne to assure best consi derati on for adrri ssi on, meri t schol arshi ps, and i nvi tati on to 
the H onors Col I ege or Col I ege Park Schol ars. A drri ssi on to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and i s 
competitive. Wetypically receive more than 26,000 appl i cati ons for a fall freshman class 
of approximately 4,000. Asaresult, we are unable to offer adrri ssi on to all students who have the 
ability to be acaderri cal I y successful at M aryl and . A compl eted appl i cati on i ncl udes an appl i cati on 
form official high school transcript, SAT I or ACT scores, essays and activity statement, guidance 
counsel or and teacher recommendati on forms and appl i cati on fee. 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 7 



Applyi ng by the November 1 priority deadl ineis encouraged. For updated deadl i ne i nf ormation, 
pi ease visit: www.adrnissions.urnd.edu/apply/appl i cati ondeadl i nes.cf m Because of space 
I i rri tati ons, the uni versi ty i s unabl e to offer admi ssi on to al I qual i f i ed appl i cants. 
Spring Semester Freshman Admission 

Students may be adrri tied for the spri ng semester by appl y i ng di recti y for spri ng admi ssi on or by 
havi ng the r f al I appl i cati on i denti f i ed for spri ng adrri ssi on through the appl i cati on revi ew process 
(as a result of space I i imitations). I n addition, appl icati ons received after the priority deadl i ne date 
wi 1 1 be consi dered on a rol I i ng, space-avai I abl e basi s. A compl eted appl i cati on i ncl udes an 
appl icati on form official high school transcript, SAT I or ACT scores, essays and activities, 
gui dance counsel or and teacher recomrnendati on forms and the appl i cati on fee. 

Applying by the priority deadl ineis encouraged. For updated deadline information, please visit: 

www.adrrissions.umd.edu/apply/appl icati ondeadl i nes.cfm . 

Financial Aid Applications 

The priority deadline for Financial Aid is February 15. Students seeking financial assistance should 

compl ete the FA F SA before recei vi ng thei r I etter of admi ssi on. M ore i nf ormati on i s avai I abl e about 

Financial Aid in Chapter 2. 

Early Admission Options for High-Achieving Higji School Students 

Concurrent Enrollment Talented high school seniors have the opportunity to enrol I at the 

U ni versi ty of M aryl and for two courses, or seven credi ts, each semester. Successful appl i cants wi 1 1 

have pursued a ri gorous hi gh school program and wi 1 1 have i ndi cated excepti onal performance and 

ability achi eved over ti me. To appl y, students must submit: the compl eted appl i cati on and fee; hi gh 

school transcri pt; an essay expl ai ni ng why they are i nterested i n the program a I etter of 

recomrnendati on from the hi gh school ; and a I etter of perrri ssi on from the parents or guardi an. 

Students must live within commuting distance. Tuition is assessed on a per-credit-hour basis. All 

mandatory fees appl y i n f ul I . 

Summer Enrollment High school students with a strong high school record may be consi dered for 

enrol I ment i n courses duri ng the summer precedi ng thei r j uni or or seni or year. They must f i I e a 

regul ar appl i cati on for undergraduate adrri ssi on, i ncl udi ng an off i ci al hi gh school transcri pt. Tuiti on 

is assessed on a per-credit-hour basis. All mandatory fees apply i n f ul I . For more i information, 

students shoul d vi si t the Off i ce of Extended Studi es on the web at www.oes.umd.edu . 

Application Deadlines: 

Spring: January 2 

Summer: Mayl 

Fall: August 1 

Early Admission: Although the Uni versity of M aryl and general ly requi res appl icants to earn a high 

school di ploma prior to thei r f i rst f ul l-ti me registration, the university wi 1 1 admit a I i rrited number of 

wd I -qual if i ed students without hi gh school di pi omas. Successful appl i cants wi 1 1 have pursued a 

ri gorous hi gh school program and wi 1 1 have i ndi cated excepti onal performance and ability achi eved 

over ti me. Students must be withi n two credits of hi gh school graduati on and have the commitment 

of the hi gh school to award a di pi oma after successful compl eti on of the freshman year at 

M aryl and. To apply, students must submit: the completed appl icati on and fee, high school transcri pt 

and SAT I or A CT resul ts, an essay expl ai ni ng how they wi 1 1 benef i t from the program a I etter of 

perrri ssi on from the parents or guardi an and a I etter of support from the hi gh school wni ch detai I s 

the school 's agreement to award the hi gh school di pi oma. Earl y adrri ssi on students are d i gi bl e for 

on-campus housing, scholarships based on academic achievement, the Honors College, and College 

Park Scholars. Early application is strongly advised. 

Higji School Equivalency Examination (GED) 

M aryl and resi dents who are at I east 16 years of age and who have not reed ved a hi gh school 

di pi oma may be consi dered for adrri ssi on provi ded they have earned the hi gh school General 



1. Requi rerments and Applicati on Procedures Pa 9 e 8 



Education Equivalency (GED) certificate. I n order to be considered for admission, the appl icant 

must submit a compl eted appl i cati on (i ncl udi ng SAT I scores if the appl i cant has been out of hi gh 

school for I ess than three years) and present an above average total score as wd I as above average 

scores on each of the f i ve parts of the test. 

NavAccredited/NavApjproved High School 

Students from non-accredited/non-approved high schools who seek admission to the University of 

M ary I and shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons for i nf ormati on. 

Home-Schooled Students 

H ome-school ed appl i cants shoul d meet the same mi ni mum hi gh school course requi rerrents 

expected of al I appl i cants. Additi onal i nf ormati on from home-school ed students i s requi red i n the 

f ol I owi ng areas of the appl i cati on: 

Transcript shoul d provi de course descri pti ons, books used, methods of eval uati on, and 
the grades recei ved, as wd I as a statement provi di ng general i nf ormati on about the 
home-school curri cul um If col I ege- 1 evd courses have been taken si mul taneousl y an 
off i ci al col I ege transcri pt shoul d be i ncl uded wi th the appl i cati on. 

Letters of Reoonmaidation: the University of Maryland requi res two recommendations 
from al I freshman appl i cants. I n the case of home-school ed students these 
recommendations should be provided by 1) an individual acting in a supervisory or 
eval uati ve capacity with regard to the student's curri cul um and 2) from a teacher i n any 
setting (home-school program, community col I ege course, etc.). 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CREDIT 

The University of Maryl and encourages appl i cants to seek A P credit so that academically successful 
students may move forward i n thd r programs at an appropriate pace. However, credit is not granted 
for al I exams offered by the Col I ege Board. Credits are accepted and courses are exempted, based on 
departmental approval , accordi ng to the chart bd ow. Students shoul d arrange to have thd r scores 
sent di recti y to the University of Maryl and from the Educational Testing Service; the code is 5814. 
Students should also i nform thd r advisors at Orientation that they antici pate reed vi ng AP credit 
because thi s i nf ormati on may affect thd r pi acement i n subj ect- matter courses. 

If a student has already recdved AP credit at another institution, this credit will be reevaluated. The 
score reed ved must be equi val ent to the mi ni mum score the U ni versi ty of M ary I and accepted at the 
ti me the test was taken; otherwi se, the credit wi 1 1 not be d i gi bl e for transfer. A P credits that are 
accepted are recorded as transfer credi t on U ni versi ty of M ary I and records and f i gure i n the total 
number of credits earned toward graduation. Students may not recdve AP credit for an equivalent 
course taken at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and or d sewhere. I f students earn credi t i n a course 
equi val ent to an A P exam for which they also earned credit, theAP credit will be dd eted from thd r 
records. Students shoul d check wi th thd r advi sors for detai I ed i nf ormati on on the assi gnment of A P 
credit. 

PI ease note that the chart represents a general outi i ne of A P credit. I n al I cases, credit i s avai I abl e 
onl y for grades of 3 or hi gher, subj ect to ongoi ng departmental reeval uati on. A 1 1 departments reserve 
the ri ght to reeval uate the content of exams and to change the assi gnment of credit and course 
equivalencies. Any new exams offered after February 15 may or may not be eval uated by the 
appropri ate department. Students shoul d check with thd r advi sor at Ori entati on. 

Certain departments, particularly Mathematics and Physics, have separate criteria for placement in 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 9 



courses and the assi gnment of credit. Students shoul d check with those departments for additi onal 
i nf ormati on. A 1 1 enteri ng freshmen will be pi aced i n math courses accordi ng to the U ni versi ty of 
M ary I and math pi acement exam 

To seethe 2012-2013 University of Maryland Advanced Placement (AP) Exams and Credit 
Tablegota www, umd.edu/catal oa/attachments/A P. pdf 



INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE EXAMS (IB) AND CREDIT TABLE 

2012-2013 

The U ni versi ty of M aryl and awards credit to students who sit for I nternati onal Baccal aureate exams 

according to the table below. TheUniversity retrieves scores from the I nternati onal Baccalaureate 

Organization; students may request that their scores be released to the University at 

www. i bo.org/i bna/graduates/. I nterested students shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 

Admissions for additi onal information. Note Credit awards and course equivalencies are subject to 

change. 

To seethe 2012-2013 1 nternational Baccalaureate Exams (I B) and C redit Tablego toe 

www, umd.edu/catal oa/attachments/l B , pdf . 



ADMISSION TO LIMITED ENROLLMENT PROG RAMS(LEP) 

Certai n col I eges, school s, and departments wi thi n the uni versi ty have taken steps to limit enrol I ment 
i n order to mai ntai n qual ity programs. These i ncl ude the School of A rchitecture, PI anni ng and 
Preservation, Robert H . Smith School of Busi ness, A . J aires Clark School of Engi neeri ng, Phi I i p 
Merrill Col lege of Journalism Department of Biological Sciences, Department of Biochemistry, 
Chemistry and Environmental Sciences and Pol icy- Biodiversity and Conservation, Department 
of Communi cati on, Department of Cri rri nol ogy, Department of Government and Pol itics, 
Department of Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture and Department of 
Psychol ogy. L E P programs are conti nual I y revi ewed. Students shoul d check the L E P websi te at 
www.lep.umd.edu or contact the Coordi nator of Li rri ted Enrol I ment Programs at 301-314-8385 for 
updated i nf ormati on. 

Freshmen: Admission for new freshmen to Li rri ted Enrol I ment Programs is competitive. Because 
space may be I i rri ted for a parti cul ar maj or, earl y appl i cati on i s encouraged. F reshmen who are 
di recti y adrri tted to an L E P wi 1 1 be subj ect to a performance revi ew when they compl ete 45 col I ege 
credits. The revi ew vari es from program to program but al ways i ncl udes sati sfactory performance i n 
a set of appropri ate courses. Students not passi ng the revi ew wi 1 1 be requi red to choose another 
maj or. See the acaderri c program descri pti on for specif i c detai I s. 

Freshmen not di recti y admitted to an LEP may be assigned to Letters and Sciences. Students are not 
guaranteed adrri ssi on to an L E P at a I ater date, al though they may gai n adrri ssi on by meeti ng the 
requi rements outi i ned i n thei r parti cul ar program by the ti me they compl ete 45 or 60 credits at 
M aryl and. See the f ol I owi ng secti on on L E P transfer adrri ssi on and the L E P program descri pti ons 
for further detai I s about thi s opti on. 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 10 



Transfers Transfer students and on-campus students wi shi ng to change thei r maj or to an L E P must 
meet a set of gateway courses with rri ni mum grades i n order to be admitted to the program Space i s 
limited in each program and the most qual if i ed appl i cants wi 1 1 be admitted each semester. 
A ddi ti onal i nf ormati on for each of the L i rri ted E nrol I ment Programs may be found i n the 
descri pti ons of academi c maj ors i n chapter 7. 

Transfer students who are not di rectly adrrissi ble to an LEP upon appl ication to the university wi 1 1 
be assigned to an alternate program Those with fewer than 60 credits wi 1 1 be assigned to Letters and 
Sci ences, and wi 1 1 be al I owed the opportunity to meet the gateway requi rements by the ti me they 
compl ete 45 or 60 credi ts. Students wi th more than 60 credi ts wi 1 1 be adrri tied to an i nteri m advi si ng 
program i n Letters and Sci ences where they wi 1 1 be advi sed regardi ng thei r qual if i cati ons for the 
LEP and, i n some cases, students need to choose another maj or. 

Second Major: Enrolled students interested in adding an LEP as a second major should see "Degree 
Requi rements" i n chapter 4. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

While professional schools do not require, favor, or prefer specific majors, pre- professional advisors 
can provi de gui dance concerni ng the choi ce of maj or. U ndeci ded students may enter Letters and 
Sci ences, but must adhere to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and pol i cy, that students ded are a 
degree-granti ng major by the ti me they reach 60 credits. See www.ltsc.umd.edu . 

For further information on pre-professi onal programs, see "Other for Credit Programs" in Chapter 7, 
www.prdaw.umd.edu or www.prehealth.umd.edu . 



SPECIAL APPLICANTS 

Golden Identification Card Program 

The U ni versity of M aryl and parti ci pates i n the Gol den I dentif i cati on Card Program. The institution 
wi 1 1 make avai I abl e courses and vari ous servi ces to persons who are 60 years of age or ol der, who 
are I egal resi dents of the State of M aryl and and who are red red ( not engaged i n gai nf ul empl oyment 
for more than 20 hours per week) . When persons d i gi bl e for thi s program are admitted to the 
university, they register on a space-avai I able basis for credit courses as regular or special students i n 
any session and reed ve a Golden I dentif ication card. Golden I D students must meet al I course 
prerequisite and co-requisite requi rements. Tuition is waived for these courses; however, a Golden 
I D administrative fee is assessed every semester. Golden I D students may register for a maximum of 
three courses per term Gol den I D students are not d i gi bl e for Consorrj um courses. The Gol den 
I dentif ication Card wi 1 1 entitle d igi ble persons to certai n academic services, i nd udi ng the use of the 
I i brari es and the shutrj e bus servi ce. Such servi ces wi 1 1 be avai I abl e duri ng any sessi on onl y to 
persons who have regi stered for one or more courses for that semester. Gol den I D students al so have 
the opportunity to become i nvol ved with the Golden I D Student Association, which provides 
cultural and social events, course recommendations, and peer advising. Additional information may 
be obtai ned from the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Adrri ssi ons at 301-314-8385. 



Non-Degree Seski ng Students 

A ppl i cants who qual ify for adrri ssi on but do not desi re to work toward a baccal aureate degree may 
be admitted as non-degree seeki ng students. 



1. Requi rerments and Applicati on Procedures Pa 9 e U 



Non-degree seeki ng students who have received a baccalaureate degree are advised that no credit 
earned whi I e enrol I ed may be appl i ed at a I ater date to a graduate program These post-baccal aureate 
students may enrol I i n undergraduate courses for whi ch they possess the necessary prerequi sites, but 
may not enrol I i n courses restri cted to graduate students onl y . Students who wi sh to take courses at 
the graduate I evd ( 600 and above) must contact the G raduate School for i nf ormati on concerni ng 
adrri ssi on requi rements for Advanced Sped al Student status. 

N on-degree seeki ng students who do not have a baccal aureate degree must subrri t transcri pts and 
meet regul ar adrri ssi on standards. Transcri pts are not requi red from students with baccal aureate 
degrees from a regional I y accredited institution. Because of space limitation, several departments 
requi re that perrri ssi on be gi ven i n advance to regi ster for cl asses as a non-degree student. PI ease 
contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Adrri ssi ons for further i nf ormati on. 

N on-degree seeki ng students who are taki ng cl asses to transfer i mmedi atd y back to another 
i nstitution may apply without academic transcri pts. These appl icants must, i n I ieu of transcri pts, 
submit off i ci al documentati on from that i nstituti on granti ng perrri ssi on to take course work at the 
U ni versi ty of M ary I and for that parti cul ar semester. 

Retur ni ng Students and Veterans 

A ppl i cants who have not attended school for more than f i ve years, or who have had rri I itary 
experi ence, shoul d contact both an adrri ssi on counsel or i n the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Adrri ssi ons 
at 301-314-8385 and the Returni ng Students Program at 301-314-7693. Veterans should also contact 
the University of Maryland Veterans Certification Office at 301-314-8239. 

Students returni ng to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and after a separati on of f i ve cal endar years may 
petition the appropriate dean to have a number of grades and credits from courses previously taken 
at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, removed from the cal cul ati on of thei r cumul ati ve grade 
poi nt averages and from the credits appl i ed toward graduati on requi rements. See i nf ormati on under 
"Registration, Academic Requirements and Regulations" in chapter 4. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION 

The University of Maryland seeks to enroll international students who demonstrate strong academic 
performance with records suggesting potential for success at Maryland. Admission is competitive 
and i s offered to appl i cants whose acaderri c credenti al s i ndi cate marks of "very good" to 
"excellent." D ue to space I i rri tati ons and the competitive nature of undergraduate adrri ssi on at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, an i nternati onal appl i cant shoul d subrri t a compl ete appl i cati on as earl y as 
possible, and always before the deadlines listed in this section. Applicati ons completed after a 
deadline will not te considered for that semester, but will be reviewed for the foil owing semester. 
E val uati on of an appl i cants credenti al s wi 1 1 take pi ace onl y after al I appl i cati on materi al s are 
received. 

Appl icants currently holdi ng or i ntendi ng to seek an F-l Student or J -1 Exchange Visitor visa to 
study i n the U nited States are consi dered i nternati onal appl i cants and shoul d observe the f ol I owi ng 
instructions. All other non- immigrant visa holders (including A, E, G, H, l,andl_) should follow the 
domestic Freshman and Transfer i nstructions. 

Freshman Admission - 1 nter national 

Y ou are consi dered a freshman appl i cant if you have compl eted fewer than 12 semester hours of 



1. Requi rerments and Applicati on Procedures Pa 9 e 12 



uni versi ty- 1 evd credi t beyond secondary school at the ti me you pi an to enter the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and. Successful freshman appl i cants demonstrate sati sf actory compl eti on of di verse 
col I ege- preparatory subj ects i n secondary school , prof i ci ency in English, and evi dence of suffi ci ent 
funds to cover al I expenses. Due to space I i rritati ore, we are unabl e to offer adrri ssi on to al I students 
who have the ability to be successful academically at the University of Maryland. 

The Fal I (A ugust) deadl i ne for appl i cati ore to be recei ved i s N ovember 1. The Spri ng (J anuary) 
general deadl i ne i s A ugust 1. 

A 1 1 of the fol I owi ng documents must be submitted before the freshman f i nal deadl i ne for an 
appl i cant to be consi dered for undergraduate adrri ssi on: I nternati onal Student A ppl i cati on for 
Undergraduate Adrri ssi on; nonrefundable application fee (U.S. $65.00); official secondary school 
transcri pts i n rati ve I anguage wi th certi f i ed I i teral English trarel ati ons and, where appropri ate, 
off i ci al results and certi fi cate of compl eti on from a nati onal secondary school exarri rati on and 
external board or agency exarri nati on; al I off i ci al uni versi ty or col I ege transcri pts i n nati ve I anguage 
with certified literal English translations (if any); proof of English proficiency (Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) or I international English Language Testing System (I ELTS)); SAT I or 
ACT official results statement of activities; essays; guidance counsel or and teacher recommendation 
I etters; and Certi fi cati on of F i nances, i ncl udi ng supporti ng documents that demonstrate support of 
U.S. $45,526 per year. Current F-l and J -1 Visa Holders must also provide photocopies of their 1-94 
Arrival/Departure Record, visa stamp, and current I -20 or DS-2019 form Current other 
non-i mrri grant Visa Holders must also provide photocopies of thei r I -94 Arrival/Departure Record 
and visa stamp. 

Transfer Admission - 1 nternational 

Y ou are consi dered a transfer appl i cant if you have compl eted 12 or more semester hours of 
uni versi ty- 1 evd credi t beyond secondary school at the ti me you pi an to enter the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and. Students who have compl eted fewer than 30 trareferabl e credits must submit hi gh school 
transcri pts and SAT I or ACT scores. Successful transfer appl i cants demonstrate better than average 
grades i n strong acaderri c courses, prof i ci ency in English, and evi dence of suffi ci ent funds to cover 
al I expenses. Due to space I i rritati ons, we are unabl e to offer adrri ssi on to al I students who have the 
ability to be academically successful at the University of Maryland. 

The Fal I (A ugust) f i nal deadl i ne for appl i cati ore to be reed ved i s M arch 1. The Spri ng (J anuary) 
f i nal deadl i ne is August 1. 

A 1 1 of the fol I owi ng documents must be submitted before the transfer f i nal deadl i ne for an appl i cant 
to be consi dered for undergraduate adrri ssi on: I nternati onal Student A ppl i cati on for U ndergraduate 
Admission; nonrefundable applicati on fee (U.S. $65.00); all official university or col I ege transcri pts 
i n nati ve I anguage wi th certi f i ed I i teral English transl ati ons; proof of E ngl i sh prof i ci ency; essays; 
statement of acti vi ti es; and Certi fi cati on of F i nances, i ncl udi ng supporti ng documents that 
demonstrate support of U .S. $45,526 per year . Current F-l and J -1 Visa Holders must also provide 
photocopies of thd r I -94 Arrival/Departure Record, visa stamp, and current I -20 or DS-2019 form 
C urrent other non- i mrri grant V i sa H ol ders must al so provi de photocopi es of thd r I -94 
Arrival/Departure Record and visa stamp. Students with fewer than 30 semester hours must also 
provi de off i ci al secondary school transcri pts i n nati ve I anguage wi th certi fi ed I i teral E ngl i sh 
trarel ati ons, SAT scores, and, where appropri ate, off i ci al results and certi fi cate of compl eti on from a 
national secondary school examination. 
English Proficiency 
Non-native English speakers (regardless of citizenship) who seek admission to the University of 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 13 



M aryl and must veri f y thei r prof i ci ency i n E ngl i sh by taki ng and subrri tti ng an off i ci al score report 
from one of the f ol I owi ng E ngl i sh prof i ci ency exams: TOE F L (Test of E ngl i sh as a Forei gn 
Language); or I ELTS (International English Language Test System). Please note that while TOEFL 
or I E LTS scores are requi red to sati sf y prof i ci ency i n E ngl i sh, the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Adrri ssi ons wi 1 1 conduct a f ul I f i I e revi ew consi deri ng al I appl i cati on materi al s submitted i n the 
appl i cati on package to make a deterrri nati on about the students I eve! of E ngl i sh prof i ci ency. Those 
whose nati ve I anguage i s E ngl i sh, or who have earned a post-secondary degree from a uni versi ty i n 
an E ngl i sh-speaki ng country do not need to take or subrri t scores from an E ngl i sh prof i ci ency 
exam Transfer creditfor an English compositioncoursefroma U.S. institution does not waive the 
E ngl i sh prof i ci ency exam 
Visa Records 

A ppl i cants Resi di ng Outsi de of the U nited States: To enter the U nited States, i nternati onal students 
resi di ng abroad wi 1 1 need a passport from thei r government and a vi sa from the U . S. Consul ate. I n 
order to obtai n a vi sa f or the purposes of study i ng i n the U nited States, the appl i cant must present a 
Certificateof Eligibility form (1-20) totheU.S. Consul ate for non-irrmi grant student status. The 
uni versi ty wi 1 1 i ssue thi s form to adrri tted students who have subrri tted proof of havi ng sufTi ci ent 
funds to cover the cost of a program of study. Admitted students with personal , family, or other 
source of private fundi ng wi 1 1 be issued the Certificate of El igi bi I ity form ( I -20) i n order to obtai n 
the F-l Student Visa. Admitted students who are sponsored by agencies, foundations, or thei r home 
government, or are parti ci pati ng i n an establ i shed exchange program may be i ssued the Certif i cate 
of El igi bi I ity form ( DS-2019) i n order to obtai n thej -1 Exchange Visitor Visa. 

A ppl i cants C urrenti y Resi di ng i n the U ni ted States: A ppl i cants current! y hoi di ng F - 1 Student or J - 1 
Exchange V i si tor status i n the U nited States need to submit a photocopy of thei r I -94 
Arrival/Departure Record, visa stamp, and current I -20 or DS-2019 form along with proof of havi ng 
sufT i ci ent funds to cover the cost of a program of study. A ppl i cants hoi di ng another type of 
non-i mrri grant status need to submit a photocopy of thei r I -94 Arrival/Departure Record and visa 
stamp, and must indicate if they intend to seek a change to F-l Student or J -1 Exchange Visitor 
status. U pon adrri ssi on and subrri ssi on of the appropri ate f i nanci al support documentati on, the 
university wi 1 1 issue the appropriate Certificate of El igi bi I ity form (1-20 or DS-2019) to the student. 

International External Exam 

The University of Maryland awards between 4 and 8 semester credits for most A-levd exams 
compl eted with a grade of C or better. U p to 4 semester credits may be awarded for certai n A S-l evd 
exams compl eted wi th acceptabl e grades. I nternati onal B accal aureate D i pi oma exams, Cambri dge 
I nternati onal exams, Cari bbean Advanced Prof i ci ency exams, West Af ri can Exarri nati on Counci I 
exams, Abitur, and other post-secondary exam scores may be recognized for credit. For further 
i nf ormati on, contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Admissions via email at um-admit@umd.edu or 301-314-8385. 



TRANSFER ADMISSION 

Admission to the University of Maryland is competitive. Revi ew the Statement of Phi I osophy of 
U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons and Admission Review Factors for more i nf ormati on regardi ng our 
adrri ssi on process. When the number of students desi ri ng adrri ssi on exceeds the number that can be 
accommodated at this institution, or in a particular professional or specialized program admission 
wi 1 1 be based on the overal I strength of the students acaderri c performance. 

I n accordance with Maryland Higher Education Commission and Board of Regents transfer polices . 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 14 



certai n appl i cants from M aryl and publ i c i nsti tuti ons are gi ven speci al consi derati on and are adrri tted 
when space i s avai I abl e. 

The Admission Committee considers the students academic record and grades received i n al I 

col I ege- 1 eve! courses. Students are expected to have compl eted English Composi ti on (the equi val ent 

of UM'sENGL 101) and col I ege level mathemati cs (the equi val ent of UM's Math 110 or above). 

Students who graduate from hi gh school and subsequentl y compl ete a rri ni mum of 12 semester 
hours or 18 quarter hours duri ng a regul ar term exd udi ng summer school , at a regi onal I y accredi ted 
col I ege or uni versi ty are consi deed transfer appl i cants. Students who compl ete fewer than 30 
semester or 45 quarter hours are expected to submit high school records and SAT I and/or ACT 
scores for review. When an applicant has attended more than one institution, a cumulative average 
for al I previ ous col I ege work attempted wi 1 1 be computed. To be consi dered, course work must have 
been completed at a regional I y accredited col lege or university. 

Application Dates 

Semester Dabs 

Spring Priority - August 1 

Spri ng - N ovember 15 

Fall Priority- March 1 
Fall- Junel 

Transfer from Maryland Public I restitutions 

Currently, appl icants who have attended M aryl and publ ic i nstitutions may be admitted i n 
accordance with the criteria ourJ i ned i n the previous paragraph. The university subscri bes to the 
policies set forth in the Maryland Higher Education Commission (M HEC) and Board of Regents 
transfer pol i ci es. When the number of students desi ri ng adrri ssi on exceeds the number that can be 
accommodated i n a parti cul ar prof essi onal or speci al i zed program adrri ssi on wi 1 1 be based on 
cri teri a devd oped by the uni versi ty to sd ect the best qual i f i ed students. 

A rti cul ated transfer programs are avai I abl e at each M aryl and communi ty col I ege. A n arti cul ated 
transfer program i s a I i st of courses that best prepare appl i cants for a parti cul ar course of study at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and. A ppl i cants who take appropri ate courses speci fi ed i n the arti cul ated 
program and earn acceptable grades are guaranteed transfer with no loss of credit. Articulated 
transfer programs hd p students pi an tha r new programs after changi ng career obj ecti ves. M ore 
i nf ormati on about A RTSY S, the arti cul ati on system i s avai I abl e onl i ne at http://artweb. usmd.edu . 
A ppl i cants can d i mi rate al I doubt concerni ng transfer of courses by f ol I owi ng arti cul ated programs. 

General Transfer I nf on nation 

Admitted students wi 1 1 reed ve a prd i rri nary review of transfer credit withi n two weeks after 
reed vi ng the I etter of adrri ssi on. A n off i ci al revi ew of transfer credi t occurs thereafter, wi th f i nal 
deterrri rati on of appl i cabi I ity made by an acaderri c advi sor/eval uator i n the off i ce of the appropri ate 
dean for the major. Generally, college-levd courses completed at regionally-accredited institutions 
wi 1 1 transfer provi ded that grades of at I east "C-" are earned and the course i s si rri I ar i n content and 
scope to work offered at M aryl and. The regi onal accrediti ng bodi es are M i ddl e States Associ ati on of 
Colleges and Schools, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, North Central 
Association of Colleges and Schools, Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, Southern 
Associ ati on of Col I eges and School s, and Western Associ ati on of School s and Col I eges. U p to 60 
credits from a community or two-year col lege, or 90 credits from a four-year col lege, may be 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures 



Page 15 



appl i ed toward the degree. Regardl ess of the total number of transfer credti s,students must compl ete 
at I east their last 30 credits at the University of Maryland, College Park. Normally these 30 credits 
wi 1 1 be the f i nal 30 credits counted toward the degree. However, credits from U ni versity-approved 
study abroad and i nternshi p programs, and a maxi mum of six credits that are not part of such 
programs, may be i ncl uded i n the f i nal 30 if approved i n advance by the dean of the academi c unit 
from whi ch the student expects to recei ve the degree. 

Transfer of course work completed at Maryland public colleges and universities is covered by the 
Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) transfer policies (see compl ete text later inthis 
section). M aryland wi 1 1 accept grades of "D-" (as of Fal I 2012) or better from appropriate course 
work compl eted at a regi onal I y-accredi ted M aryl and publ i c i nsti tuti on. 

TheTransfer Credit Center provides articulation i information and assistance to students and transfer 
advi sors. The Center, a j oi nt effort between the Offi ces of U ndergraduate Adrri ssi ons and the Off i ce 
of the Regi strar, has computeri zed and consol i dated the transfer credi t eval uati on process. 1 1 
provi des i ncorni ng students from domesti c i nsti tuti ons with i nf ormati on on acceptabi I ity of credits 
and transfer equi val end es, subj ect to adj ustment by advi sors wi thi n the students individual program 
Certai n courses (eg., those not appeari ng or not fully daborated i n the sendi ng i nstitution's current 
catal og) may requi re addi ti onal i nformati on such as syl I abi , portf ol i os, etc. , before eval uati on. 

I nformati on on transferability of specific courses to the University of Maryland, College Park may 
be accessed on the web at www.tce.umd.edu/TCE . 

Each col lege-levd course wi 1 1 be eval uated i ndi vidual ly, with appl icabi I ity toward major or general 
education requi rements deterrri ned by the appropriate academic unit. The university does not 
transfer bl ocks of courses, such as those compl eted through the Associ ate's Degree. See 
"Departments, M ajors and Programs" for specific general education and major requi rements. 

C redi t wi 1 1 be posted to your M aryl and record onl y from off i ci al transcri pts sent from the i nsti tuti on 
at whi ch the credit was compl eted. Students who have earned credit through Advanced PI acement 
(AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), orCollege-Levd Examination Program(CLEP) subject area 
exams must have scores sent di recti y from the testi ng board, even i f they are al ready posted on a 
transcri pt from another i nsti tuti on. 



SOURCE 


ACCEPT 
CREDITS? 

1 


EQUIVALENT OR 

REQUIRED 

CREDITS 


1 

GRADE S/SCORES 

WHERE APPROPRIATE 


Note Sometransfer credit policies are under review. Pleasecall U ndergraduate Admissions 
for current information. 


ACE Non Collegiate 
Courses 


No 


Advanced Placement 
Program (CEEB) 


Yes 


EorRl 


3 or higher (see chart i n 
Chapter 1) 


CLEP 


Yes 


EorRl 


See chart i n Chapter 4 


Community Col 1 ege of the 
Air Force 


Yes 


EorRl 


C- or higher equivalent 
grade as appropri ate to dept 


Correspondence courses 


No 


Dantes 


No 





1. Requi rerments and Applicati on Procedures 



Page 16 



Defense 


Yes 

Language 

Institute 


EorRl 


Scores as appropri ate to 
department 


Departmental exams from 
other col leges 


Yes 

1 


EorRl 


C- or higher 


1 
International Baccalaurate 


SYes 


EorRl 


5 or higher (see chart i n 
Chapter 1) 


Life experience 


N o, unl ess val i dated through C L E P or U ni versi ty of M ary 1 and, 
Col 1 ege Park departmental exam 


Military credit 


No 


Nursing school courses: by 
transfer/by chal 1 enge exam 


No 2 


Other articulation 
agreements ( propri ety 
school s, publ i c agenci es, 
etc.) 


No, unless a newly-formed Maryland public institution operating 
under auspi ces of M H EC 


PON SI non-collegiate work 


No 


Portfol i o credits from other 
colleges 


No 



1. Courses must be similar in depth and scope to University of Maryland courses. Applicability is 
deterrri ned by the appropri ate dean. 

2. Professional courses are generally not transferable. Course taken at a regionally-accredited 
i nstituti on may be revi ewed by the appropri ate dean. 

Statement on Transfer of CourseC redit 

The University of Maryland wel comes transfer students and has transfer agreements (sometimes 
referred to as "arti cul ati on" agreements) to encourage and ai d students i n thei r efforts to take 
appropri ate courses pri or to transfer. Each course i s eval uated i ndi vi dual I y for students seeki ng to 
transfer to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. C redi t i s granted for courses that are appl i cabl e to a B achd or 
of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, and for which a grade of "C-" or above was earned. Courses 
completed at Maryland public two- or four-year institutions may be transferred with grades of "D-" 
(as of Fal I 2012) or above provi ded that course content i s appropri ate to our academi c programs. 

Maximum Number of Transfer Credits Accepted 

The U ni versi ty of M aryl and has di rect transfer agreements with al I M aryl and community col I eges, 
as wd I as other j uni or and community col leges outside of the state. The university wi 1 1 accept for 
transfer a maxi mum of 60 credits from a two-year program or 90 credits from a four-year program 
for courses i n which a grade of "C-" (as of Fal I 2012) or above was earned and which are appropriate 
to an approved curri cul um at thi s i nstituti on. 

Maximum Number of Credits Allowed for Non-Traditional Learning 

Students who have acqui red col lege-levd learni ng through work or other non-col I egi ate activities 
may wi sh to transl ate thd r experi ence i nto credits at M aryl and by val i dati on through the nati onal 
CLEP examination (College-Levd Examination Program) or credit- by-exarri nation administered by 
academic departments. The university will accept a maxi mum of 30 hours of creditthrough 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 17 



examination. 

Minimum Number of Credits Required Through Classroom I nstruction in the Major Field 
and for the Degree 

The University of Maryland requires a minimum of 120 semester hours of credit for an 
undergraduate degree; some programs requi re more. Regardl ess of the total number of transfer 
credits, students must complete at I east their last 30 credits at the University of Maryland, College 
Park. Normally these 30 credits will be the final 30 credits counted toward the degree. However, 
credits from U ni versity-approved study abroad and i nternshi p programs, and a maxi mum of six 
credits that are not part of such programs, may be i ncl uded i n the f i nal 30 if approved i n advance by 
the dean of the acaderri c uni t from whi ch the student expects to recei ve the degree. 

Statement on Transfer of General Education Requirements 

As directed by the Maryland Higher Education Commission (M HEC) Transfer Policy, transferable 
courses taken i n f ulf i 1 1 ment of general educati on requi rements at a M aryl and publ i c i nstituti on wi 1 1 
be applied toward University of Maryland's general education requirements. Careful planning with 
an acaderri c advi sor wi 1 1 ensure that students take appropri ate credi t and maxi mi ze thei r credi t 
transfer. The total number of general educati on credits for a M aryl and publ i c i nstituti on transfer or 
post baccal aureate credi ts wi 1 1 not exceed that requi red of nati ve students. 

Transfer credit Policy- Maryland Higher Education Commission (Title 13B) 

www.dsd.state.md. us/comar/subtitl e_chapters/13B_Chapters. htm 



RESIDENCY INFORMATION 

Residency Classification Office, 1130 Mitchell Building 

301-314^9596; Fax: 301-314-7915 

E-mail: resclass@umd.edu 

www.testudo.umd.edu/rco 

Petitions, related documents and questions concerni ng the Board of Regents Pol icy on Student 

CI assif i cati on for Adrri ssi on and Tuiti on Purposes shoul d be di rected to the Resi dency 

C I assi f i cati on Offi ce i n the Offi ce of the Regi strar. 

Determination of I n-State Status for Admission and Tuition Purposes: See 

vwwv.usmh.usnrd.edu/regents/taylavys/SectionVI I l/VI 1 1 270.html for the complete text of this 

policy. 

A n i ni ti al deterrri nati on of i n-state status wi 1 1 be made by the Offi ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons 

at the ti me a students' appl i cati on for adrri ssi on i s consi dered. The deterrri nati on made at that ti me, 

and any deterrri nati on made thereafter, shal I prevai I i n each semester unti I the deterrri nati on i s 

successful ly chal lenged. Students may chal lenge thei r classification by subrritti ng a ti mely petition 

to the Resi dency C I assi f i cati on Offi ce. Deterrri nati ons are based on the resi dency pol i cy and 

requi rements. The deadl i ne for subrritti ng a compl ete petiti on al org with al I supporti ng documents, 

i s the fi rst day of the semester i n whi ch the student wi shes to be d assif i ed as i n-state. 

The vol ume of requests for reel assif i cati on may necessitate a del ay i n compl eti ng the revi ew 

process. A deci si on i n each case wi 1 1 be made withi n 60 days of recei pt of a compl ete petiti on and al I 

requi red documentati on. D uri ng thi s peri od of ti me, or any further peri od of ti me requi red by the 

university, any fees and charges based on the previous deterrri nation must be paid. The student is 

sol d y responsi bl e for any I ate charges i ncurred by the resi dency process. I f the deterrri nati on i s 

changed, any excess fees and charges wi 1 1 be refunded. 

Students d assif i ed as i n-state for adrri ssi on and tuiti on purposes are responsi bl e for notifyi ng the 



1. Requi rerments and Applicati on Procedures Pa 9 e 18 



Resi dency CI assif i cati on Off i ce i n writi ng withi n 15 days of any change i n thei r ci rcumstances that 
night in any way affect their classification at the University of Maryland. 



RE ADM I SSI ON AND RE INSTATE ME NT 

Students who are admitted and do not regi ster for thei r f i rst semester or cancel regi strati on pri or to 
begi nni ng thei r fi rst semester must appl y agai n for adrri ssi on (see F reshman or Transfer A cirri ssi on) . 
Students who are admitted as "Term Only" also must apply agai n for admission if they wish to 
register for a subsequent term Students admitted as "Non-Degree" seeking students, who would like 
to become degree-seeki ng students, must appl y agai n for adrri ssi on (see Transfer A drri ssi on) . 

Students who have matri cul ated and regi stered and di d not mai ntai n that regi strati on conti nuousl y 
( Fal I and Spri ng semesters) to graduati on, must appl y for readmi ssi on or rei nstatement to re-enrol I at 
the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. 

See "Withdrawal and Leave of Absence from the University" in chapter 4 for more detailed 
information. 

Readmi si on 

Students must appl y f or readrri ssi on i f they i nterrupt regi strati on for one or more semesters and 
were not acaderri cal I y di smi ssed at the concl usi on of the I ast semester of attendance. 

Reinstatement 

Students who are acaderri cally disrni ssed from the uni versi ty must appl y for rei nstatement. A 1 1 
appl ications for rei nstatement are reviewed by a Faculty Petition Board. Students may apply for 
rei nstatement for the semester i mmedi atd y f ol I owi ng di srri ssal or for any subsequent semester. 
Only the Faculty Petition Board can grant rei nstatement. 

Students who are deni ed rei nstatement wi 1 1 be requi red to compl y wi th sped f i c recommendati ons 
made by the Faculty Petiti on Board i n order to be consi dered for rei nstatement i n a future semester. 

Rei nstatement After Withdrawal 

Students who withdraw from the university must apply for rei nstatement if they i nterrupt enrol I mart 
for one or more semesters. 

Students may apply for readrri ssi on or rei nstatement at www.studentsuccess.umd.edu. 

Application Deadlines; readrri ssi on and reinstatement)* 

Fall: April 1 
Spring November 1 

* Students who wish to reenrol I for summer term must apply for fal I reenrol I mart. Students who 
wi sh to enrol I for wi nter term must appl y for spri ng reenrol I mart. 

Students who have been academically dismissed and wi sh to return the f ol I owi ng semester must 
apply by: 

•June5forfall enrollment 

• J anuary 5 for spri ng enrol I ment 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 19 



All students are encouraged to apply early in order to take advantage of early registration. 

Summer School 

Students who are di smi ssed or withdraw at the end of the f al I semester are not d i gi bl e to attend 
Summer Sessi ons unl ess or unti I they are approved for rei nstatement. Students di srri ssed at the end 
of a spri ng semester may attend any Summer Sessi ons pri or to bei ng rei nstated, provi ded the student 
regi stered for Summer Sessi on courses pri or to di srri ssal or withdrawal , or has appl i ed for 
reenrollment. 

Winter Term 

Students di srri ssed or withdraw at the end of the f al I semester may attend Wi nter Term pri or to 
bei ng rei nstated provi ded the student regi stered for Wi nter Term pri or to di srri ssal or withdrawal . 
Wi nter Term i s offered to students who have attended duri ng the precedi ng f al I semester. Students 
with a break i n attendance must be reenrol I ed to be d i gi bl e to attend Wi nter Term Students 
readrrittecl/rd nstated for a spri ng semester may al so attend Wi nter Term 

Clearances 

Clearances from Judicial Programs, the Bursar, Health Center, International Education Services 
and/or the G raduate School may be requested of the appl i cart. 

Applications 

A ppl i cati ons for readrri ssi on and rd nstatement may be accessed vi a the web at.httpV/www.studentsuo 
htrp://www.studentsuccess.umd.edu/ 

Additional I nformation 

Student Success Office, 110 Hornbake Library, Office of Undergraduate Studies, University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. Email: rr-adrrit@umd.edu. 



OFFICE OF EXTENDED STUDIES (Summer Term Winter Term Freshmen 
Connection, Professorial Programs) 

0132 Main Administration Building 

301-405-7762 

oes.umd.edu 

Chuck Wilson, Assistant Vice President for Records, Registration, and Extended Studies 

The Office of Extended Studies administers the University's Summer Term Winter Term Freshmen 
Connection, and Professional Programs. 

Summer Term serves more than 13,000 students that i ncl ude current students, vi siti ng students 

from other universities and colleges, graduates, professionals, and high school students. Summer 

Term features more than 1,700 courses that are offered morni ng, afternoon, eveni ng, and onl i ne 

duri ng three- week or six- week sessions. 

Winter Term serves more than 5,000 students that i ncl ude current students, vi siti ng students from 

other uni versi ti es and col I eges, graduates and prof essi onal s. Offered i n J anuary between the end of 

the f al I semester and the begi nni ng of the spri ng semester, Wi nter Term i s a three- week sessi on that 

features more than 300 courses that meet morni ng, afternoon, eveni ng, and onl i ne. 

Freshmen Connection offers spri ng-adrritted students the opportunity to begi n thd r U ni versity of 

M aryland education i n thefal I semester. With Freshmen Connection, spri ng-adrritted students earn 



1. Requi rements and A ppl i cati on Procedures Pa 9 e 20 



up to 17 U ni versity credits toward thd r undergraduate degree and get on track to graduate i n four 

years. 

PreCdlege Programs 

The Young Scholars Program, a three-week summer program i nvites risi ng high school 

sophomores, j uniors, and seniors to pursue academic i nterests, discover career opportunities, earn 

university credits, and explore university life. Highly qualified students enroll in a three-credit 

i ntroductory course f eaturi ng f i d d tri ps and guest speakers. Students parti ci pate i n workshops and 

serri nars that further enri ch thei r uni versi ty experi ence and resi de on campus or commute from 

home. 

Young Scholars Discovery, a two- week summer program i nvites mi ddl e school students to expl ore 

educati on and career opportuni ti es and I earn about uni versi ty I i f e A caderri cal I y promi si ng students 

enrol I i n non-credi t courses, attend f i el d tri ps, and engage wi th experts i n i nnovati ve f i d ds. Students 

col I aborate i n i nteracti ve semi nars, enj oy eveni ng soci al acti vi ti es, and resi de on campus or 

commute from home. 

The Freshmen First Program prepares i ncorri ng f i rst-year students for I i vi ng and I earni ng at the 

University of Maryland. The program eases the transition to the university environment. In this 

three- week summer program students enrol Una three-credit course, attend serri nars, workshops, 

and soci al acti vi ti es, meet and study wi th other i ncorri ng freshmen, and resi de on campus or 

commute from home. 

Professional Programs i ncl ude Prof essi onal M asters programs, G raduate Certi f i cate programs, 

post- baccal aureate opportuni ti es, and custom zed i ni ti ati ves that i ncl ude serri nars, work force 

trai ni ng, and short courses crafted for i ndustry appl i cati on. All programs are desi gned to meet the 

educational needs of professional audiences and target external constituencies i n busi ness, 

government, and non-profit organizations. These programs serve professional audiences i n new 

ways, i mprovi ng access for prof essi onal audi ences through i nnovati ve approaches to teachi ng and 

I earni ng, parti cul arl y through the onl i ne envi ronment. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

A ppl i cants who have earned or wi 1 1 earn a bachd or's degree at a regi onal I y accredi ted col I ege or 
university i n theUnited States (or the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree i n another country) are 
d i gi bl e to be consi deed for adrri ssi on to the G raduate School at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and . 
G raduate School and degree program cri teri a for adrri ssi on are avai I abl e i n the G raduate Catal og, 
avai lable onl i ne at www.gradschool .umd.edu/catalog. For more i information on graduate degree 
programs, f i nanci al ai d for graduate study, deadl i nes, and onl i ne appl i cati on i nstrucrj ons, pi ease 
visit the Graduate School's website, www.gradschool.umd.edu . email gradschool@umd.edu, or call 
the Graduate School Information Center at 301-405-0376. Hard-copy correspondence can be 
addressed to the G raduate School , 2123 L ee B ui I di ng, U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, M D 
20742-5121. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al Aid Pa 9 e 21 

2 Feesy Expenses and Financial Aid 

TUITION AND BILL PAYMENT INFORMATION 

1135 Lee Building 
301-314-9000 
301-405-0659 fax 
F i nanci al Servi ces Center 
billtalk@umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/bursar 
1-888-313-2404 

Tuition and fees for the U ni versity of M aryland, Col lege Park, are listed i n the next section. The 

university requi res that al I deposits and fees be paid by stated deadl i nes, or penalties must be 

i imposed. M any potenti al adrni ni strati vediffi cul ti es can be avoi ded i f students careful I y f ol I ow 

publ i shed procedures and notify the appropri ate off i ce(s) of any changes that rri ght affect thei r 

fi nanci al obi igation to the university. This i ncl udes updati ng your emai I address so communication 

concerni ng your bi 1 1 i ng i s prompt, and noti f yi ng the B ursar's Off i ce of changes of address so that 

mai I affecti ng the students f i nanci al rd ati onshi p wi th the uni versi ty will not be dd ayed or returned. 

Tuition and bill payment information for Summer Term Winter Term Freshmen Connection and 

Professional Programs may be found at www.oes.umd.edu. 

Col lege Park sponsors a deferred- payment plan for the Fal I and Spri ng semesters only. I information 

regardi ng the Terp payment pi an i s avai I abl e by cal I i ng 301-314-9000 or 1-888-313-2404 or at 

www.umd.edu/bursar . 

A 1 1 charges i ncurred duri ng a semester are payabl e i mmedi atd y . Returni ng students wi 1 1 not be 

perrri tted to compl ete regi strati on unti I al I f i nanci al obi i gati ons to the uni versi ty, i ncl udi ng I i brary 

f i nes, parki ng vi ol ati ons, and other penalty fees and servi ce charges, are pai d i n f ul I . 

Payment for past due bal ances and current semester fees i s due on or before the f i rst day of d asses. 

Students who register i n advance must pay thd r bi I Is i n f ul I prior to the general registration period. 

Students who regi ster after the initial regi strati on peri od are requi red to make f ul I payment by the 

due date i ndi cated to avoi d caned I ati on of thd r enrol I ment and I oss of thd r d assroom seats to other 

students. 

A I though the uni versi ty bi 1 1 s students monthl y, i t cannot assume responsi bi I i ty f or thd r reed pt. 

Students are reminded that it i s thd r responsibility to notify the University of any change in thdr 

email address. If a student bill i s not reed ved on or before the beginning of each semester, itisthe 

students responsi bility to obtai n a copy of the bi 1 1 . To check your account bal ance or vi ew your 

monthly bi 1 1 i ng statement go to www. umd.edu/bursar and choose "Student Account I nqui ry" or go 

to the F i nanci al Servi ce Center, 1135 L ee B ui I di ng. T he off i ce i s open M onday through F ri day, 8: 30 

am to 4:30 p.m 

A 1 1 checks or money orders shoul d be made payabl e to the University of Maryland for the exact 

amount due. Students name and student s University I D number should be written on the 

front side of the check. Uni versity grants and scholarships will be posted to the students account. 

However, the first bill mailed prior to the beginning of each semester may not include these credits. 

Students are urged to check thei r resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ce agreements for procedures for 

caned I ati on of reservations and for deadl i nes for reed vi ng refunds of deposits. Refunds cannot be 

made after these deadlines, even if the student decides not to attend the University of Maryland, 

Col lege Park. 

Students wi 1 1 i ncur a I ate payment f ee i n the event of f ai I ure to pay a bal ance on thd r student account 

by its due date. A I ate payment fee of $10.00 or 5%, whi chever i s hi gher, wi 1 1 be assessed i n 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 22 



add ti on to the total past due amount. A n addi ti onal 1.5% f i nance charge wi 1 1 be charged monthl y i f 

the account i s not settl ed. 

Students who f ai I to pay the i ndebtedness duri ng the semester i n whi ch del i nquency occurs wi 1 1 be 

indigibleto regi ster for subsequent semesters unti I the debt and the penalty fees are cl eared. 

I n the event a student wi th a del i nquent account becomes regi stered for a future semester, the 

account must be setrj ed i n f ul I pri or to the onset of the future semester, to avoi d cancel I ati on of 

registration. 

Thestate has established, under legislative mandate, a Central Collections Unit (CCU) within the 

Department of Budget and Fiscal Planni ng. The university is requi red by state law to refer al I 

del i nquent accounts to the State Col I ecti ons U ni t. PI ease note that M ary I and I aw al I ows the Central 

Col I ecti ons U ni t to i intercept state i ncome tax refunds for i ndi vi dual s wi th del i nquent accounts, and 

thatCCU is authorized to notify a National C redit Bureau of the delinquency at the time the account 

i s referred to i t for col I ecti on. 

All accounts due from students* faculty, staff, non-students, etc, are included within these 

guidelines. 

Central Col I ecti ons U nit costs i ncurred i n col I ecti ng del i nquent accounts wi 1 1 be charged to the 

student. The mi ni mum col I ecti on fee i s 17% pi us attorney and/or court costs. 

No degrees, di plomas, certificates, or transcri pts of records wi 1 1 be issued to students who have not 

made sati sf actory settl ement of thei r accounts. 

Note Additional Information on Student Financial Obligations, Disclosure of Information, 

Delinquent Accounts, and Special Fees, can be found in the "Policy Statements" section at the 

begi nni ng of thi s catal og. 

Payment of Fees 

All checks, money orders, or postal notes should be made payableto "University of Maryland." The 
students U ni versi ty I D number must be wri tten on the front of the check. V I SA , M asterCard, 
A meri can Express, and Di scover credit cards, and onl i ne check payment are accepted. Onl i ne 
payments can be made by cl icki ng on the bl ue box a twww. umd.edu/bursar. 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES 

1135 Lee Building 
301-314-9000 
301-405-0659 fax 
F i nanci al Servi ces Center 
bi I ltalk@umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/bursar 
1-888-313-2404 



*An Important Fee Notice Notwithstanding any other provision of this or any other University 
publication, the University reserves the right to make changes in tuition, fees, and other charges at 
any time deemed necessary by the University and the University System of Maryland Board of 
Regents. Tuition and fee information is published in the Registration Guide each semester and is 
also available on-line at www. umd. edu/bursar. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P^ 23 



2012-2013 Academic Year-Estimated* 
Full-time Undergraduate Students 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time if the nurrber of credit hours enrolled is 12 or more.) 



Maryland Residents (I n-state) 

Total Academe 
Year Cost 

Tuition $7,175 

M andatory Fees (includes Tech fee) 1 733 

Maximum charged to all students registered for 9 or more credits ' 

Board (Resident Dining Plan) 3,975 

5,918 
Room (Includes Telecom fee) 

Residents of the District of Columbia, Other States, and Other Countries 

Total Academe 
Year Costs 

Tuition $25,554 

M andatory Fees (includes Tech fee) 1 7 33 

Maximum charged to all students registered for 9 or more credits ' 

B oard Contract (Resident Dining Plan) 3,975 

Room (includes the Telecom fee) 5,918 



Tuition and Fees for Part-time Undergraduate Students 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered part-time if the number of credit hours enrolled is 11 or fewer) 

I n- State Tuition (per credit hour) $ 299 

Out-of-State Tuition (per credit hour) 1,065 

M andatory Fees (per semester) 

9-11 credi t hours (per semester) 867 

8 or fewer credi t hours (per semester) 400 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 24 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

1135 Lee Building 
301-314-9000 
301-405-0659 fax 
F i nanci al Servi ces Center 
billtalk@umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/bursar 
1-888-313-2404 



Mandatory F 

Student Fees The mandatory fee assessment for undergraduate students i s based on a number of 
requested credit hours as fol lows: Students registered for 9 or more credits: $867 per semester; 
students registered for 8 or fewer credits: $400 per semester. 

Student Activities Fee ( Ref undabl e) : C harged to al I undergraduate students at the request of the 
Student Government Association. It is used i n sponsori ng various student activities, student 
publications, and cultural programs. 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students. This fee is paid into a fund that is 
used for capital i mprovement, expansi on, and constructi on of vari ous campus facilities such as open 
recreation areas (tennis courts, basketball courts, etc.), transportation alternatives, and the Stamp 
Student U ni on. These proj ects are not funded or are funded onl y i n part from other sources. 

Athletic Fee ( Ref undabl e) : C harged to al I students for the support of the Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics. All students are encouraged to participate in all of the activities of this 
department or to attend the contests if they do not parti ci pate. 

Shuttle Bus Fee (Ref undabl e) : Charged to al I students for the support of the shutti e bus 
transportation system 

Stamp Student Union and Recreational Fee (Refundable): Charged to al I students and is used to 
expand recreati onal facilities and Stamp Student U ni on servi ces. 

Recreation Services Fee ( Ref undabl e) : C harged to al I students sped f i cal I y to support the 
construction and operation of Ritchie Col iseum and the Campus Recreation Center, a multi-use 
facility that i ncl udes basketbal I and racquetbal I courts, i ndoor and outdoor pool s, an i ndoor j oggi ng 
track, and multipurpose activity spaces. 

Performing Arts and Cultural Center Fee Charged to al I students to support the operation of the 
CI ari ce Smith Perform ng A its Center. 

Tdecornrnunications Fee A ssessed to al I students I i vi ng i n uni versi ty resi dence hal I s. 

Technology Feas Charged to undergraduate students, to support the i mprovement of the computer 
systems on campus. 

Other Fees 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P^ 25 



Undergraduate Application FeeA non-ref undabl e fee of $65 i s charged to al I new appl i cants. 

Enrollment Confirmation Deposit All newly admitted undergraduate students who i ntend to 
matri cul ate i n the Fal I or Spri ng semester must submit a non-ref undabl e $400 deposit, whi ch i s 
credited to thei r tuiti on charges when they enrol I . Shoul d the student deci de not to enrol I for the 
specif i c semester of appl i cati on, the $400 deposit i s forfeited and cannot be used to offset any 
charges, i ncl udi ng ori entati on charges, the student may i ncur. 

Students admitted for the Fal I semester must submit thi s deposit by M ay 1 or withi n 30 days from 
thei r date of adrri ssi on, whi chever i s I ater, to reserve thei r pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. Students 
admitted for the Spri ng semester must submit thi s deposit by December 1 or withi n 14 days of thei r 
date of adrri ssi on, whi chever i s I ater, to reserve thei r pi ace i n the enteri ng cl ass. 

Pre-Cd lege Orientation Program Registration Fee $160 Freshmen (two-day program), $101 
Transfer (one-day program), $60.00 Parent (per person). 

L ate Registration Fee A 1 1 students are expected to compl ete thei r regi strati on on the regul ar 
regi strati on days. Those who do not compl ete thei r regi strati on duri ng the prescri bed days must pay 
a $20 1 ate regi strati on fee 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in Mathematics (MATH 003> OlO, 
013, 013 and 015) per semester: A fee of $280 i s requi red of students whose curri cul um cal I s for 

M ATH 110 or 115 and who do not pass the qual ifyi ng exarni nati on for these courses. Thi s Sped al 
M ath F ee i s i n addi ti on to course charge. Students enrol I ed i n thi s course and concurrentl y enrol I ed 
for ni ne or more credit hours wi 1 1 be consi dered as f ul I -ti me students for purposes of assessi ng fees. 

Cooperative Education in Liberal Arts, Business, and Science 
(UNI V 098-099) Per Semester: $60 

Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 096-099) Per Semester: $60 

Other Special Fees The university offers a number of courses (M BA, ENTS, Chemical and Life 
Sci ences, A ni mal Sci ences) that have sped al course fees i n addi ti on to, or i n I i eu of, the standard 
tuiti on charges. Students are encouraged to contact the department pri or to regi steri ng for the cl ass to 
deterrri ne the total cost of the course. 

Fees for Auditors: Fees for auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as those charged for 
courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate and graduate I eve! s. A udi ted credit hours wi 1 1 be 
added to hours taken for credit to deterrri ne f ul I -ti me or part-ti me status for fee assessment purposes. 
Sped al Students are assessed fees i n accordance with the schedul e for the comparabl e undergraduate 
or graduate cl assi f i cati on. 

Special Examination Fee (C redit-by-Exam): $30 per course for al I undergraduates and f ul I -ti me 

graduate students; credit- hour charge for part-ti me graduate students. 

Parking Registration Fees: All students enrol led for classes at the university and who drive or park 
a vehi cl e anywhere or anyrj me on the campus must regi ster to park on campus each academi c year. 
For additi onal i nf ormati on, pi ease refer to Department of Transportati on Servi ces. 

Textbooks and Supplies: Textbooks and classroom suppl ies vary with the course pursued, but 
averaged $1130 in 2012-2013 (two semesters). 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checks Payable for each check which is returned unpaid by the 
drawer bank on i niti al presentati on because of i nsuff i ci ent funds, payment stopped, post-dati ng, 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 26 



drawn agai nst uncol lected items, etc. 

For checks up to $100: $10 

For checks from $100.01 to $500: $25 

For checks over $500: $50 

When a check is returned unpaid, the student must redeem the check and pay any outstandi ng 

bal ance i n the account withi n 10 days or I ate fees may be assessed and the account transferred to the 

Central Collection Unitfor legal follow-up. Additionally, a minimum 17% col lection charge is 

added to the charges posted to the student's account at the ti me the transfer i s made. When a check i s 

returned unpai d due to an error made by the student's bank, the student must obtai n a I etter from the 

branch manager of the bank or a person of equivalent status adrritti ng the error. This letter must be 

subrri tted to the Off i ce of the B ursar to have the servi ce charge wai ved. 

Overdue L ibrary C harges For items from the I i brary's mai n ci rcul ati ng col I ecti ons, charges are 

.50 cents per day per item and recalled item fines are $2 per day. If an item is lost or mutilated, the 

borrower i s charged the esti mated cost of the item pi us a processi ng fee to cover acqui siti on and 

catal ogi ng costs. D i ff erent f i ne rates may appl y to other I i brary col I ecti ons, such as reserve 

collections. 

Maryland Engjish Institute Fee Serri- intensive, $3,406.00. Intensive, $5,972.00. Students 

enrol led with the M aryland Engl ish I nstitute pay this fee i n support of the I nstitute. Students enrol led 

i n the serri - i ntensi ve program may al so enrol I for regul ar academi c courses and pay the tui ti on and 

fees associ ated with those offeri ngs. The program al so offers non-credit courses i n A meri can 

English Pronunciation (UMEI 006) for $943.00 and Fluency Program or Advanced Writing (UMEI 

007, 008) for $1,253.00. These charges are subject to change. 

Property Damage C harge Students wi 1 1 be charged for damage to property or equi pmert. When 

responsi bi I i ty f or the damage can be f i xed, the i ndi vi dual student wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed for it; when 

responsi bi I i ty cannot be f i xed, the cost of repai ri ng the damage or repl aci ng equi pmert wi 1 1 be 

prorated among the i ndi vi dual s i nvol ved. 

Late Payment Fee Per-semester fee of 5% of overdue amount, or $10, whichever is greater, pi us 

an addi ti onal 1. 5% on each subsequent bi 1 1 i ng. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Feas Students compel I ed to I eave the uni versi ty at any ti me duri ng the 

academi c year shoul d meet with thei r academi c col I ege advi si ng off i ce and secure a form for 

withdrawal . The compl eted form and i dentif i cati on card are to be submitted to the academi c col I ege 

advi si ng off i ce whi ch wi 1 1 communi cate results to the Off i ce of the Regi strar. Students wi 1 1 forfeit 

thei r ri ght to a refund i f the wi thdrawal acti on descri bed above i s not adhered to. T he eff ecti ve date 

used i n computi ng refunds i s the date the withdrawal form i s f i I ed i n the academi c col I ege advi si ng 

off i ce. Stop payment on a check, f ai I ure to pay the semester bi 1 1 , or f ai I ure to attend cl asses does not 

constitute withdrawal . Refund requests should be processed by students with the Office of the 

B ursar, otherwi se any credi t on the student account coul d be carri ed over to the next semester. I f a 

C ancellation of Registration is submitted to the Office of the Registrar before the official first 

day of classes the student is entitled to ful I credit of semester tuition. 

U ndergraduate students wi thdrawi ng from the uni versi ty wi 1 1 be credi ted for tui ti on and fees i n 

accordance with the f ol I owi ng schedul e 



Pri or to 1st day of cl asses 100% 
1st 10 days of cl asses 80% 

3rd week 60% 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d ^ >S Q^ 27 



4th week 


40% 


5th week 


20% 


After 5th week 


No refund 



Note Fi rst-semester freshmen who recei veTitle IV aid and who withdraw wi 1 1 receive a refund i n 

accordance wi th federal regul ati ons. 

Prior to the first day of classes, if f ul l-ti me undergraduates drop a course or courses, thereby 

changi ng the total number of credits for whi ch they are regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the 

semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s of the per-credi t- hour fee for part-ti me students. H owever, i f 

students I ater add a course or courses thereby changi ng the total number of credits for whi ch they are 

regi stered to 12 or more, they wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or the difference between per-credi t- hour fees pai d and 

the general fees for f ul I -ti me undergraduates. 

If during thefirst five days of dasBesfull-ti me undergraduates drop a course or courses thereby 

changi ng the total number of credits for whi ch they are regi stered to 11 or fewer, charges for the 

semester wi 1 1 be assessed on the basi s of part-ti me charges pi us 20% of the difference between the 

f ul I -ti me fees and appropri ate part-ti me charges. After the f i rst f i ve days of cl asses, there i s no 

refund for changi ng from f ul I -ti me to part-ti me status. Students who regi ster as part-ti me 

undergraduate students and apply for a refund for courses dropped duri ng thef i rst week of classes 

wi 1 1 be given an 80% refund. No refund wi 1 1 be made for courses dropped thereafter. 

No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when students officially 

wi thdraw from the uni versi ty or when they are gi ven permi ssi on by the appropri ate off i ci al s of the 

uni versi ty to move from the resi dence hal I s and/or to di sconti nue dining hall privil eges. I n these 

cases, the room ref und wi 1 1 be computed by mul ti pi y i ng the number of peri ods remai ni ng by the pro 

rata weekl y rate after adj usti ng for a servi ce charge. Refunds to students havi ng f ul I board contracts 

wi 1 1 be cal cul ated inasirrilar manner. N o room and/or board refunds wi 1 1 be made after the 14th 

week of the semester. Students are rerri nded that reservati ons for room and board must be cancel ed 

by the date publ i shed i n the resi dence hal I and di ni ng servi ces agreemert(s) . 

I n compurj ng refunds to students who have received the benefit of scholarshi ps and loans from 

uni versi ty funds, the computati on wi 1 1 be made to return the maxi mum amount to the schol arshi p and 

loan accounts without loss to the university. 



OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

0102 Lee Bui I ding 
301-314-9000 
301-405-9265 
urrfinaid@umd.edu 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state, and institutional 
f i nanci al assistance programs, and, i n cooperation with other university offices, parti ci pates i n the 
awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students. The pri mary responsi bi I ity for fi nanci ng attendance 
atthe University of Maryland, College Park, lies with students and families. Scholarships, grants, 
I oans, and work-study positi ons are awarded on the basi s of acaderri c abi I ity and/or f i nanci al need as 
determi ned by a federal needs anal ysi s system 1 1 i s the i ntent of OSFA to provi de assi stance to 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 28 



students who rri ght not otherwi se be abl e to pursue col I ege studi es due to f i nanci al constrai nts. 

Fi nanci al aid funds are I i rri ted; therefore, al I new, readmitted, and returni ng students must fol low 
these steps to recei ve pri ori ty consi derati on for f i nanci al ai d: 

1. Student adrri ssi ons appl i cati ons and al I necessary supporti ng documents to the Off i ce of 
Admissions by the appropriate deadl i nes (Deadl i nes are listed i n Chapter 1) 

2. Completea Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) afterj anuary 1. The FAFSA is 
avai I abl e on the OSF A web si te at www.financialaid.umd.edu. A new F A F SA i s requi red for 
each acaderri c year of the student's enrol I mart. 

New students should not wait to be admitted beforefilingtheFAFSA. A financial 

ai d appl i cati on has no beari ng on a students adrri ssi on appl i cati on. H owever, students 
wi 1 1 not recei ve f i nal consi derati on f or ai d unti I they are adrri tted to a degree program 

3. C om p l e te the FAFSA no later than February X so that it is received by the federal 
processor by February 15. Applying online helps to expedite the process. I ncome for the 

previ ous year may be esti mated initially and corrected I ater on the Student A i d Report 
(SAR). 

Applications received before February 15 will be given priority consideration. 

General Regulations Appl icaHeto All Forms of Aid 

Full-Time Status. For most types of aid, students must attempt at least 12 credit hours through the 
schedul e adj ustment peri od each semester i n order to recei ve the f ul I f i nanci al ai d award. PI ease 
refer to the standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) when consi deri ng droppi ng below 12 
credi t hours for any gi ven semester. PI ease vi si t the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d to revi ew the 
Satisfactory Academic Progress policy at www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu . 

C itizenshi p Status. I n order to be d i gi bl e f or federal , state, or uni versi ty f i nanci al assi stance, 
students must be United States citizens or eligible non-citizens. 

Default/Owe Refund: Students cannot be i n default on an educati onal I oan, nor can they owe any 
refund on a Pel I Grant or Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously awarded 
at any post-secondary i nstitution. 

Degree-Seeking; Students must be worki ng toward a degree or certificate. Students must be 
admitted to the university as "degree-seeki ng." 

Satisfactory Progress: Students must be maki ng sati sfactory progress toward a degree or certif i cate 
accordi ng to the Standards for Sati sfactory Acaderri c Progress (SA P) publ i shed i n the Schedul e of 
Classes. PI ease visit the Office of Student Financial Aid to review the Satisfactory Academic 
Progress pol i cy at www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu . 

Selective Service: To receive federal financial aid, male students must register with Selective 
Servi ce if they are at I east 18 years ol d and born after December 31, 1959, unl ess they are not 
requi red by I aw. The federal government wi 1 1 verify compl i ance of thi s regi strati on requi rement 
Students who have questi ons about Sd ecti ve Servi ce regi strati on may contact the Sd ecti ve Servi ce 
at 847-688-6888/1-888-655-1825 or www.sss.gov. 

Receiving a Non-University Award: If a student recdves assistance (scholarship or loan) from a 
non- uni versi ty source, the uni versi ty may reduce the f i nanci al ai d awarded by the uni versi ty . 1 1 i s the 
students responsi bi I i ty to noti f y the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d of al I outsi de awards. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 29 



C hange in Financial Situation: 1 1 i s the student's responsi bi I ity to notify the Off i ce of Student 
F i nanci al A i d of any changes to hi s or her f i nanci al ci rcumstances duri ng the year. 

Reappl ication Requi rement N eed- based assi stance i s not automati cal I y renewed from year to 
year. All students requesting need- based aid must reapply by submitting a new or renewal FAFSA 
annual I y . Such reappl i cati on must i ndi cate conti nued f i nanci al need and mai ntai n Sati sf actory 
Academi c Progress (SA P) . PI ease vi sit the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d to revi ew the Sati sfactory 
Academic Progress policy at www.financialaid.umd.edu . 

Award Policy: F i nanci al ai d i s normal I y a combi nati on of grants, I oans, and student empl oyment. 
The financial aid "package" isdeterrrined by the avail ability of financial aid and the financial 
ci rcumstances of each student. 1 1 i s not necessary to make any sped al appl i cati on for uni versi ty 
grants. The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d wi 1 1 deterrri ne awards that best fit the needs and 
qual i f i cati ons of the candi dates. 

Estimating Educational Cost 

Costs of Attendance B udgets are esti mates of the educati oral expenses i ncurred by students duri ng 
the ni ne-month academic year. These budgets i ncl ude di rect university charges (tuition, fees and on 
campus room and board) and esti mates of i ndi rect expenses (transportati on, books, suppl i es, 
rri seel I aneous I i vi ng expenses, and off-campus room and board) . 

Off campus cost of I i vi ng expenses are deterrri ned based on the average room and board charges for 
thelocal area. These are indirect costs, not billed by the University. 

Actual Col I ege Park tuiti on and fees can be found by contacti ng the Off i ce of the B ursar at 
www.umd.edu/bursar . 



Dependent student livi ng on campus 




(not with parent/rdativ^ 




Tuition and Fees 




1 n- State M aryl and Resi dent 


$8,918 


Out-of- State DC, other states, other countries 


$27,297 


Room 


$5,918 


Board 


$3,975 


Books 


$1,130* 


Personal and Transportation expenses 


$3,162* 


Subtotal In- State 


$18,811 


Total In- State 


$23,103 


Subtotal Out-of-State 


$37,190 


Total Out-of-State 


$41,482 


Dependent student commuting from parents h 


one 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 30 



Tuition and Fees 






1 n- State M aryl and Resi dent 




$8,918 


Out-of- State DC, other states, 


other countries 


$27,297 


Room 




$1,110* 


Board 




$2,120* 


Books 




$1,130* 


Personal and Transportation expenses 


$3,824* 


Subtotal In- State 




$8,918 


Total In- State 




$17,102 


Subtotal Out-of-State 




$27,297 


Total Out-of-State 
Dependent Student living off ca 


mpus 


$35,481 



(not with parent/rdativ^ 

Tuition and Fees 

I n-State M aryl and Resi dent $8,918 

Out-of-State DC, other states, other countries $27,297 

Room $8,469* 

Board $3,975* 

Books $1,130* 

Personal and Transportati on expenses $3,824* 

Subtotal In-State $8,918 

Total In-State $26,316 

Subtotal Out-of-State $29,297 

Total Out-of-State $44,695 

* These f i gures are averages and wi 1 1 vary from student to student. They are i ndi rect costs not bi 1 1 ed 
by the bursar. 



MERIT BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

1135 Lee Building 
301-314-9000 
301-405-9265 
sf a-schol arshi ps@umd.edu 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 31 



www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

Scholarships 

Several schol arshi ps are avai I abl e to the hi ghest-achi evi ng students at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, 
Col I ege Park. Two types of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e those based sol d y on acaderri c or creati ve 
talent (merit- based), and those based on f i nanci al need. The d igi bi I ity criteria for the different 
schol arshi ps are listed bdow. Please also seethe I ist of departmental schol arshi ps at the end of this 
chapter. Students are encouraged to contact the off i ce or department responsi bl e f or sd ecrj ng the 
red pi ents for more i nf orrnati on on these programs. C urrent i nf ormati on about schol arshi ps i s al so 
avai lable on the Web at www. adrni ssi ons. umd.edu . 

Banneker/Key Scholarship: TheUniversity of Maryland seeks to identify and sdectsomeof the 
bri ghtest hi gh school seni ors i n the nati on to conti nue thd r educati on as Banneker/Key Schol ars. 
There are two award I evd s for Banneker Key Schol arshi ps. The f i rst award I evd covers the costs of 
tuition, mandatory fees, room and board, and a book al lowance each year for four years. The second 
award I evd provi des a parti al schol arshi p to go towards tuition and a book al I owance each year for 
four years. Schol arshi p red pi ents wi 1 1 al so be adrni tted to the H onors Col I ege and wi 1 1 be afforded 
many other opportuniti es as they parti ci pate i n i ntd I ectual enri chment programs. For f ul I 
consi derati on, students must subrri t an adrni ssi on appl i cati on, appl i cati on fee, off i ci al transcri pt, 
essay, recommendations, and official copies of SAT or ACT scores to the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions by November 1 for thefol lowi ng academic year. Sdected serrif i nal ists are given a 
personal i ntervi ew by the Banneker/Key Sd ecrj on committee. Factors such as a candi date's 
i nvol vement i n communi ty servi ce, tal ents or ski 1 1 s, I eadershi p, and character al I pi ay a part i n the 
f i nal awards. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons at www, adrni ssi ons. umd.edu for 
more information. 

Presidents Scholarship: This award provi des talented prospective freshmen with scholarship 
support for four years. Awards rangi ng from $2,000 to $12,000 per year are offered to i ncorri ng 
freshmen. Students are sdected through the admissions process with pri mary consideration given to 
academic performance in high school (high school courses and achievement), results of standardized 
test scores (SAT or ACT), extracurricular activities, awards, honors, recommendations, and the 
essay. For f ul I consi derati on, students must submit a compl ete appl i cati on for adrri ssi on by 
November 1. Contact the Office of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons at www, adrni ssi ons. umd.edu for 
more information. 

Deans' Scholarship: This award provi des talented prospective freshmen with scholarship support 
for one to two years. Awards rangi ng from $1,500 for one year to $4,500 for two years are offered to 
i ncorri ng freshmen. To be consi dered, students must submit a compl ete appl i cati on for adrri ssi on 
by November 1. Contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at www.adrrissions.umd.edu for 
more information. 

President s Transfer Scholarship: This schol arshi p is a two-year $5,000 per year schol arshi p for 
transfer students. Students do not have to fi 1 1 out a separate appl i cati on to be consi dered as they wi 1 1 
be evaluated based on thd r application to the University of Maryland. The scholarship will be 
awarded to the most competi ti ve transfer students wi th the strongest acaderri c records and col I ege 
grade poi nt averages. Students who are awarded the schol arshi p wi 1 1 reed ve noti f i cati on by mai I 
about two weeks after they reed ve thd r I etter of adrri ssi on. Contact the Offi ce of U ndergraduate 
A drri ssi ons at www.adrri ssi ons. umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

Regents Scholars Progjamc The Regents Schol ars Program recognizes the extraordi nary 

achi evement of outstaridi ng freshmen students. N ew awards are made each year i n the amount of f ul I 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 32 



i n-state tuition, mandatory fees, room, board, and a $1000 sti pend. Red pi ents are automati cal I y 
admitted to the Honors Col lege. A select number of the top high school scholars i n the state wi 1 1 be 
consi dered for thi s most presti gi ous award. A compl ete adrni ssi on appl i cati on, appl i cati on fee, 
official transcri pt, essay, recommendations, and SAT or ACT scores must be submitted to the Office 
of Undergraduate Admissions by November 1 for consideration for the Regents Scholars Program 
for the f ol I owi ng acaderri c year. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Adrni ssi ons at 
www, adrni ssi ons. umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

National Merit Schdarship/College-Sponsored Merit Award: The National M erit Scholarshi p 

Corporati on ( N M SC ) has a vari ety of schol arshi ps that are awarded to students based on acaderri c 
performance. The University of Maryland serves as a sponsoring institution for prospective 
freshmen sd ected by N M SC to reed ve the Col I ege-Sponsored M eri t Schol arshi p award. Students 
sd ected for the U M Sponsored M eri t award wi 1 1 reed ve a four-year renewabl e schol arshi p rangi ng 
from $750 - $2,500/year. All finalists shoul d f ol I ow N M SC's i nstrucrj ons for f i rst choi ce 
notificati ons careful I y and observe deadl i nes to remai n d i gi bl e f or awards. 

The National M erit Scholarshi p also awards Corporate-Sponsored merit scholarshi ps and National 
Achievement awards. For more i information on the National M erit Scholarshi p program please visit: 
www, nati oral meri t org . 

Weinberg Regents Scholarship: I n order to conti nue the commitment to outstandi ng students, the 
Board of Regents has desi gnated the Wd nberg Regents Schol arshi p to be awarded to a M aryl and 
community col I ege transfer student. To be sd ected for thi s award, the transfer student must have 
excepti onal qual i f i cati ons, i ncl udi ng achi evement of a 4. grade poi nt average, compl eti on of the 
A ssoci ate of A rts degree at a M aryl and communi ty col I ege, evi dence of creati ve and i ntd I ectual 
acti vi ti es or schol arl y potenti al , and have been adrni tted to one of the U ni versi ty System of 
M aryl and i restitutions. The deadl i nefor subnitti ng the candidate's appl ication material is J une 15. 
The wi nner may reed ve the schol arshi p for two years, total i ng no more than four semesters 
i ncl udi ng summer sessi ons. F or i nf ormati on, contact the U ni versi ty System of M aryl and 
Adrni ni strati on at 301-445-1992. 

Transfer Academic Excellence Scholarship: These awards are avai I abl e to outstandi ng students 
transferri ng from M aryl and community col I eges. The awards cover i n-state tuition for two years of 
undergraduate study. To be d i gi bl e students must have an overal I grade poi nt average of 3.5 for al I 
col I ege work attempted, and must have compl eted an A ssoci ate of A rts degree or the enti re f i rst two 
years of courses for the maj or i n whi ch the student expects to enrol I . Students who have previ ousl y 
attended the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, are i nd i gi bl e for thi s schol arshi p. Candi date 
norri nati on forms are avai I abl e i n earl y J anuary from the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons or 
from community col I ege advi sors. The deadl i ne for reed pt of the appl i cati on, off i ci al transcri pts, 
and schol arshi p materi al s i s earl y- M arch. Contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A drri ssi ons at 
www.adrrissions.umd.edu for more i nf ormati on. 

Honors Scholarshi p: H onors students al ready attendi ng M aryl and are d i gi bl e to appl y for one of 
these $500 awards. To be consi dered, students must be f i rst or second year students, have at I east a 
3.2 grade poi nt average, be maki ng sati sfactory progress toward the compl eti on of requi rements for 
an H onors ci tati on, and di spl ay f i nanci al need. To appl y appl i cants must subrri t an essay on thd r 
acaderri c goal s and pi ans for achi evi ng them PI ease note that Regents, Banneker-Key, and 
Presi dent's Schol arshi p red pi ents are not d i gi bl e f or the H onors Schol arshi ps. For more 
i nf ormati on pi ease contact the H onors Col I ege at 301-405-6771. 

University of Maryland Departmental Scholarships: Some Col I eges and departments at the 
uni versi ty offer a vari ety of meri t schol arshi ps. M ost departmental schol arshi ps requi re a student to 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 33 



have a nri ni mum grade poi rt average of 3. and be regi stered f or a mi ni mum of 12 credi ts per 
semester. For information regarding departmental scholarships, pi ease contact the appropriate 
Col I ege or department. 

Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships These are competitive scholarships which are 
awarded annual I y . Pri mary consi derati on wi 1 1 be gi ven to enteri ng freshmen and transfer students 
from community col I eges that have outstandi ng tal ent i n art, dance, musi c, or theater. The 
schol arshi ps cover i n-state tuiti on and mandatory fees and are renewabl e for up to three years based 
upon an acceptabl e I eve! of performance as def i ned by the respecti ve departments. A ddi ti onal 
appl i cati on materi al s and i nf ormati on about requi red audi ti ons are avai I abl e di recti y from the 
Departments of A rt, Dance, M usi c and Theatre. 

Maryland State Scholarships The Maryland State Schol arshi p A drrini strati on (MSSA), located in 
A nnapol i s, awards both need- and merit-based schol arshi ps to M aryl and resi dents. There are many 
different programs avai I able, including the Guaranteed Access Grant, Educational Assistance Grant, 
the Senatori al Schol arshi p, the H ouse of Del egates Schol arshi p, and the D i sti ngui shed Schol ar 
Award. Y ou may obtai n more i nf ormati on about these and other awards by cal I i ng M SSA at 
800-974-0203. All Maryland resi dents are expected to apply for State scholarship assistance. Initial 
appl i cati on for many of the awards i s made through the F ree A ppl i cati on for Federal Student A i d 
(FAFSA). Please notethat filing the FA FSA is sufficient to apply for most Maryland State 
Schol arshi ps at U M D, although some may requi re additi onal appl i cati on forms. The appl i cati on 
deadl i ne for most programs i s M arch 1. The FA FSA i s avai I abl e on the OSFA web site 
at www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu . 

Scholarships from Other States Several states have red procal agreements with the State of 
M aryl and. Students who are resi dents of these states may recei ve funds for study i n d i gi bl e 
post-secondary i nstituti ons i n M aryl and. I nterested students shoul d contact thei r state schol arshi p 
agenci es for i nf ormati on. 

Schdarshi p Searches A broad range of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e from pri vate sources. U sual I y, 
these awards are not as wel I publ icized as state and university programs. Therefore, students should 
conduct a schol arshi p search to I ocate such sources. The U ni versi ty of M aryl and offers access to 
several servi ces to students to ai d them i n thei r searches. A ccess our websi te at 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu/schol arshi ps to use these servi ces. 



NEED-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

0102 Lee Bui I ding 
301-314-9000 
301-405-9265 
unrfinaid@umd.edu 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

Grants 

The Office of Student Financial Aid administers several grant programs for undergraduates. Awards 
are made based on f i nanci al need as deterrri ned by the F A F SA . G rants do not have to be repai d. 
Access our web site at www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu f or more i nf ormati on. 

Federal Pell Grant This grant provides a "foundation" of f i nancial aid, to which aid from other 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 34 



sources may be added. Only undergraduates who are seeki ng thei r f i rst bachelor's degree and have 
excepti onal need may recei ve a Federal Pel I G rant. A 1 1 undergraduates wi 1 1 be consi dered for thi s 
grant regardl ess of when thei r appl i cati ons were recei ved. Students may recei ve the Federal Pel I 
G rant for I ess than f ul I -ti me attendance, al though the award wi 1 1 be pro- rated based on the number 
of credits attempted. Awards range from $602 to $5,550. 

Teacher Education Assistance for Col lege and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant 

Through the Col I ege Cost Reducti on and Access Act of 2007, Congress created the Teacher 
Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant Program that provides 
grants of up to $4,000 per year to students who i ntend to teach i n a publ i c or pri vate d ementary or 
secondary school that serves students from I ow-i ncome f ami I i es. 

To receive theTEACH Grant students must compl ete the F A FSA, beaU.S. citizen or eligible 
non-citizen, enrol led as an undergraduate, post- baccalaureate or graduate student, enrol led i n a 
coursework necessary to begi n a career i n teachi ng or pi an to compl ete such coursework, mai ntai n a 
cumulative 3.25 GPA and sign aTEACH Grant Agreement to Serve. Questions regarding the 
TEACH Grant Program can be di rected to the Office of Student Fi nanci al Aid. 

I nstitutional Grants The university awards grants to f ul I — ti me students who demonstrate fi nanci al 
need and meet OSFA 's pri ority appl i cati on deadl i ne of February 15. There are three funds from 
whi ch i nsti tuti onal grants are awarded, the U M Schol arshi p, F rederi ck Dougl ass G rant and the U M 
G rant. OSF A sd ects the red pi ents of these awards based on avai lability of funds and the 
qual if i cati ons of the appl i cants. The U M Schol arshi p may be awarded to undergraduates with 
demonstrated need and high academic achievement. The UM Grant and Frederick Douglas Grant 
may be awarded to any undergraduate with demonstrated need. Award amounts for these programs 
range from $500 to $4,000. 

Self-Help 

F i nanci al ai d al so consi sts of sd f - hd p assi stance such as empl oy mart and student I oan programs. 
M ost of these programs are awarded based on need as determi ned by the FA FSA . Access our web 
si te at www.financialaid.umd.edu for addi ti onal i nf ormati on. 

Federal Work-Study: The Federal Work- Study (FWS) Program provides students with the 
opportunity to earn money to meet thd r educati onal and personal expenses. M oney earned from the 
FWS program does not have to be pai d back. To be consi dered for FWS, students must meet 
OSFA's priority application deadline of February 15. This award is need-based and may range from 
$800 to $2,000. Pay rates depend on the I evd of compl exity of the work, but wi 1 1 be at I east the 
federal rri ni mum wage. Li ke al I university employees, FWS employees reed ve a paycheck every 
other week for the hours worked. M ost FWS j obs are on campus, though opportuniti es exi st through 
the Community Servi ce Program for FWS students to work off campus at several Federal 
Government Agenci es. The number of hours students may work i s I i rrited to 20 per week whi I e 
school i s i n sessi on and 40 per week duri ng vacati ons and summer break. 

Paid I internships: Students with pai d i nternshi ps si gn a contract at the begi nni ng of the semester 
that states the payment amount for the number of hours to be worked duri ng that semester. The 
payment amount i s advanced to the students account at the start of each semester. Thi s program 
differs from Federal Work- Study i n that students reed ve al I "wages" at the start of each semester, as 
opposed to a bi - weekl y pay check, and those funds are appl i ed di recti y to the student's account. 
Several off i ces and departments on campus, i ncl udi ng ShutrJ e U M , Resi denti al Facilities, and Di ni ng 
Servi ces, offer pai d i nternshi ps. Students shoul d contact the department or off i ce for whi ch they are 
i nterested i n worki ng. 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 35 



Federal Perkins Loan: The Perki ns loan is a low-i nterest rate (5%) loan for students with 
excepti onal f i nanci al need. This isa I oan borrowed from the school , and must be repai d. To be 
d i gi bl e, students must meet OSFA 's pri ority appl i cati on deadl i ne of February 15. The amount of the 
award wi 1 1 depend upon the students need and may range from $200 to $1,000. New borrowers 
(those who f i rst receive a federal Perki ns Loan after J uly 1, 1988) have a grace period of ni ne 
months after graduati ng or I eavi ng school before they must begi n repayment of thei r federal Perki ns 
Loan(s) . I nterest wi 1 1 begi n accrui ng at the ti me of repayment. Thi s I oan i s i nterest-f ree whi I e 
students are attendi ng school and enrol I ed at I east half ti me i n a degree-seeki ng program 

Direct Stafford Loan: Thi s i s a I ow-i nterest-rate I oan for students who attend at I east half-ti me. 
Application is made through the school's financial ai d office via the FA FSA. Eligibility for this loan 
i s based on need, not credit worthi ness. Thi s I oan i s borrowed by the student and must be repai d. 

There are two types of Direct Stafford Loans: subsidized and unsubsidized. The Direct Stafford 
subsi di zed I oan i s awarded to students wi th demonstrated f i nanci al need; thi s I oan i s i nterest-f ree 
whi I e students are attendi ng school and enrol I ed at I east hal f -ti me i n a degree-seeki ng program. 
Students who do not demonstrate f i nanci al need, or who do not demonstrate suffi ci ent need to 
borrow a fully Direct Stafford subsidized loan, may borrow a Direct Stafford unsubsidized loan. The 
Di rect Stafford unsubsidized loan is i nterest beari ng. Students borrowi ng a Di rect Stafford 
unsubsi di zed I oan wi 1 1 be requi red to repay the pri nci pi e and any i nterest that may accrue duri ng 
school attendance. All students who want to apply for either Di rect Stafford loan must complete the 
FA FSA. As of J uly 1, 2012, the Direct Stafford subsidized and unsubsidized loans will have a 6.8% 
fixed i nterest rate. Students who graduate or drop below half-ti me status are granted a six- month 
grace peri od before repayment of the Di rect Stafford I oan i s requi red. 

The f ol I owi ng are the maxi mum I oan amounts per acaderri c year: $5,500 for undergraduates with 
freshman status, $6,500 for undergraduates attai ni ng sophomore status, and $7,500 for 
undergraduate students who attai n j uni or or seni or status. I f students do not demonstrate suffi ci ent 
need to borrow the maxi mum Di rect Stafford subsidized loan, they may borrow the difference i n a 
Direct Stafford unsubsidized loan. The maximum borrowing limitfor most undergraduates is 
$31,000. 

Direct PLUS (Parent Loans For Undergraduate Students) Loan: This is a non- need- based loan, 
whi ch parents may borrow to hd p defray the cost of thd r dependent chi I dren's educati on. The Di rect 
PLUS enabl es parents to borrow the f ul I yearl y cost of attendance (as deterrri ned by the school ) 
minus all other financial aid. Otherwise, there is no yearly or cumulative borrowing limit. As of J uly 
1, 2011, the student is requi red to complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in 
order to appl y f or the D i rect PL U S I oan. After the F A F SA i s compl eted, borrowers must subrri t the 
Di rect PL U S I oan appl i cati on to the school for cal cul ati on and certif i cati on of the maxi mum I oan 
amount that the parent may borrow per student per year. The Di rect PL U S I oan appl i cati on i s 
located on the OSFA websiteatwww.financialaid.umd.edu and sdect the "Printable Forms" link. 

The Di rect PL U S i s granted to borrowers based on credit- worthi ness as deterrri ned by the 
Department of Educati on whom the borrower sd ects. The D i rect PL U S I oan has a 7.9% f i xed 
interest rate. The borrower has the option of beginning repayment on the Direct PLUS loan dther 60 
days after the loan is f ul ly disbursed or not unti I six (6) months after the dependent student on whose 
behalf the parent borrowed ceases to be enrol I ed on at I east a half-ti me basi s. 



COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 36 



0102 Lee Building 

301-314-9000 

301-405-9265 

sfa-schol arshi ps@uird.edu 

www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu 

Some U M col I eges and departments offer men t- based schol arshi ps. M ost departments wi 1 1 onl y 
consi der students who enrol I for 12 credits per semester, and who have a grade poi nt average of at 
I east 3. 0. Some of these schol arshi ps are open to prospecti ve freshman and transfer students. Some 
of them are only open to continuing UM students. For additional information regarding 
departmental schol arshi ps pi ease contact the appropri ate col I ege or department or vi si t www.fi nanci al c 
www.fi nanci al ai d. umd.edu/Schol arhi ps/departmental , html . 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

Agricultural & Resource Economics 

A ni mal and A vi an Sci ences 

B i ol ogi cal Resources E ngi neeri ng 

L andscape A rchi tecture 

Natural Resource Sciences 

Natural Resources Management Program 

Nutrition & Food Science 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

American Studies 

Art 

A it H i story & A rchaeol ogy 

Asian & East European Languages and Cultures 

Classics 

Communication 

Comparative Literature 

Dance 

E ngl i sh L anguage and L i terature 

French & Italian Languages and Literatures 

Germanic Studies 

History 

J ewish Studies Program 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Spanish & Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 

COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Af ri can A meri can Studi es 

Afro-American Studies 

Anthropology 

Criminology & Criminal Justice 

Economics 

Geography 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d P 3 ^ 37 



Government and Pol itics 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

J oi nt Program i n Survey M ethodol ogy 

Psychology 

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, AND NATURAL SCIENCES 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Science 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics 

Chemistry & Biochemistry 

Computer Science 

Entomology 

Geology 

Mathematics 

Physics 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Counsel ing& Personnel Services 

C urri cul um & I nstructi on 

H uman Devd opment ( I nsti tute for C hi I d Study) 

M easuremert, Stati sti cs & E val uati on 

Special Education 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

Family Studies 
Health Education 
Kinesiology 

A.J AMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

A erospace E ngi neeri ng 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 

E I ectri cal and Computer E ngi neeri ng 

F i re Protecti on E ngi neeri ng 

M ateri al s and N ud ear E ngi neeri ng 

Mechanical Engineering 

Reliability Engineering 

ROBERT H. SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Accounting 

Deci si on and I nf ormati on Technol ogi es 

Finance 

Logistics, Business and Public Policy 

M anagement and Organi zati on 

Marketing 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING and PRESERVATION 

Architecture 

U rban Studi es and PI anni ng Program 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 



2. Fees, Expenses and F i nanci al A i d Pa 9 e 38 



Chemical Physics Program 

E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy 

Systems E ngi neeri ng 

RETURNING STUDENTS PROGRAM/COUNSELING CENTER 

Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation Scholarship 
Gerald G. Portney Memorial Scholarship 
Marilyn K. Brown Memorial Loan 
Gerald G. Portney Emergency Fund 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

A caderri c A chi evement Programs 

A i r Force Aerospace Studi es Program 

ArmyROTC 

Col I ege Park Schol ars Program 

Individual Studies Program 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program 

Letters and Sciences 

N ati onal Schol arshi ps Off i ce 

Honors College 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Alumni Association 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 39 

3. Campus Administration, Resources* and Student Services 

CAM PUS ADM INI STRATI ON 

Office of the President 

1101 M ai n Adrni ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5803 
Wal I ace D . L oh, Presi dent 
www.pre5ident.umd.edu 

The president is the chief executive officer of theUniversity of Maryland. Six vice presidents, who 
report to the presi dent, manage di ff erent di vi si ons of the campus adrni ni strati on. The Department of 
I ntercol I egi ate Athl eti cs, and the M aryl and F i re and Rescue I nsti tute report to the Off i ce of the 
President. The University Senate, a representative legislative body of the university, advises the 
president on academic and other matters. 

Academic Affairs 

1119 M ai n Adrri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5252 
301-405-8195 

Seni or V i ce Presi dent and Provost: A nn G . Wyl i e 
provost@umd.edu 
www. provost, umd.edu 

The Senior Vice President and Provost is the chief academic officer of the university with 
responsi bi I ity for gui di ng the acaderri c devd opment and di recti on of the i nstituti on i n accordance 
with the university's mission; ensuri ng that our programs and faculty are of the highest cal i ber; 
supporti ng the diversity of our students, faculty, and staff as a special strength; and promoti ng 
academic excel lence across the university. The deans of the 12 col leges and schools at the University 
report di recti y to the Provost, as do the deans for U ndergraduate Studi es, the G raduate School , and 
the libraries, theChief Diversity Officer, the Associate Vice Presi dent for I nternational Affairs, and 
the Executi ve D i rector of the I nsti tute for B i osci ence and B i otechnol ogy Research. T he Seni or V i ce 
Presi dent and Provost oversees the devd opment, revi ew, and i mpl ementati on of al I academi c 
pol i ci es and regul ati ons; consul ts cl osd y wi th the U ni versi ty Senate and other f acul ty advi sory 
groups on academic programs and policies; and serves as I iai son with other university divisions i n 
strategi c and I org- range pi anni ng. 

Administrative Affairs 

1132 M ai n Adrri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-1105 

Robert M . Specter, Vice President & Chief Financial Officer 
www.adrrinaffairs.umd.edu 

TheOfficeof the Vice Presidentfor Administrative Affairs and Chief Financial Officer is 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 4® 



responsi bl e for the eff ecti ve management of the physi cal , f i seal , and staff support resources of the 
i nstitution. The office also provides campus safety and security, envi ronmental health and safety, 
materi al s management, and other necessary support servi ces. Of parti cul ar i nterest to students are 
the community awareness and security programs offered by the Department of Publ ic Safety, the 
i nf ormati on and assi stance servi ces provi ded by the B ursar for concerns of students regardi ng 
uni versi ty bi 1 1 i ngs, and the campus 1 efforts rd ated to sustai nabi I i ty . 

Student Affairs 

2108 Mitchell Building 

301-314-8428 

301-314-9606 

Linda M. Clement, Vice President 

www.studentaffai rs.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for Student Aff ai rs provi des admi ni strati ve I eadershi p for 15 
departments whi ch oversee student I if e. The off i ce serves as a general poi nt of contact for students 
and the; r f ami I i es regardi ng housi ng, di ni ng, transportati on, recreati on, wd I ness and non-academi c 
student servi ces. I n addi ti on, the off i ce provi des support for the Seni or Counci I , Parents and F ami I y 
Affairs, and Orricron Ddta Kappa. 



Office of Diversity Education and Compliance 

2411 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-2838 

301-314-9992 

GloriaJ . Bouis 

gbouis@umd.edu 

www.odec.umd.edu 

The Office of Diversity Education and Compl iance(ODEC) has campus-wide responsi bi I ities rdated 
to diversity and equity and the U ni versi ty of M aryland. 

Rd ated to equity and compl i ance, ODEC i s responsi bl e f or i niti ati ng acti on and provi di ng servi ce i n 
compl i ance with instituti onal , state, and federal di recti ves to provi de equal educati on and 
employment opportunities for university students, faculty, and staff members. We also monitor the 
outcomes of acti ons taken i n thi s regard, reporti ng our f i ndi ngs to the Presi dent, the Campus Senate, 
and to the campus community at large. We provide students, faculty, and staff with general 
i nf ormati on and trai ni ng on equity efforts and on the status of equity and compl i ance matters at the 
university (eg., sexual harassment prevention trai ni ng). Students, faculty, or staff havi ng a concern 
about possi ble i nequities or who requi re dispute resol ution services (eg., mediation, arbitration, etc.) 
i n educati onal or empl oyment matters, or who wi sh to regi ster a compl ai nt, may contact dther the 
Campus Compl i ance Officer at 301-405-2839, or a member of the Campus 1 Equity Counci I (see 
Equity Counci I i n chapter 3). 

ODEC also advises and assists the President and the Provost i n the promotion of the university 
mission as it rdates to multicultural ism and i ncl usion, broadly conceptual i zed (i .e, race (incl usi ve of 
color and creed); ethnicity; language national or geographic origin; socioeconomic class (inclusive 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 41 



of educational level, employment status, and familial configuration); sex and gender; gender identity 
and expression; sexual orientation; physical, developmental, and psychological ability; religious, 
spiritual, faith- based, or secular affiliation; age and generation; physical appearance, environmental 
concern; and, on the basi s of the exerci se of ri ghts secured by the F i rst A mendment) . M ore 
sped f i cal I y, we faci I i tate the bui I di ng of cooperati ve partnershi ps across campus among vari ous 
constituencies of students, faculty, and staff on these issues and are oriented toward the real ization of 
an i ncl usi ve, and therefore, aff i rrri ng envi ronmert for every citizen of the university community. 

To meet these equity and diversity goals, ODEC sponsors numerous i nitiati ves that promote 
i ntergroup rd ati onshi p bui I di ng, cultural competence, sexual harassment and hate cri mes 
prevention, multicultural organizational development, and processes complaints of discrimination 
and harassment foil owing procedures set forth in the University's Code on Equity, Diversity, and 
I ncl usi on (the compl ete text of thi s Code may be found i n chapter 10) . 

ODEC's efforts are di rected toward the development of our students, faculty, and staff becorri ng 
pri nci pi ed I eaders, predi sposed to progressi ve acti on; becorri ng democrat] c ci ti zens as outstandi ng 
i n what they do, as i n who they are, with respect to thd r commitment to f urtheri ng the tenets of 
equi ty and j usti ce for al I . 



Equity Council 

1119 M ai n Adrri ni strati on B ui I di ng 
301-405-5793 
Dr. Robert Waters 
rewaters@umd.edu 
www. presi dent. umd.edu/EqCo/ 
301-405-0805 

The Equity Counci I serves as an advi sory group to the Presi dent and supports the I ongstandi ng and 
continuous goal of the University of Maryland to bea national leader in recruiting and retaining a 
diverse community of faculty, staff and students. The Counci I provides leadershi p i n the articulation 
and devd opmert of aff i rmati ve acti on pol i ci es and procedures for the campus communi ty . A 
particular focus of the Equity Counci I is to review and recommend, as appropriate, search and 
sdection pol icies and procedures for the university and its col leges and departments. The Counci I 
consi sts of equity adrri ni strators from each V i ce Presi dent and Dean's off i ce and the Off i ce of the 
President. The Special Assistant to the Presi dertfor Equity and Diversity serves as Chair of the 
Council. 

Our website (www.president.umd.edu/EqCo/) has current list of equity adrri ni strators at the 
University. 

Office of Undergraduate Studies 

2110 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-9363 

www.ugst.umd.edu 

Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 

Di rector of Adrri ni strati on and External Affai rs: Ashley Sdf ridge 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 42 



Associate Dean for General Education: Douglas Roberts 

Associate Dean: Robert Gaines 

Assistant Deans: Deborah Reid Bryant, Lisa Kid y, Kathryn Robinson, Ann Smith 

Assi starts to the Dean: M ark K uhn, Laura SI avi n 

Through its many programs, the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students 

at the University and the faculty and staff that support the undergraduate mission of the campus. The 

Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i s the pri mary di vi si on at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and responsi bl e 

for I eadershi p and oversi ght of undergraduate curri cul ar and co-curri cul ar educati on. 

University Relations 

2119 M ai n Adrri ni strati on B ui I di ng 

301-405-4680 

Peter Wei I er, V i ce Presi dent 

www.urhome.umd.edu 

The Division of University Relations conducts a variety of programs to share news, buildties, and 
raise philanthropic support for the University of Maryland. Units of this division include 
Development, M arketi ng and Communications, U ni versity of M aryland Col lege Park Foundation 
Administration, Special Events, and Alumni Relations. University Relations is responsible for 
campus- wi de programs i n al urmi aff ai rs, publ i cati ons, f i I m and vi deo presentati ons, medi a rd ati ons, 
and management of maj or campus events. The Great Expectations campai gn to rai se $1 bi 1 1 i on i n 
pri vate support for uni versi ty pri ori ti es such as schol arshi ps and facilities, is coordi nated by 
University Rd ati ons. 

University Senate 

1100 Marie Mount Hall 
301-405-5805 
www.senate.umd.edu 

The U ni versity Senate, an i ntegral part of the U ni versity's system of shared governance, has 
representation from all segments of the campus community: faculty, staff, undergraduate students, 
and graduate students. Parti ci pati on i n the Senate or any of its 12 Standi ng Committees i s an honor 
and a responsibility. 

The f ul I Senate meets approxi matd y ni ne ti mes a year to consi der matters of concern to the 
i nsti tuti on, i ncl udi ng acaderri c i ssues, uni versi ty pol i ci es, pi ans of organi zati on, f aci I i ti es, and the 
wdf are of faculty, staff, and students. The Senate advi ses the presi dent, the chancd I or, or the Board 
of Regents as appropriate. To become an undergraduate student senator, students must be dected by 
students i n thd r col I ege or school or the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i n central i zed, onl i ne 
d ecti ons. E I ecti ons are hd d every year duri ng the spri ng semester. A 1 1 students are al so encouraged 
to parti ci pate i n Senate Standi ng Committees, such as Student Aff ai rs and Campus Affai rs. These 
committees draw membershi p from the campus community at I arge and cover every aspect of 
campus I if e and f uncti on. Detai I s about the d ecti on and committee vol unteer processes can be found 
atwww.senate.umd.edu. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 43 

ACADEMIC RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Academic Achievement Programs 

2204 Marie Mount Hal I 

301-405-4736 

301-314-9794 

Executive Director: Dr. J erry L. Lewis 

www.aap.umd.edu 

The Academic Achievement Programs (AAP) primarily provides resources and opportunities for 
I ow- i ncome individuals, first generati on col I ege students, di sabl ed students and tradi ti onal I y 
under- represented students. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es seed on i n Chapter 6. 

Ackrisaons 

Ground Floor Mitchell Building 

301-314-8385 

Assistant Vice President for Undergraduate Admissions and Enrollment Planning, Barbara Gill 

um-adrrit@umd.edu 

www.adrrissions.umd.edu 

The servi ces offered by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions are designed to meet the individual 
needs of prospective students. The office provides general information about the University of 
Maryland through brochures, letters, website, electronic communication, information sessions, 
campus tours and other personal i nteracti ons. Adrri ssi ons staff eval uate both freshman and transfer 
appl icants i n order to select qual if ied students for admission to the university. For more i nformati on 
about undergraduate admissions, see chapter 1. 

Computing Services Division of I nformati on Technology 

Phone 301-405-7700 
Fax: 301-405-0300 
oit@umd.edu 
www.oit.umd.edu 

The Division of I nformati on Technology is part of a University of Maryland students everyday 
academic and social life. The division plans, develops, supports, and maintains computing, 
networki ng, and telecommunications services for the university community to enhance both 
day-to-day academic and busi ness goals and to further the university's standard of excel lence i n 
education and research.. 

M any faculty members have i ntegrated technol ogy i nto courses, both i nsi de and outsi de of the 
cl assroom Some professors use cl i ckers to col I ect student feedback duri ng cl ass. Through ELMS, 
the university's Enterprise Learni ng M anagement System ( www.elms.umd.edu ). i nstructors can 
provi de onl i ne course materi al s, col I ect assi gnments, post grades el ectroni cal I y, and hoi d di scussi on 
sessions. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 44 



The university's robust wi rdess network (one of the nation's largest for a university our size) gives 
students the abi I i ty to connect to the I nternet from al most anywhere on campus. Every student I i vi ng 
i n a resi dence hal I al so has a dedi cated hi gh-speed data j ack to use when connect] ng to the uni versi ty 
network from hi s or her room Computer I abs across campus feature Wi ndows and M aci ntosh 
envi ronments, offer pri nti ng servi ces (from I ab or personal computers), and provi de course- rd ated 
software. TerpConnect ( www.terpconnect.umd.edu ) gives students 1GB of storage space to use for 
backi ng up f i I es, hosti ng Web pages, and more. 

The M yU M portal ( www.rry.umd.edu ) gives students a one-stop gateway to numerous university 
resources, i ncl udi ng a personal calendar and customizable RSS feeds, as wd I as everythi ng offered 
through Testudo (www.testudo. umd.edu ) -- the abi I ity to regi ster for cl asses onl i ne, see your 
financial aid status, check your grades, and more. 

The Hdp Desk (www.hdpdesk.umd.edu . 301-405-1500) is avail able to answer IT questions and 
provi de tech support, and i s accessi bl e i n person, over the td ephone, and vi a I i ve chat. The H d p 
Desk's I T Servi ce Center onl i ne resource ( www.itsc.umd.edu ) enabl es you to check and subscri be to 
servi ce al erts, as wd I as to i niti ate and track hd p requests onl i ne 24/7. 

Di scounts on computers, pri nters, software programs, and cd I ul ar devi ces and servi ce are al so 
avai I abi e to U ni versi ty of M ary I and students. V i si t th e www.oit.umd.edu/techsavings for more 
information. 



Education Abroad 

1125 Holzapfd 
(Main Phone) 301-314-7746 
(Fax) 301-314-9135 
educati onabroad@umd.edu 
www. umd.edu/studyabroad 
Receptionist: 301-314-7473 

Education Abroad provides international, academically- based experiences in support of students' 
personal , prof essi onal and i ntd I ectual devd opment. Programs are desi gned to promote i ntercultural 
competence, di sci pi i nary schol arshi p and ford gn I anguage acqui sition. Educati on A broad i nspi res 
and i nf orms students, equi ppi ng them wi th the knowl edge and ski 1 1 s to eff ecti vd y engage wi th I ocal 
and global communities and become cultural ly perceptive citizens. These outcomes are cultivated 
and sustained by: 

I denti f y i ng and devd opi ng safe, aff ordabl e, acaderri cal I y ri gorous, geographi cal I y di verse, 
culturally chall engi ng and transf orrri ng study abroad programs across a wi de range of di sci pi i nes 

• Advi si ng students i n the sd ectj on of suitabl e programs 

• Prepari ng students to maxi mi ze I earni ng opportuni ti es whi I e abroad and upon thd r return 

• A drri ni steri ng hi gh-qual i ty study abroad programs i n partnershi p wi th U M f acul ty and staff 
and col I eagues from other i nstiturj ons 

• I ntegrati ng study abroad with campus curricul urn, programs and activities 

• I ncreasi ng student parti ci pad on i n study abroad 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 45 



• A dvocati ng for i nternati oral educati on to enri ch U M 's i nsti tuti oral i denti ty 

Dependent on departmental approval , students may use study abroad to f ulf i 1 1 maj or, rri nor, or 
graduati on requi rements, i ncl udi ng general educati on and d ecti ves. I n addi ti on to coordi rati ng 
programs sponsored by acaderri c departments, Educati on A broad staff offers advi si ng to al I 
U ni versi ty of M aryl arid students i nterested i n studyi ng abroad. 

Study Abroad Process 

Students consi deri ng studyi ng i n another country for a semester, year, summer or wi nter are 
encouraged to vi sit Educati on A broad and revi ew the website approxi matdy one year before they 
plan to study abroad. 

The off i ce's resource I i brary provi des i nf ormati on on programs offered by M aryl and as wd I as by 
other universities and other providers. Education Abroad staff informs students of the necessary 
steps i n obtai ni ng academi c credi t and appl y i ng f i nanci al ai d to thd r program of choi ce 

Types of Study Abroad Programs 

Programs sponsored by Maryland s academe departments 

Students may reed ve resi dent credi t at M aryl and for programs sponsored by U M academi c 
departments and adrri ni stered by Educati on A broad. These i ncl ude semester programs i n London, 
Nice, Alcal§, Berlin, Bared ona, Rome, Shanghai, Bdjing, and Haifa and short term courses taught 
by M aryl and faculty duri ng the Summer, Spri ng and Wi nter terms. A ppl i cati on i nf ormati on i s 
avai I abl e from the Educati on A broad website 

Program* with institutional or organizational arrangements with Maryland 

M aryl and Exchange Programs: Exchange students are di recti y enrol I ed as f ul I -ti me students at one 
of a number of presti gi ous ford gn uni versi ti es around the worl d wi th whi ch the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and has agreements. I n turn, students from the partner uni versi ti es abroad enrol I at M aryl and 
for a semester or year. Exchanges are often rd ated to academi c departments, and requi re extensi ve 
I anguage or academi c background and at I east a 3. grade poi nt average. M any offer tui ti on 
waivers. There are specific exchange programs for students majori ng i n Chemistry, J ournal ism 
Communication, and M athematics, among other f idds of study. 

The University of Maryland also has agreements in pi ace for its students to study abroad through the 
f ol I owi ng i nsti tuti ons or organi zati ons: M acquari e U ni versi ty (A ustral i a) , the U ni versi ty of L d den 
(the Netherlands), StudyA ustral i a/The Education Abroad Network, the Danish I nstitutefor Study 
Abroad (DIS), ACTR Russia, and the University Studies Abroad Consortium (USAC). 

Programs recognized by Maryland but without any drect sponsorship or arrangement 

M aryl and students who wi sh to study abroad through other i nsti tuti ons must meet with a Study 
Abroad Advisor before applyi ng to the study abroad program Detai Is on the process for applyi ng 
and transferring credit are avai I able from the "How to Get Started" section of 
www.umd.edu/studyabroad . 

Officeof Extended Studies 

0132 M ai n Adrri ni strati on B ui I di ng 

301-405-7762 

301-314-9572 

Chuck Wilson, Assistant Vice President for Records, Registration, and Extended Studies 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 46 



oes@uird.edu 
oes.unxl.edu 

The Office of Extended Studies administers the University's Summer Term Winter Term Freshmen 

Connection, and Professional Programs. 

Summer Term serves more than 13,000 students that i ncl ude current students, vi siti ng students 

from other universities and colleges, graduates, professionals, and high school students. Summer 

Term features more than 1,700 courses that are offered morni ng, afternoon, eveni ng, and onl i ne 

duri ng three- week or six- week sessions. 

Winter Term serves more than 5,000 students that i ncl ude current students, vi siti ng students from 

other uni versi ti es and col I eges, graduates and prof essi onal s. Offered i n J anuary between the end of 

the f al I semester and the begi nni ng of the spri ng semester, Wi nter Term i s a three- week sessi on that 

features more than 450 courses that meet morni ng, afternoon, eveni ng, and onl i ne. 

Freshmen Connection offers spri ng-admitted students the opportunity to begi n thei r U ni versity of 

M aryland education i n thefal I semester. With Freshmen Connection, spri ng-admitted students earn 

up to 17 U ni versity credits toward thei r undergraduate degree and get on track to graduate i n four 

years. 

PreCdlege Programs 

The Young Scholars Program, a three-week summer program i nvites ri si ng hi gh school 

sophomores, j uniors, and seniors to pursue academic i nterests, discover career opportunities, earn 

university credits, and explore university life. Highly qualified students enroll in a three-credit 

i introductory course f eaturi ng f i d d tri ps and guest speakers. Students parti ci pate i n workshops and 

semi nars that further enri ch thei r uni versi ty experi ence and resi de on campus or commute from 

home. 

Young Scholars Discovery, a two- week summer program i nvites mi ddl e school students to expl ore 

educati on and career opportuni ti es and I earn about uni versi ty I i f e. A caderri cal I y promi si ng students 

enrol I i n non-credi t courses, attend f i el d tri ps, and engage wi th experts i n i nnovati ve f i d ds. Students 

col I aborate i n i nteracti ve semi nars, enj oy eveni ng soci al acti vi ti es, and resi de on campus or 

commute from home. 

TheFreshmen First Program prepares incoming fi rst-year students for living and learning at the 

University of Maryland. The program eases the transit] on to the university environment. Inthis 

three- week summer program students enrol Una three-credit course, attend semi nars, workshops, 

and soci al acti vi ti es, meet and study wi th other i ncorni ng freshmen, and resi de on campus or 

commute from home. 

Professional Programs include Professional M asters programs, Graduate Certificate programs, 

post- baccal aureate opportuni ti es, and custorri zed i ni ti ati ves that i ncl ude semi nars, work force 

trai ni ng, and short courses crafted for i ndustry appl i cati on. All programs are desi gned to meet the 

educational needs of professional audiences and target external constituencies i n busi ness, 

government, and non-profit organizations. These programs serve professional audiences i n new 

ways, i mprovi ng access for prof essi onal audi ences through i nnovati ve approaches to teachi ng and 

I earni ng, parti cul arl y through the onl i ne envi ronment. 



Honor 

www. uni on. umd.edu/studentorg/ 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 47 



Students who excd i n schol arshi p and I eadershi p may be i nvited to j oi n the appropri ate honor 

society. Honor societies at Maryland include 

Alpha Chi Sigma (Chemistry) 

*AlphaEpsi I on (Agricultural Engineering) 

*Alpha Epsilon Delta (Pre-Med) 

Alpha Epsilon Rho (BroadcastJ ournalism) 

*Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 

*Alpha Lambda Delta (Freshman Scholarship) 

A I pha Phi Si gma (Cri rri nal J usti ce) 

A I pha Zeta (Agri culture) 

B eta A I pha Psi (A ccounti ng) 

Beta Gamma Sigma (Busi ness M anagement) 

Black Honors Caucus 

*Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 

Delta N u A I pha (Transportati on) 

Delta Phi Alpha (German) 

Delta Sigma Pi (Business) 

Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

*Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

*Gamma Theta U psi I on (Geography) 

*Golden Key Honor Society (Leadership/Scholarship) 

*Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

* K appa Tau A I pha (J ournal i sm) 
*Lambda Pi Eta (Speech Communication) 

* Mortar Board National Honor Society (Scholarship) 
* N ati onal Soci ety of Col I egi ate Schol ars 
*OmegaChi Epsilon (Chemistry Engineering) 
*Omega Rho (Business) 

*Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

*Orricron Delta Kappa (Scholarship/Leadership) 

*Order of Omega (Fraternity/Sorority Leadership) 

Phi Alpha Epsilon (Health/Human Resources) 

*Phi A I pha Theta (History) 

Phi Beta Kappa (Scholarship) 

Phi Chi Theta (Business and Economics) 

*Phi Eta Sigma (Freshman Scholarship) 

*Phi Kappa Phi (Senior/Graduate Scholarship) 

*Phi Sigma (Biology) 

*Phi Sigma Pi (Scholarship/Leadership) 

*Phi Sigma lota (French/Italian) 

*Pi Si gma A I pha (Political Science) 

*Phi SigmaTheta 

Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) 

*Primannum Honor Society 

*Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Si gma A I pha Omi cron ( M i crobi ol ogy) 

Sigma Delta Chi (Journalism) 

*Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 

*SigmaTau Delta (English) 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Page 48 



*TauBetaPi (Engineering) 
Tau Beta Sigma 

* M ember of A ssoci ati on of Col I ege H onor Soci eti es 
I ntercd lecpate Athletics 

Comcast Center 

301-314-7075 

301-314-7149 

D i rector of Athl eti cs: K evi n A nderson 

dorourke@umd.edu 

www.urrterps.com 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate A thl eti cs i s responsi bl e for di recti ng i ntercol I egi ate athl eti c 
programs for both women and men, and for managi ng the campus 1 athl eti c compl ex. 

Women's i ntercol I egi ate athl eti c teams i ncl ude cross country, fidd hockey, soccer and vol I eybal I i n 
the f al I ; basketbal I , acrobati cs and tumbl i ng, swi mmi ng, i ndoor track/f i d d and gymnasti cs duri ng the 
wi nter; and I acrosse, softbal I , outdoor track/f i d d and water pol o i n the spri ng. Tenni s and golf 
competiti on i s schedul ed i n both the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

There are men's teams i n f ootbal I , soccer and cross country i n the f al I ; basketbal I , swi mmi ng, 
wresti i ng, and i ndoor track/f i d d duri ng the wi nter; and basebal I , I acrosse and outdoor track/f i d d i n 
the spri ng. Tenni s and golf competiti on i s schedul ed i n both the f al I and spri ng seasons. 

M en's and women's i ntercol I egi ate athl eti c teams compete i n the N ati onal Col I egi ate Athl eti c 
Association (NCAA) at the Division I levd and intheAtiantic Coast Conference (ACC). 

Eligibility Requirements 

Student-athletes must meet all NCAA, ACC and University of Maryland requirements for 
eligibility. The chart bd ow serves only as a gui dd ine to digibi I ity rules and does not provide 
complete detail. All NCAA requirementsareavailablevia www.NCAA.org . 

NCAA Continuing Eligibility and Progress Towards Degree Guidelines 



Year of Initial 
Collegiate Enrollment 


_ 




Semester of Full-Time 
Enrollment 


NCAA Requirements 




Enteri ng 1st semester 
(1st year) 


Must be certified by the NCAA Eligibility 
Center 


1* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
E nteri ng 2nd semester semester 

|*1.29UMGPA 


Enteri ng 3rd semester 
(2nd year) 


* 18 hours earned duri ng previous regular 
acaderri c year and 24 for the year 
*6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned i n 
previ ous semester 
*1.8NCAAGPA 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Page 49 



Fall 2003 -present 


E rteri ng 4th semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credi ts previ ous 
semester 

* 1.80 NCAA GPA 


E rteri ng 5th semester 
(3rd year) 


* 40% (*48 degree appl i cabl e credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours during previous regular academic 
year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 

* declaration of degree program 


E rteri ng 6th semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 1.90 NCAA GPA 


E rteri ng 7th semester 
(4th year) 


* 60% (*72 degree applicable credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours earned during previous regular 
academic year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


Erteri ng 8th semester 


* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned i n 
previ ous semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 


Erteri ng 9th semester 
(5th year) 


* 80% (*96 degree appl i cabl e credits) of 
degree requi rement compl eted 

* 18 hours earned in previous regular 
academic year 

* 6 degree appl i cabl e credits earned previ ous 
semester 

* 2.00 NCAA GPA 



*Based on 120 credit degree program 

1. Studert-athl etes are al I owed 4 seasons of eligibility within 5 cal endar years from the ti me they 
f i rst enrol I f ul l-ti me i n a col legiate i institution When they parti ci pate i n any competition intheir 
sport (i ncl udi ng a scri mmage with outsi de competiti on), whether it i s f or one mi nute or an enti re 
contest, they have used a season of competiti on and one of thei r four years of eligibility. 

2. Studert-athl etes must be enrol I ed f ul I -ti me, that i s, carry a rri ni mum of 12 credi t hours each 
semester to be d i gi bl e to practi ce or compete wi th thei r team I f a studert-athl ete drops bd ow 12 
hours he/she wi 1 1 i mmediatdy be i nd igi bleto practice or compete, and his/her athletics grart-i n-aid 
wi 1 1 be revoked unl ess otherwi se approved by the Department of Athl eti cs. G raduati ng seni ors who 
need I ess than 12 credi t hours to compl ete degree requi rements may reed ve an excepti on to enrol I i n 
less than 12 credit hours by compl eti ng a Less Than 12 form available in the ASCDU. 

3. Studert-athl etes are requi red to meet multi pi e sets of acaderri c standards i n order to mai ntai n 
eligibility for athletic competition. These standards are dictated by the NCAA and the Athletic 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 50 



Counci I . I n additi on, student-athl etes may be requi red to mai ntai n standards di dated by the col I ege 
of the; r maj or for either adrri ssi on i nto a degree program, or mai ntai ni ng enrol I mart. 

4. Transfer student-athl etes must meet all NCAA, ACC and UMD requirements in order to be 
immediately eligible. PI ease note that in certain cases NCAA and ACC eligibility requirements are 
more stri ngent than UMD adrri ssi ons requi rements. 

5. Ineligible student-athl etes are not permitted to compete or travel . 

6. First semester freshman who do not meet the cumul ati ve G PA requi rements, may seek an appeal 
under certai n ci rcumstances. Transfer student-athl etes are requi red to attai n the appropri ate 
cumulative GPA based upon the number of f ul l-ti me semesters they have been enrol led i n any 
institution. 

7. Di srri ssed and I ater rei nstated student-athl etes are i nd i gi bl e for competiti on unti I they meet 
desi gnated grade poi nt averages. 

The Department of I ntercol I egi ate Athl eti cs ( I CA ) al so sponsors a number of awards for 

achi evement i n athl eti cs and/or schol arshi p. For further i nf ormati on, contact the Academi c Support 

and Career Development unit (ASCDU), 301-314-7043. 



Officeof I nternational Services 

2111 Hoi zapf el Hall 

301-314-7740 

301-314-3280 

Di rector Susan Dougherty 

i nternati onal servi ces@umd.edu 

http://www. i nternati onal . umd. edu/i es/ 

I nternati onal students and f acul ty recei ve a wi de vari ety of servi ces desi gned to he! p them benef i t 
from their experience in the United States. The Office of International Services (OIS) works closely 
with the Office of Undergraduate Adrri ssi ons to process F-l and J -1 visa documents for admitted 
students. 01 S sponsors ori entati on programs, i mm grati on and empl oyment semi nars and coffee 
hour. I n addition, 01 S advisors counsel i nternational students concerni ng i mm grati on and personal 
issues. 

F-landJ -1 status students. Students with F-l or J -1 status are responsible for following the 
regulations of the U.S. CitizenshipaixMnYri grati on Servi ce(U SCI S) and the Department of State 
( DOS) pertai ni ng to thei r vi sa status. The regul ati ons affect extensi on of stay, transfers, off-campus 
empl oyment authori zati on, practi cal trai ni ng, and course I oads. The Off i ce of I nternati onal Servi ces 
i s the onl y off i ce on campus authori zed to si gn i mrri grati on documents. 
Maintaining Status 

• Full-time registration: I n order to mai ntai n f ul I -ti me student status for i mrri grati on purposes, 
F-l and J -1 undergraduate students are expected to register for and complete a rri ni mum credit 
load of 12 hours per semester. Pre-approval from 01 S is requi red if you are goi ng to complete 
the semester with fewer than 12 credits. 

• Documents I nternati onal students must have a val i d passport at al I ti mes unl ess exempt from 
passport requirements. If your 1-20 or DS-2109 will soon expire you should apply for an 
extensi on at I east 30 days pri or to the program compl eti on date on the document. To travel 
outside the U.S. and re-enter as an F-l or J -1, an advisor in OIS must sign your 1-20 or 
DS-2109 before you leave. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces P 3 ^ 51 



• Health I insurance A 1 1 undergraduate students, regardl ess of vi sa status, are requi red by the 
U ni versi ty H eal th Center to carry adequate heal th i nsurance. I n additi on, J - 1 students must 
present copies of their health insurance to 01 S in order to comply with Department of State 
requirements. 

Letters and Sciences 

1117 H ornbake L i brary 
301-314-8418 
301-314-9394 

Assistant Dean/Director: Deborah Reid Bryant, Ph. D. 
askltsc@umd.edu 
www.ltsc.umd.edu 

General Advising: 301-314-8418 

Pre- Law Advising: www.prdaw.umd.edu 

Credit-by-Exam 301-314-8418 

L etters and Sci ences i s the acaderri c home for students expl ori ng a vari ety of f i d ds before sd ecrj ng 
a major, for post- baccalaureate students taki ng additional course work, and for non-degree seeki ng 
students taki ng undergraduate courses. Letters and Sci ences may al so serve as the acaderri c home 
for students compl eti ng requi rements for entry i nto a L i rri ted E nrol I ment Program. 

For more i nf ormati on, see Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Maryland En^ish Institute (ME I) 

1117 Col e Student A cti vi ti es B ui I di ng 
301-405-8634 
301-314-9462 

Director: Dr. Elizabeth Driver 
md@umd.edu 
www.md.umd.edu 

The Maryland English I nstitute (M El ) provides English language instruction and assessment at the 
postsecondary I evd for speakers of other I anguages who wi sh to I earn E ngl i sh for acaderri c, 
prof essi onal , or personal reasons. MEI fulfills itsrrission by provi di ng: 

• courses for matriculated students 

• courses for i nternati onal teachi ng assi stants 

• afull-time, multi-levd Intensive English Program 

• short courses for members of the campus and local community 

• custom-designed programs for special groups 

• eval uati on of the E ngl i sh I anguage prof i ci ency of prospecti ve and provi si onal I y adrri tted 
students 

• assessment of oral communi cati on ski 1 1 s of i nternati onal teachi ng assi stants 

M El offers rigorous courses of study whi le provi di ng a positive and supportive learni ng community 

and promoting intercultural understanding. 

Two regul ar i nstructi onal programs are offered for provi si onal I y adrri tted and prospecti ve 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 52 



undergraduate students who are non- native speakers of English: a serri-i ntensi ve program for 
provi si onal I y adrri tted students and afull-timei ntensi ve program for prospecti ve students. 

Senri-I ntensive(UMEI 005): This program is open only to students admitted to the University of 
M aryl and. Students who are provi si onal I y adrri tted to the U ni versi ty sati sf actori I y compl ete U M E I 
005 their fi rst semester in order to become fully adrri tted, full -time students at the University. 
U M E I 005 cl asses meet f i ve days a week, two hours a day. The program i s desi gned especi al I y to 
perfect the language ski I Is necessary for academic work at the University of Maryland. No credit is 
given toward any university degree. 

I ntensive; Thisfull-ti me Engl ish language program is open to non-native speakers who wish to 
i mprove their English for acaderri c, prof essi onal or personal reasons. There are three i ntensi ve 
English sessi ons per year: one for f al I semester, one for spri ng, and a seven- week sessi on i n the 
summer. Each consists of approxi matdy 23 hours of i nstruction weekly. The program offers five 
I evd s of i nstructi on, begi nni ng through advanced. 

Sati sf actory compl eti on of the program does not guarantee acceptance at the U ni versi ty . E nrol I ment 
is by M El application and acceptance, and no credit is given toward any university degree. Tuition 
rerri ssi on cannot be appl i ed to M E I courses. 



Officeof Multi-ethnic Student Education (OMSE) 

1101 H ornbake L i brary 
301-405-5615 or 405-5616 
www.umd.edu/OM SE 

The Offi ce of M ulti -ethni c Student Educati on at U M D provi des servi ces marketed toward over 
8,200 multi -ethni c students. M any of the students served by OM SE are achi evi ng at hi gh rates of 
personal and prof essi onal excel I ence. N everthd ess, there are others who are experi end ng acaderri c 
and personal chal I enges as outi i ned i n the Offi ce of I nstituti onal Research PI anni ng and Assessment, 
U M CP data on undergraduate retenti on and graduati on rates. OM SE provi des programs and 
resources that support the acaderri c, personal , and prof essi onal excel I ence of students. The rri ssi on 
of the Office of M ulti-ethnic Student Education is di rectly I i nked to the d i rri nation of the 
achievement gap at the University of Maryland. With that goal inrrind, OMSE provi des direct and 
i ndi rect servi ces through programs such as a wal k-i n tutori al program study I ab, computer I ab with 
disability services software, weekly honors program mentoring program, Check Ups, Academic 
Excd I ence Soci ety, Col I ege Success Schol ars, Road M ap to Success, the annual A meri can I ndi an 
Powwow and a myri ad of servi ces that recogni ze the mul ti pi e i denti ti es of students. 

OM SE 's servi ces emphasi ze the i mportance of "sea ng" al I students from a gl oral , i integrated 
perspective. The OM SE team is dedicated to our motto of high expectations, high standards and 
excellence. The political and historical patterns of the University of Maryland continue to frame our 
unwavering comrritment to address the climate of indifference, racial/diversity incompetence and 
rri si nf ormed perspecti ves that conti nue to permeate the everyday experi ences of mul ti -ethni c 
students. OM SE encourages al I students to i dentify empoweri ng strategi es to ensure matri cul ati on, 
retention, graduation, and excd lent academic outcomes. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 53 



Oak Ridge Associated Universities 

Patrick G. O'Shea, Vice President and Chief Research Officer 
ORAU Councilor, University of Maryland 
www.orau.org 

Since 1951, students and faculty of University of Maryland have benefited from its rrernbership in 
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of 98 colleges and universities 
ard a cortractor for Itie US Department of Energy (DOE) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU 
works with its member i nstiturj ons to hd p the; r students and faculty gai n access to federal research 
facilities throughout the country; to keep its members i nformed about opportuniti es for f d I owshi p, 
scholarshi p, and research appoi ntments; and to organize research al Nances among its members. 

Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), the DOE facility that ORAU 
operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, as wd I as faculty enjoy access to a multitude of 
opportuniti es for study and research. Students can parti ci pate i n programs coveri ng a wi de vari ety of 
di sci pi i nes i ncl udi ng busi ness, earth sci ences, epi derni ol ogy, engi neeri ng, physi cs, geol ogi cal 
sciences, pharmacology, ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, and mathematics. 
A ppoi ntment and program I ength range from one month to four years. M any of these programs are 
especial I y designed to i ncreasethe numbers of underrepresented rri nority students pursui ng degrees 
i n science and engi neeri ng rdated disci pi i nes, and detai Is on locations and benefits can be found i n 
the ORISE Catalog of Education and Training Programs, whi ch i s avai I abl e at .www.orau.gov/ori setec 
www.orau.gov/ori seYeduc. htm or by cal I i ng the contacts bdow. 

ORA U 's Off i ce of Partnershi p Devd opment seeks opportuni ti es for partnershi ps and al I i ances 
among ORUA's members, private industry, and major federal facilities. Activities include faculty 
devdopment programs, such as the Ralph E. PoweJ unior Faculty Enhancement Awards, the 
Visiting I ndustrial Scholars Program consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research and 
support programs as wd I as servi ces to chi ef research off i cers. 

For more i information about ORAU and its programs, contact: 

Patrick G. O'Shea 

V i ce Presi dent and C hi ef Research Off i cer 

ORAU Counci lor for U ni versity of M aryland 

MonnieE. Champion 
ORAU Corporate Secretary 
865-576-3306 

Visit the ORAU homepageatwww.orau.org. 

Orientation 

1102 Cole Student Activities Building 
301-314-8217 
Director: Gerry Strumpf 
www.ori entati on. umd.edu 

The goal of Orientation is to i introduce new students to the University of M aryland community. The 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 54 



Ori entati on Off i ce offers a wi de range of transit] onal programrri ng and servi ces for students and 
thei r f ami I i es as they prepare to attend the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. 

For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Pre-Cdlege Procj-ams 

1107 West Education Annex 
301-405-6776 
301-314-9155 

Executive Di rector: Georgette Hardy DeJ esus 
pre-col I ege@umd.edu 
www. precol I ege. umd.edu 

Room 3101 & 3103 Susquehanna Hal I 

www. precol I ege. umd.edu 

pre-col I ege@umd.edu 

Executive Di rector: Georgette Hardy DeJ esus 

Upward Bound Programs: 301-405-6776 

Upward Bound Math and Science Program (UBM S): 301-405-1224 

The University of Maryland Pre-College Programs in Undergraduate Studies is comprised of three 

federal I y and state supported programs: 

Two Upward Bound Programs (UB) and 

Upward Bound-Math and Science Program (UB-MS). 

These programs generate the ski 1 1 s and moti vati on necessary for success i n post-secondary 
educati on. They i mmerse hi gh school parti ci pants i n ri gorous acaderri c i nstructi on, tutori ng, 
counsel i ng, and i nnovati ve educati onal experi ences throughout the school year and duri ng the 
six- week summer residential program Pre-Col lege Programs are part of the Federal TRI O Programs 
that provide educational opportunity outreach programs designed to motivate and support students 
from disadvantaged backgrounds. 

The U B Programs are open to I ow-i ncome and/or f i rst-generati on col I ege bound hi gh school students 
i n grades 9 through 12, who demonstrate an acaderri c need and want to pursue a four-year 
postsecondary educati on. E I i gi bl e students must attend target hi gh school s i n Pri nee George's and 
M ontgomery Counti es. H i gh school pri nci pal s, teachers, and counsel ors recommend students to the 
program 

E I i gi bi I i ty f or the U pward B ound Programs requi re students attend, N orthwood H i gh School - i n 
Montgomery County and Bladensburg, Central, High Point, Parkdaleor Northwestern High Schools 
i n Pri nee George's County. 

The U B M S i s open to students i n grades 9 through 12, who demonstrate an acaderri c need and want 
to pursue post-secondary educati on programs i n f i d ds rd ated to mathemati cs and sci ence. U B M S 
recruits high school students have successfully completed Algebra I and attend Potomac and 
Fairmont Hdghts High Schools in Pri nee George's County, MD; WatkinsMill High School in 
Montgomery County, MD , Edmonston-Westside High School in Baltimore, MD and Bdl High 
School in Washington, DC. 

Office of the Regstrar 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 55 



First floor Mitchell Building 

301-314-8240 

Regi strar: Adri an Cornel i us 

www.testudo.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of the Regi strar i s committed to provi di ng the hi ghest I evd of customer sati sfacti on i n al I 
aspects of its operati on, whi ch i ncl udes coordi nati ng course enrol I mart and student regi strati on; 
mai ntai ni ng students' permanent acaderri c records; adrri ni steri ng academi c pol i cy compl i ance; and 
producti ng off i ci al transcri pts, certif i cati ore, and di pi omas. Detai I ed i nf ormati on on regi strar's off i ce 
services is published in chapter 4 of this catalog. 

Center for Teaching Excellence 

2301 Marie Mount Hall 

301-405-9356 

301-314-0385 

Director: Spencer Benson 

cte@umd.edu 

www.cte.umd.edu 

The Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence supports departmental , indivi dual and campus- wi de efforts to 
enhance teaching and learning at the University of Maryland. The Center offers assistance to 
departments, faculty, graduate and undergraduate teachi ng assi starts. The Center al so adrri ni sters an 
undergraduate teaching assistants program a University-wide teaching and learning program for 
graduate teachi ng assi starts, vari ous faculty and graduate student I earni ng communiti es, a summer 
i nstitute for faculty i interested i n enhanci ng thei r use of technol ogy for student I earni ng, vari ous 
Schol arshi p of Teachi ng and L earni ng programs and support for attendance to regi onal and nati oral 
meeti ngs focused on teachi ng and I earni ng. 



See al so the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 

Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) 

2100D (2nd Floor) McKddin Library 

301-314-6786 

F ranci s D uV i rage, D i rector 

ugresearch@umd.edu 

www.ugresearch.umd.edu 

The Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) is an initiative of the Office of the Dean 
of U ndergraduate Studi es. Created as a resource for students and faculty, the Center serves as a 
cl eari nghouse for both on-campus and off -campus research opportuniti es for undergraduates. M aj or 
programs of the M CU R i ncl ude M aryl and Student Researchers, whi ch permits faculty to list 
research opportunities open to undergraduates duri ng the academic year, and M aryl and Summer 
Scholars, which provides fundi ng for students to conduct summer research (on campus or elsewhere 
i n the U S or abroad as needed) under the mertorshi p of a M aryl and faculty member. 
For more i nformati on, see Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es secti on i n Chapter 6. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 56 



Tutoring 

2204 Marie Mount 

301-405-4745 

www.aap.uird.edu 

The I rtensi ve Educational Development Program (I ED) i n the Academic Achievement Program 
(AAP) provides tutoring servi ces for eligible University of Maryland students. The schedule for 
tutori ng, study ski 1 1 s, math support, and English support cl asses i s avai I abl e at 2204 M ari e M ount. 
Academi c support cl asses are offered for many I ower-l evd general educati on cl asses, i ncl udi ng 
math and English classes, as well as for selected entry- 1 evd classes for numerous majors (for 
example Business or Biological Sciences). For a schedule of classes as wd I asdigibilitystatusfor 
A A P's servi ces, pi ease contact the Tutori ng Coordi nator at 301-405-4745. A I so, pi ease check 
AAP's webpage at www.aap.umd.edu for schedules, job opportunities as tutors, and further 
i nf ormati on about the program 



STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

Alumni Association 

Samud Riggs IV Alumni Center 

301-405-4678 

alurmi@umd.edu 

www.al urmi .umd.edu 

800-336-8627 

The University of Maryland Alumni Association is a nonprofit, membership organization for alumni 
of the University of Maryland, College Park. By taking traditional and innovative approaches to 
al urmi programmi ng, the al urmi associ ati on f i 1 1 s many purposes, i ncl udi ng the needs of students. 

The al urmi associ ati on supports prof essi onal devd opment programs to prepare students f or I if e i n 
the " real worl d. " Students can appl y to be a part of the al urmi associ ati on's student ambassador 
organization, Carapace, which assists the alumni association with planning more than 60 programs 
per year. Students may al so appl y for schol arshi ps through the M ary I and A I urmi A ssoci ati on 
Schol arshi p Program N ew graduates reed ve a one-year compl i mentary membershi p i n the al urmi 
associ ati on that i ncl udes its f ul I range of benefits. Y ears two and three after graduati on are offered 
at a di scounted rate of $25 per year. The al urmi associ ati on al so offers graduates access to the 
onl i ne al urmi community, a free onl i ne networki ng tool al I owi ng graduates to connect with 
M aryl and al urmi and f ri ends based on shared i interests, common acquai ntances, prof essi ons, 
I ocati ons and more. U pon graduati on, the al urmi associ ati on i nvi tes new graduates to appl y to j oi n 
i ts Y oung A I urmi Comrri ttee, whi ch provi des acti vi ti es for al urmi who have graduated i n the I ast 
10 years. 

I n additi on to student programmi ng, the al urmi associ ati on honors al urmi who have di sti ngui shed 
themsd ves prof essi onal I y and personal I y through the U ni versi ty of M aryl and A I urmi A ssoci ati on 
Hal I of Fame and Annual Awards Gala. It provides special programs and services, such as consumer 
di scounts, that benefit al I al urmi . 1 1 promotes conti nui ng educati on through its cultural semi nars and 
i nternati onal travd program M ost of al I , the al urmi associ ati on seeks to bui I d the Terrapi n spi rit by 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 57 



supporti ng more than 40 al urmi cl ubs and acaderri c chapters throughout the country and the worl d. 

The al urmi associ ati on has 30 staff members, i s governed by a board of al urmi vol unteers and i s 
supported by countl ess other al urmi vol unteers around the country. 

Book Center 

Stamp Student Union, lower level 

301-314-BOOK 

www.shopterp.com 

TheUniversity Book Center operated by Barnes& Noble is the official bookstore for the University 
of Maryland. The Book Center istheonly store that carries textbooks for all of your classes. The 
store has a I arge sd ecti on of Used Digtal, and Rental Textbooks that are avai I abl e i n many 
courses. General -i nterest books, I iterature, techni cal books, and best sd I ers can be found on the 
I ower I evd of the store. The Book Center al so carri es a wi de sd ecti on of school suppl i es, and 
i mpri nted sportswear and rdated items. The Book Center website is www.shopterp.com 

The Book Center is open: 



Monday - Thursday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm 
Friday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Saturday 11: 00 am - 4: 00 pm 

Sunday 12: 00 pm - 4: 00 pm 

* Additional hours for special events. 

University Career Center and the Presidents Promise (UCC/TPP) 

3100 H ornbake L i brary, South Wi ng 

301-314-7225 

UCC-studenthd p@umd.edu 

www.Careers. umd.edu; www. Presi dentsProrri se. umd.edu 

Refer to our website at www.Careers.urrd.edu for current hours of operation and hours of career 
assistance 

Mission 

The University Career Center & The President's Promise office supports the U ni versity of 

M aryl and's mi ssi on and its acaderri c programs by provi di ng a vari ety of programs and servi ces to 

meet the di verse career devd opment and empl oyment needs of degree-seeki ng students and al urmi . 

The Center teaches, advi ses and counsd s students to make deci si ons about career i interests, 

empl oyment and f urtheri ng educati onal pursuits such as prof essi oral or graduate school . 1 1 

col I aborates wi th acaderri c departments, empl overs and al urmi i n the dd i very of workshops, 

servi ces and career/i nternshi p f ai rs. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 58 



Ti me and agai n employers state that the competitive candidate wi 1 1 have outside the classroom 
experi ences that compl ement the academi c curri cul um Through the Presi dent's Prorri se, each 
student has the chance to engage i n a sped al experi ence and offers the opportunity for extraordi nary 
personal growth. Some students achieve this growth through hands-on research, study abroad, or 
internships in the public and private sectors. Others take on leadership roles or find fulfillment in 
community servi ce programs. Presi dents Prorri se staff i s avai I abl e to hd p students navi gate through 
al I opti ons to sd ect the best opportuniti es. I n additi on, dedi cated faculty and staff are al so avai I abl e 
to hd p students chart a course to enhance thd r academi c experi ence. 

Resources Include 
Career Assistance 

Center staff can hd p students: 

• address educational and career decisions 

• identify useful resources 

• take advantage of i nternshi ps, f ul I -ti me, part-ti me and summer empl oyment opportuni ti es 

• sharpen j ob search ski 1 1 s and strategi es 

• pi an for graduate and professional school 

• i mprove resume and cover I etters 

Career Courses 

EDCP108J : J ob Search Strategies 

Thi s 1 credit course for students with j uni or or seni or standi ng teaches you strategi es for I andi ng 

i nternshi ps or f ul I -ti me empl oyment and bd ng successful i n your career. 

U N I V 099: 1 nternshi p Semi nar 

Thi s credit serri nar for graduate or undergraduate students i s desi gned to connect cl assroom theory 

to your i nternshi p and notates your i nternshi p experi ence. 

Career s4Terps 

For free access to a variety of career tools and opportunities i ncl udi ng a comprehensive I isti ng of 

employment opportunities, we recommend every student register for Careers4Terps on the Center's 

website. Once regi stered, you can parti ci pate i n on-campus i ntervi ews, make your resume vi si bl e to 

employers and learn about upcomi ng events and career news through our weekly e-newsletter. 

Y ou wi 1 1 al so gai n access to excl usi ve web resources i ncl udi ng: 

• Focus2 - A n onl i ne system that combi nes sdf -assessment, career expl orati on and 
deci si on-maki ng i nto one program 

• Where D i d U M G raduates Go? - F i nd out where f d I ow Terps have found success. 

• Career I nsider - Research employers and career i information. Download Career I nsider "books" 
on different i ndustri es. 

• Goi ng G I obal - A n i nternati onal career and empl oyment resource that gi ves you access to 
country career guides, work permit i information and cultural i ntervi ewi ng advice 

• Resume B ui I der - Thi s easy to use web-based tool hd ps you build a better resume and write 
cover I etters by hi ghl i ghrj ng ski 1 1 s and qual if i cati ons sought by empl overs. 

• Virtual M ock I ntervi ews - Practice i ntervi ewi ng by digital ly recordi ng yoursdf and then 
revi ewi ng it from your onl i ne account. 

Career & Employment Resource Room 

Thi s col I ecti on of resources hd ps students I earn about co-curri cul ar opportuniti es and career 

pi anni ng/j ob search strategi es. M ost of the books i n the Resource Room are avai I abl e for ci rcul ati on 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 59 



to U M students for one week. Topi c areas i ncl ude 

• self -assessment/career exploration 

• i nternshi p resources 

• The Presi dent's Prorri se opportuniti es 

• job search tools 

• i nf ormati on on empl oyers 

• international resources 

• graduate/professional schools 

Terp Career & J ob Search Guide 

Thi s i s a free bookl et for career pi anni ng and conducti ng a j ob search. Contents i ncl ude resume 

writing guides, successful interviewing techniques and job search tips. A vail able at the University 

Career Center & The President's Promise Office. 

The President s Premise 

The Presi dent's Prorri se gi ves undergraduate students an i ntegrated I earni ng experi ence that goes far 

beyond the cl assroom Students may f i nd opportuni ti es i n programs such as I i vi ng and I earni ng 

programs, research experiences, public and private sector internships, learning communities, 

i nternati onal experi ences, servi ce- 1 earni ng experi ences, and opportuni ti es f or I eadershi p. 

University Career Center Events 

Programs connecti ng students with al urmi and empl oyers are hel d throughout the academi c year. 

Presentati ons and events i ncl ude 

• i nternshi p strategi es 

• resume and cover I etter writi ng 

• career expos and f ai rs 

• networking opportunities 

• career and empl oy mart panel s 

• empl oyer i nf ormati on and networki ng sessi ons 

• webinars 

For a f ul 1 1 isti ng, go to www.Careers.umd.edu 
Web Resources 

www.Careers.umd.edu 

Read arti cl es about career pi anni ng, j ob hunti ng and empl oyrrent trends; keep up-to-date about new 

programs, servi ces and events; use our Career L i nks to access other j ob and career sites. 

www.PresidentsPromise.umd.edu 

N avi gate the opportuni ti es avai I abl e at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and that compl ement student 

academi c pursuits and bri ng cl assroom knowl edge to I if e. 

University Counseling Center 

Shoemaker Bui I ding 
301-314-7651 
301-314-9206 (fax) 
www.counsd i ng. umd.edu 

Seeki ng hd p i s a si gn of strength! M any students encounter a vari ety of personal , soci al , career, and 
academi c i ssues that cal I for assi stance beyond advi ce provi ded by f ri ends and f ami I y . Fortunate! y, 
the University Counseling Center provides free and confidential counseling servi ces to all University 
of M aryl and students. To schedul e an appoi ntment cal I 301-314-7651 or stop by the front desk i n 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 60 



the mai n I obby of the Shoemaker B ui I di ng. Wal k-i n counsel ing is avai I abl e to students of col or who 
woul d I i ke a consul tati on wi th a counsel or of col or, and G L BTQ students who woul d I i ke a 
consul tati on wi th a gay, I esbi an or a gay al I y counsel or, dai I y from 3: 00 p. m to 4: 00 p. m. Students 
who seek hd p i n choosi ng a maj or can wal k-i n for consultati on with a career counsel or on 
Thursdays from 12:30 p.m to 2:30 p.m Our newest wal k-i n service is for students who are 
veterans. Veterans Wal k-l n Hour occurs on Wednesdays (at Vet Center) and Thursdays (at 
Counseling Center) from 3:00 p.m to 4:00 p.m, and Fridays at 10am at the Vet Center. 

Counseling Center Services 

Personal/Social Counseling. You don't have to deal with your problems alone. Inawarmand 
supportive envi ronment, you can meet with a counselor to discuss any concern you may have related 
to your personal and soci al wd I -bei ng. A mong the topi cs many students di scuss i n counsd i ng are 
sdf -esteem stress, anxiety, depression, rdationship issues, sex, family problems, and londiness. 
Y ou may see a counsd or for i ndi vi dual counsd i ng, coupl es counsd i ng, or j oi n one of the many 
counsd or-led support groups. Cal I 301-314-7651 or visit our website - 
www.counsd i rg.umd.edu/Structur/cslgservice.htm 

Career Counseling. A normal part of your devd opment i n col I ege i s i dentifyi ng who you are i n 
rd ati on to a future career. Y ou can get hd p wi th thi s process i n i ndi vi dual career counsel i ng at the 
U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center. Y our expl orati on may i ncl ude taki ng career i nterest tests and 
i nterpreti ng the results with a counsd or or taki ng advantage of a computerized career i information 
system Whether you are choosi ng a maj or, establ i shi ng career goal s, or consi deri ng j ob 
opportunities, it is important to understand how your personality, values, and interests rdateto your 
future prof essi onal I if e. Career counsd i ng at the Counsd i ng Center i s a good pi ace to begi n. The 
M ajors Wal k-i n program is avai lable on Thursdays from 12:30-2:30 p.m Cal I 301-314-7651 or visit 
our websi te - www. counsd i ng. umd.edu/Servi ces/srv_car. htm 

Academic Skills Counseling. M any students woul d I i ke to i improve thd r acaderri c ski 1 1 s. I f you 
want to enhance your I earni ng strategi es, overcome weak areas, or thi nk di ff erentl y about bd ng an 
effective col lege learner, schedule an appoi ntment with one of the University Counsd i ng Center's 
academic skills specialists in the Learning Assistance Service (LAS). The counsd ors in LAS can 
hd p you enhance your writi ng, math, note-taki ng, test-taki ng, ti me management and I earni ng 
strategies. I n addition to worki ng i ndi vidual ly with students, the LAS staff offer a variety of 
one-credi 1 1 earni ng strategi es courses, as wd I as academi c ski 1 1 s workshops. Topi cs covered i n L A S 
workshops i ncl ude academi c success strategi es, exam ski 1 1 s, ti me management, and end-of -semester 
survi val strategi es. L A S offers an E ngl i sh Conversati on program for i nternati onal students and a 
di ssertati on support group for doctoral students. To schedul e an appoi ntment phone 301-314-7693 
or sign up online at: https://lasonline.umd.edu. Visit our website- www.counsding.umd.edu/LAS. 
Workshops and Group Counseling. Y ou can gai n strength to deal with your concerns by getti ng 
together with other peopl e who share si rri I ar probl ems, i nterests, and goal s. Each semester, the 
U ni versi ty Counsd i ng Center offers weekl y support groups addressi ng a vari ety of topi cs, such as 
career exploration, dissertation support, procrastination prevention, and stress management. Recent 
group offerings have included, "Circle of Sisters," a support group for black women; "My Body-My 
Sdf: A Woman's Group," which addresses problems of body image and eating; and a Social 
A nxi ety group that assi sts peopl e with strategi es for overcorri ng shyness and anxi ety when deal i ng 
with others. Cal I 301-314-7651 or vi sit our website - 
www.counsd i rg.umd.edu/Services/srv_grp.htm. 

Disability Services The University Counsd i ng Center's Disabi I ity Support Service provides a range 
of accommodati ons for students with di sabi lities, including i nterpreters and transcri bi ng servi ces for 
deaf or hard-of-heari ng students; enlarged pri nt and dectronic format of textbooks and written 
materials for individuals with print material disabilities (eg., blind or low vision, learning 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Page 61 



di sabi lities and attend ondeficitdi sorders, or physi cal di sabi lities); extended ti me and pri vate space 
for exams; and assi stance with access to vari ous bui I di ngs and f aci I iti es on campus as wd I as access 
to the campus 1 paratransit servi ce. I f you are a new or returni ng student, contact the Di sabi I ity 
Support Servi ce i n the Counsd i ng Center as soon as possi bl e at 301-314-7682 - (voi ce and TTY ), or 
email usatdissup@umd.edu, or visit our website- www.counsding.umd.edu/DSS. 

Returning Students Program. I f you are over 25 and returni ng to school after a break i n your 
formal education, you probably have different needs than the traditional col lege student. The 
Returni ng Students Program i n the U ni versity Counsd i ng Center's Learni ng Assistance Service 
(LAS) is designed to hd p you with the transition to academic I ife. To make your adj ustment to the 
uni versi ty successful , workshops, counsd i ng, and i nf ormati on are avai I abl e at the Counsd i ng 
Center. Cal I 301-314-7693 or visit our website - www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/LAS. 
Testing Services. TheTesti ng, Research and Data Processi ng U nit, i n the U ni versity Counsd i ng 
Center admi ni sters tests for counsd i ng purposes, such as career i nterest i nventori es, and al so 
administers national standardized tests, such as the GRE, LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and Miller 
A nal ogi es. Cal I 301-314-7688 or vi sit our website - www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/Structur/str_trdp. htm 
Research Services. G roup and i ndi vi dual consul tati on are avai I abl e for those who need assi stance 
wi th research desi gn, stati sti cs and wri ti ng proj ect proposal s, theses, and di ssertati ons. Cal I 
301-314-7660 or vi sit our website - www.counsd i ng. umd.edu/Structur/trdpurschgrp. htm 

Support for Parents of College Students The Parent Warm 1 i ne is a confidential tdephone and 
emai I servi ce for any parent concerned about hi s or her student's adj ustment at col I ege, i ncl udi ng 
concerns impacting academic, social, and emotional realms, and overall mental health. Parent 
Warm 1 i ne staff can be contacted at 301-314-7651 or parentwarml i ne@umd.edu. 
University Counseling Center Hours 



Counseling Service appoi nbrEnts (all students) 



301-314-7651 



Monday-Thursday 
Friday 



8:30 am to 9:00 pm 
8:30 am to 4:30 pm 



Students of Color Walk-In Hours 
Monday- Friday 



no appoi ntment needed 
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm 



Rainbow Walk- In Hours 
Tuesday- Friday 



no appoi ntment needed 
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm 



Veterans Walk-in Hours 
Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays 



no appoi ntment needed 

W 3-4 pm Th 3-4pm F 10-11 am 



Majors Walk-in Hours 
Wednesdays 



no appoi ntment needed 
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 62 



Learning Assistance Service 301-314-7693 

M ondays 8: 30 am to 7: 00 pm 

Tuesday - F ri day 8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



Disability Support Servi ces 301-314-7682 

M onday - F ri day 8: 30 am to 4: 30 pm 



Testing, Research and Data Processing Unit 301-314-7688 

Monday - Friday Q S __. „ on nm 

w ■ ■■ . , £ . .. 8:30 am to 4:30 pm 

V an abl e eveni ng hours for tesb ng purposes ^ 



Dining Services 

1109 South Campus Di ni ng Hal I 
Dining Plans: 301-314-8069 
Terrapin Express: 301-314-8068 
Student Employment: 301-314-8058 
umfood@umd.edu 
dining.umd.edu 

The University of M aryland offers one of the ten largest self-operated and self -supported di ni ng 
servi ces programs i n the country. Two a I a carte dining halls are open from 7: 30 a. m unrj I mi dni ght 
on most weekdays and duri ng the day on weekends. A n al I -you-care-to-eat di ni ng hal I serves di nner 
M onday through F ri day. Caf ® and Conveni ence Shops tucked i n acaderri c buildi ngs and cl ose to 
resi dence hal I s have hours of operati on that meet the needs of those faci I iti es. 

The two a I a carte di ni ng hal I s feature a total of 21 cul i nary stati ons servi ng bui I d-your-own pasta, 
stuffed-to-order burritos, custom-made hot and cold del i sandwiches and wraps, self -serve and 
sped al I y-assembl ed sal ads, rati sseri e chi cken wi th heal thy homemade si de di shes, and cl assi c 
I unches and di nners. Students wi 1 1 f i nd i nternati onal I y therned shops, bakeri es and i ce cream shops, 
a vegan stati on, and M ongol i an gri 1 1 s. 

The newest addition to the di ni ng program is 251 North - a completdy remodded, redesigned and 
re-i magi ned di ni ng hal 1 . 251 North serves al I -you-care-to-eat di ni ng that encourages you to 
experi mart with new food and bri ngs you your favorite dishes. 251 North features f i vethemed 
eateri es set i n a wd corn ng di ni ng room with smal I tabl es, cocktai I tabl es, banquettes, and counter 
seati ng. 251 N orth i s a cul i nary and soci al center for the campus, provi di ng a dd i ci ous di ni ng 
experi ence and enhanci ng the I if e of the community. 

Two restaurants, fourteen caf ® and six convenience shops are scattered across campus. For a 
compl ete I i st of di ni ng I ocati ons, hours, and general i nf ormati on vi si t di ni ng. umd.edu. We wd come 
students, faculty, staff and visitors i nto al I of our locations across campus. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces P 3 ^ 63 



Resident Dining Plans 

Resi dent di ni ng pi ans contai n three sub-accounts: 251 N orth M eal s, Resi dent Poi nts, and Terp 
Bucks. 

Each 251 North M eal al lows you one-ti me access to this al l-you-care-to-eat faci I ity. Di ni ng Plans for 
students on the north si de of campus i ncl ude one M eal per week. Di ni ng PI ans for students on the 
south si de of campus i ncl ude four M eal s per semester. The number of Poi nts i s adj usted to provi de 
equi val ent di ni ng for al I resi dent di ni ng pi ans. I nsi de 251 N orth, you will find vari ed menus, f ami I i ar 
dishes, and exotic new foods created by our chefs usi ng fresh i ngredients and healthful cooki ng 
methods. 

Resident Poi nts are used i n two a la carte di ni ng hal Is, and Terp Bucks add the option of di ni ng i n 
most of the cafes and conveni ence shops on campus. There are enough Poi nts arid B ucks i ncl uded i n 
the di ni ng plan to purchase approxi matdy 12 complete meal packages (eal led Val ue M eals) every 
week. These di ni ng hal I s are open breakfast, I unch, di nner, and I ate ni ght. E nj oy a I i ght snack, a 
quick meal to go, a f ul I di nner, or bri ng guests for a feast - its al I up to you! Asa bonus, A dele's 
Restaurant i n the Stamp accepts Poi nts for di nner M onday through Thursday. 

Access M eal s, Poi nts, and B ucks usi ng your U M I D card. Y our pi dure i s on the front and you must 
be present every ti me the card i s used. Check recent transacti ons and bal ances onl i ne 24/7 or ask for 
a recei pt showi ng your bal ance after any transacti on. 

Our goal i s to provi de popul ar and nutriti ous food i n a wd corn ng setti ng every day. We are 
confident that you wi 1 1 be i mpressed by the qual ity and sdection avai lable i n di ni ng locations across 
campus. 

The Add-On Dining Plan 

Resi dents students can expand thd r on-campus di ni ng opti ons with an Add-On Di ni ng PI an. Thi s 
plan is accepted at every di ni ng location on campus i ncl udi ng quick service locations i n the Stamp 
that do not accept Poi nts or B ucks. For detai I s go to di ni ng. umd.edu/ 

The Apartment Dining Plan 

Apartment Plan offers three benefits to students not I i vi ng i n traditional on-campus housi ng, 1) The 
ability to purchase food on campus without carryi ng cash or a credit card. 2) The conveni ence of 
payi ng through the B ursar's Off i ce usi ng f i nanci al ai d, schol arshi p money or the Terp Payment PI an. 
3) The security that if the U M ID card i s I ost, the account can be frozen and then attached to a 
repl acement U M I D card. A partment PI an poi nts rol I over from f al I to spri ng semester. For detai I s 
see our web site. 
Terrapin Express 

Terrapi n Express i s an opti onal pre-pai d debit account you can attach to your U M I D card. 1 1 i s not 
part of a di ni ng pi an: itcs so much more! I f you have a resi dent di ni ng pi an, Terrapi n Express 
expands your abi I ity to purchase goods and servi ces on campus: everywhere that accepts cash on 
campus accepts Terrapi n Express. Students I i vi ng i n campus apartments or off-campus can access 
on-campus food, goods and services. See di ni ng.umd.edu for parti ci pati ng di ni ng and non-di ni ng 
I ocati ons and to enrol I i n Terrapi n Express. 



Department of Fraternity and Sorority L ife 

1110 Stamp Student Union 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 64 



301-314-7172 
www.greek.uird.edu 

Office Hours: Monday- Friday. 8:30 am - 5:00 p. m 

The Department of Fraternity and Sorority Life oversees al I recognized social and community 
servi ce- based f raterniti es and sororiti es. Staff withi n the department provi de advi si ng and support 
for the chapter members, thei r I eadershi p, and the I eadershi p of four student governi ng counci I s: the 
I nterfraternity Council (IFC), the Panhdlenic Association (PHA), the Pan-Hellenic Council (PHC) 
andtheUnited Greek Council (UGC). The department also manages the 21 university-owned 
fraternity and sorority houses and provides resources for the off-campus fraternity arid sorority 
houses. 

University Hedth Center (UHC) 

Campus D ri ve, B ui I di ng 140 
301-314-8180 
301-405-9755 (fax) 
health@umd.edu 
www.health.umd.edu 

Hours of Operation: 

Monday- Friday: 8:00a.m. - 6:00 p. m 
Saturday: 9:00 am - 12:00 p.m. 
Sunday: Closed 

The University Health Center (UHC) is a nationally accredited ambulatory health care 
facility located on Campus Drive(across from the Stamp Student Union). All registered students 
living on or off-campus aredigibleto use the UHC. The UHC is open during the hours listed above, 
wi th vari ed hours duri ng semester breaks, hoi i days and summer sessi ons. V i si t the U H C websi te, 
www.health.umd.edu . for up-to-date i nf ormati on. Students are seen by appoi ntment for routi ne care 
8 a. m - 4: 30 p. m on weekdays. Some appoi ntments can be schedul ed onl i ne at 
www, myuhc. umd.edu . A limited number of same day appoi ntments are avai I abl e. M edi cal servi ces 
are I i ni ted after 5 p. m and on Saturdays. U rgent Care servi ces are avai I abl e wi thout an appoi ntment 
for the evaluation of urgent medical conditions. The After Hours Nursdine 301-314-9386, afree 
medi cal advi ce and i nf ormati on servi ce, i s avai I abl e to al I regi stered students when the U H C i s 
cl osed. Students shoul d al ways bri ng thei r i nsurance card to the U H C when seeki ng care. For 
I if e-threateni ng i 1 1 ness, i nj ury, or mental health emergenci es, cal I 911. 
C ©payments and Health I nsurance 

There are charges for al I medi cal servi ces. V i sit copayments wi 1 1 vary dependi ng on the type of 
i nsurance and servi ce provi ded. There i s al so a " M i ssed A ppoi ntment 1 fee. To avoi dthis fee, 
appoi ntments must be cancel ed or reschedul ed at I east 24 hours i n advance. Y ou may cancel or 
change an appoi ntment on-l i ne at www.myuhc.umd.edu or by cal I i ng (301) 314-8184. M onday 
massage and acupuncture appoi ntments must be cancel ed 72 hours i n advance of the appoi ntment. 
The Health Center is ableto bi 1 1 some i nsurance plans for the cost of services. Be sure to check with 
your i nsurance company to f i nd out whether or not they wi 1 1 cover servi ces provi ded at U H C . We 
are considered out-of-network with Poi nt of Service (POS) plans and cannot bi 1 1 H M Os (eg. Kaiser 
Permanente) or government i nsurance programs, such as M edi cai d and M edi care, at thi s ti me. 
Charges not covered by i nsurance are posted to the students B ursar Account or can be pai d at the 
ti me of vi si t i n the U H C . C harges can be pai d by cash, check, credi t cards, or Terrapi n Express at 
the UHC. The UHC Pharmacy participates with many pharmacy insurance plans. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 65 



The University Health Center Pharmacy participates with many pharmacy insurance plans. Mental 
H eal th and N utri ti on servi ces are not billed through i nsurance. T he fee for each mental heal th 
sessi on i s $15. PI ease cal I (301) 314-9144 if you have further questi ons about fees or usi ng your 
health insurance at the UHC. Frequently Asked Questions regarding health insurance are avail able at 
www, heal th. umd. edu/i nsurance 

Services 

Types of servi ces provi ded by the U H C i ncl ude Pri mary Care, U rgert Care, men's and women's 
reproductive health care, pharmacy, acupuncture, massage therapy, HIV testing, sports medicine, 
nutriti on, meditati on, mental health, eati ng di sorder, substance abuse, travel cl i ni c, al I ergy cl i ni c, 
i rrmunizations, health promotion, and the Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Program Dental 
Health Services at the University Health Center are provided and billed by the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore School of Dentistry. For information about dental servi ces cal I 301-314-9500. 
TheCenterfor Health and Wd I being(CHWB), a satellite of the UHC, is located in the Eppley 
Recreati on Center. 1 1 i s open duri ng the f al I and spri ng semesters, 9 a. m to 7 p. m M onday through 
Thursday and 9 to 5 p. m Fridays. Hours may vary duri ng the summer and wi nter sessions. The 
CHWB provides health promotion programs and services. It does not provide medical services. 
Students younger than 18 years wi 1 1 need perrni ssi on from a parent or I egal guardi an to be treated, 
except for mental health and sexual health services. For students 18 and older, treatment and visit 
i information wi 1 1 only be given to parents with the students consent or through a court ordered 
subpoena. I f the vi sit i s bi 1 1 ed through an i nsurance pol i cy, the i nsurance company may send 
detailed information concerning a medical visit to the pol icy holder (i.e. parent). 
Mandatory Health I nsurance 

A 1 1 undergraduate students regi stered for 6 or more credits are requi red to have health i nsurance. 
Students must provide proof of i nsurance by completi ng an on- 1 i ne waiver card each academic year. 
The waiver card can only be found on-l i ne at: www.fi rststudent.com 

Students have 2 options: 

1) Sdect hi Wish to Waived if you al ready have i nsurance (eg. through family plans or 
employer-sponsored plans). 

OR 

2) E I ect to enrol I i n the Student H eal th I nsurance Pol i cy by sd ecti ng hi Wish to Enrol 1 6 on the 
wai ver card. When choosi ng thi s opti on, your student account wi 1 1 be bi 1 1 ed f or the prerni um 

N OTE : Students who do not provi de proof of i nsurance wi 1 1 be automati cal I y enrol I ed i n the student 
health i nsurance provided by U ni ted Health Care and the annual prerni um wi 1 1 be charged to thd r 
Bursar Account. This is a non- refundable policy. 

G raduate Students are exempt from thi s requi rement. 

Additional i information on student i nsurance and Frequently Asked Questions can be found on the 
University Health Centercs web site htlp://www.healt^.urTrl.edu/mhifaq . 

I mmunization Requirements 

The U ni versity of M aryl and requi res al I new students, i ncl udi ng graduate and transfer students, to 
provi de proof of two i rrmuni zati on dates for M easl es, M umps, and Rubd I a ( M M R) A 1 1 
international students must also document 2 doses of M easles, M umps and Rubd la (M .M .R.) and a 
Tuberculosis (TB) test completed within the past six months in the United States. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 66 



M aryl and State L aw requi res students I i vi ng i n resi dence hallsto provi de proof of vacci nati on 
agai nst meni ngococcal meni ngi ti s or a si gned wai ver stati ng that they have chosen not to recei ve the 
vaccination. 

The I mrunization Record trust be subrritted to the University Health Center at Orientation, no later 
than the first day of class. Compl eted forms can al so be faxed to 301-314-5234. Fai I ure to submit a 
compl eted I mmuni zati on Record wi 1 1 resul t i n a Regi strati on B I ock for the future semester and a 
non-compliance fee will be assessed. The Regi strati on Block will be removed after the 
I mmunization Record has been submitted and processed. The I mmunization Record form is 
avai lable at www.health.umd.edu. 

Emergencies 

If students have a health emergency when the Health Center is closed, they should cal I 911. A I ist of 
local hospital informationisavailableontheUHC website. The UHCand the University assumes no 
f i nanci al responsi bi I i ty for care recei ved off campus. 

Housing Resident Life 

1102 Annapolis Hall 
301-314-2100 
reslife@umd.edu 
www.resnet.umd.edu 

The Department of Resi dent L if e i s responsi bl e for management of the resi dence hal I s as wd I as the 
cultural, educational, recreational and social programs and activities for residential students. 

Whi le I i vi ng i n a M aryl and residence hal I is not requi red, ni ne of every ten students i n M aryland's 
freshman cl ass make the choi ce to I i ve on campus. M ore than 90 prof essi oral and graduate staff and 
over 400 undergraduate student empl oyees meet the needs of resi dent students. 

There are rooms for approxi matdy 8,900 undergraduate students i n 37 residence hal Is. Three 
di ff erent sty I es of I i vi ng are avai I abl e to campus resi dents: tradi ti oral hal I s, sui tes, and apartments. 
Within traditional housing, where most first-year residents live, single, double, triple and quadruple 
room occupancy exists. Our national ly acclai med I i vi ng-learni ng programs i ncl ude Beyond the 
Classroom CIVICUS, Col lege Park Scholars, Digital Cultures and Creativity, Entrepreneurshipand 
Innovation, FLEXUS:TheDr. MarilynBermanPollans'WonreninEngineeringLiving& Learning 
Community, Gemstone, Global Communities, Hinman CEOs, Honors Humanities, Integrated Life 
Sciences, J irrenez- Porter Writers' House, Language House, University Honors, and the Virtus 
E ngi neeri ng Program A 1 1 of these programs add to the di versi ty of on-campus housi ng opti ons. A 1 1 
rooms have a cabl e and data j ack for each student. O ne td ephone jackis provi ded i n each room. 

F i rst-ti me freshmen are guaranteed on-campus housi ng provi ded they return thd r M aryl and PI anner 
i ncl udi ng the Enrol I ment Corf i rmation and Housi ng and Di ni ng Services Agreement along with the 
$400 enrol I ment deposit, by M ay 1. Transfer students who want to I i ve on campus should complete 
the M aryl and Planner as wd I arid wi 1 1 be al lotted housi ng on a space avai lable basis. 



Office of Student Conduct 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces P 3 ^ 67 



2118 Mitchell Building 

301-314-8204 

301-314-9533 

Director: Andrea Goodwin, Ph.D. 

studentconduct@umd.edu 

www.studentconduct. umd.edu 

The rri ssi on of the Off i ce of Student Conduct i s to resol ve al I egati ons of rri sconduct under the Code 
of Student Conduct and the Code of Academe I ntegrity'm a manner consistent with the core values 
of f ai rness, honesty, and i ntegri ty, whi I e promoti ng the U ni versi ty 's educati onal rri ssi on. E nhanci ng 
the development of character, civility, citizenship, individual/community responsibility, and ethics is 
essential to this mission. University students play a significant role in considering the behavior of 
thei r peers and are asked to assume positions of responsi bi I ity as members of the university's student 
j udi ci ary. The f ol I owi ng tenets gui de thi s rri ssi on: 

• To regard each student as an individual deserving of individual attention, consideration, and 
respect. 

• To consi der the facts f ul I y and careful I y before resol vi ng any case. 

• To speak candidly and honestly with each student. 

• To hoi d each student to a hi gh standard of behavi or, both to protect the campus community, 
and to promote student ethi cal devd opment. 

• Torecognizethereality of human fallibility, as well as the stresses associated with collegiate 
I ife, and to demonstrate compassion, understandi ng, and a sense of humor. 

• To contri bute to the educati onal rri ssi on of the U ni versi ty by desi gni ng pol i ci es, conduct] ng 
programs, and off eri ng i nstructi on that contri bute to the i ntd I ectual and ethi cal devd opment 
of the end re student body- 
General Statement of Student Responsi bi I ity. Students are expected to conduct themsdves at al I 

ti mes i n a manner consi stent with the U ni versity responsi bi I ity of ensuri ng to al I members of the 
campus communi ty the opportuni ty to pursue thd r educati onal obj ecti ves, and of protecti ng the 
safety, wdfare, rights, and property of al I members of the campus community. Specific expectations 
for student conduct are ourJ i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct and the Code of Academe 
I ntegri ty. ( See www. presi dent, umd.edu/pol i ci es/) 

Discipli nary Procedures. Students accused of vi ol ati ng uni versi ty regul ati ons are accorded 
fundamental due process i n di sci pi i nary proceedi ngs. Formal rul es of evi dence, however, shal I not 
be appl i cabl e, nor shal I devi ati ons from prescri bed procedures necessari I y i nval i date a deci si on or 
proceedi ng unl ess si gni f i cant prej udi ce to one of the parti es may resul t. U ni versi ty procedures are 
ourJ i ned i n the Code of Student Conduct and Code of Academe I ntegri ty suppl emerted by materi al s 
provi ded by the Off i ce of Student Conduct to assi st students who are faci ng accusati ons of 
misconduct. 



Nyumburu Cultural Center 

Campus Drive 
301-314-7758 
301-314-0383 (fax) 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 68 



www.nyumburu.unxl.eclu 

The Nyumburu Cultural Center has served as a maj or resource of cultural , hi stori cal , and sod al 
programming at the University of Maryland, College Park for more than forty years. TheCenter 
works closely with student, faculty, arid community organizations. The Nyumburu Cultural Center 
offers a vari ety of soci o-cultural , musi cal , educati onal and artistic programs to the campus 
community. The nature of the diverse programming and activities is based on the African 
American, African, and Cari bbean Diaspora experience(s). Nyumburu is home of the M aryland 
Gospel Choir, Shades of Harlem (performing arts ensemble), The Black Explosion Newspaper, Male 
Spokesmodd Competition, M iss Unity Scholarship Pageant, J ukej oint, Gospd Happy Hour, 
Leadership Series, Nyumburu Jazz Club, KwanzaaCdebration, Cultural Dinner during Black 
History Month, Literature Conference, Homecoming Alumni Tailgate, Annual Talent Showcase, 
Annual Student Awards Banquet, Black Male I nitiative (BM I ) Program and Sisterhood of Unity 
and Love (SOUL). 

Nyumburu's staff are advisors to many campus student organizations: Black Student Union, African 
Student Association (ASA), The Maryland Gospd Choir, The Black Explosion Newspaper, Sigma 
Gamma R ho sorority I nc, Ddta Sigma Theta Inc., Alpha Nu Omega Sorority Inc., and Dimensions 
M odd i ng Group to name a few. 

Nyumburu presents Bl ues, J azz, and Gospd music concerts as wd I as academic courses i n Creative 
Writing (ENGL278C), Blues(AASP298V) andjazz (AASP298Z) for three credits each. Maryland 
Gospd Choir students earn l-credit(MUSC329E), and students who take EDCP108N, College and 
Career Advancement earn 1-credit. 

During the summer, Nyumburu sponsors a Summer Camp Program for students from the age of five 
to sixteen. Through this dynamic dght week program opportunities for youth to explore academic, 
arti sti c, and athletic i interests i n a rd axed and creati ve envi ronment are provi ded. Camp Shul e was 
establ ished to provide the chi Idren of M aryland faculty/staff and local youth with a diverse 
educational experience. 

The M ulti purpose Room Conference Rooms, Computer Labs, and the Nyumburu Amphitheatre of 
the Nyumburu Cultural Center are open to the students, faculty and staff of the U ni versity of 
M aryl and . Room reservati ons are al so avai I abl e at a norni nal cost for departmental and off-campus 
events and programs. Come i n and i nteract with us, meet other students and make your i deas and 
wishes known. Our staff goal is to make Nyumburu a cultural center that is, "Your Home Away 
from Home." 

Recreation Services, Campus 

1115 Eppley Recreation Center 
301-405-PLAY (Information) 
301-314-5454 (Rec-Check) 
www.crs.umd.edu 

Campus Recreation Services (CRS) offers a wide variety of recreation programs 
including aquatics, fitness programs, informal recreation, intramural sports, non-credit 
i nstructi on, outdoor recreati on, and sport cl ubs. C RS al so has some of the most 
advanced recreation, sports, and fitness facilities in the nation. The CRS fad I ities 
include the Eppley Recreation Center (ERC), Ritchie Coliseum Reckord Armory, 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 69 



ColeField House and the weight and fitness areas in the School of Public Health 
(SPH) building. 

The E ppl ey Recreati on Center offers excepti onal aquati c f aci I i ti es. The N atatori um 
(i ndoor pool ) consi sts of two pool s; a 50 meter 01 ympi c si zed pool and a shal I ow, 
i instructional pool . The Outdoor Aquatic Center houses a 25 yard by 25 meter 
recreati onal pool and a spl ash pool . The C RS aquati c program al so offers qual i ty 
i nstructi on i n I if eguard trai ni ng, pool operati ons, water safety i ncl udi ng group and 
pri vate/semi - pri vate swi m I essons. 

C RS offers a wi de vari ety of f i tness programs i ncl udi ng I ow- i impact, step, and water 
aerobics, cardio- boxing, and sport conditioning. CRS I nformal Recreation programs 
al low students to enjoy the r favorite activity at the r leisure, whether it is usi ng 
cardi ovascul ar equi pment, lifting we ghts, j oggi ng, or pi ayi ng racquetbal I , vol I eybal I , 
basketbal I or wal I ybal I . C RS has wei ght rooms and f i tness centers I ocated i n the E RC, 
Ri tchi e Col i seum, and SPH . The f i tness centers feature stai rcl i mbers, bi kes, rowers, 
total body condi ti oners, arc trai ners, and treadmi 1 1 s. Wei ght rooms have a vari ety of 
f ree-wei ghts and wei ght machi nes. 

Students I ooki ng to pi ay team or i ndi vi dual sports or take part i n sped al sporti ng 
events have to opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n the C RS I ntramural Sports or Sport C I ub 
programs. I n the I ntramural Sports program students can parti ci pate year- round i n 
team sports such as basketbal I , footbal I , and soccer. I ndi vi dual and dual sports i ncl ude 
golf, racquetbal I , and many more. I ntramural sports are structured activities that are 
open to al I men and women from the campus communi ty . Parti ci pants can sd ect the r 
own level of competition and play in either men's, women's, grad/fac/staff or coed 
leagues. 

The Sport C I ub program offers students the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n competi ti ve 
sport activities, I earn new ski 1 1 s, and enj oy the recreati onal and sod al f el I owshi p 
deri ved from sports i nvol vement. Sport C I ubs are student- 1 ead organi zati ons that may 
be ori ented toward competi ti on, teachi ng, recreati on, or any combi nati on of these. 
There are 43 Sport CI ubs, i ncl udi ng Bal I room Dance, Lacrosse, BI ack Bel t, Wushu, 
and Soccer. 

The Outdoor Recreation Center (ORC) is located i n the northwest corner of the Eppley 
Recreation Center. The ORC offers outdoor adventures and cl i nics throughout the 
year. Take a backpacki ng tri p, learn how to rock cl i mb, or try white- water kayaki ng. 
The C I i mbi ng Wal I and C hal I enge Course are two features of the ORC where students 
may chal I enge themsel ves both physi cal I y and mental I y, i ncreasi ng i nterpersonal ski 1 1 s 
and sdf-conf i dence The ORC al so has a resource I i brary for pi anni ng your own tri ps 
and equi pment rental s. 

The Campus Bi ke Shop is a one-of-a-ki nd bi ke shop. All services are FREE. I n true 
Dl Y fashion the mechanics on staff wi 1 1 teach you how to fix your bi ke, or you can do 
it yourself with our tools. The Bi ke Shop is convenientiy located i n Cole Field House 
on the north end, lower level - near the tunnel entrance. 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page ? u 

Rdicjous Procj-ams 

1101 Memorial Chapel 
301-314-9866 (Chapel Reservations) 
www.chapd .umd.edu 

The f ol I owi ng chapl ai ns and the r servi ces are avai I abl e 

Baptist 

M rs. J essi ca Senasack 2120 M emori al C hapd 

301-405-8443 
jessbcm@umd.edu 

Black Ministries 

Rev. Dr. Ruby Moone 1112 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8445 
Rrmoone2@aol .com 

Christian Science 

M r. Bob Snyder 2118 M emori al Chapel 

301-474-0403 
rsnyder@umd.edu 

Church of J esus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) 

(Mormon) 

M r. Denni s M onson 7601 M owatt L ane, Col I ege Park 

301-422-7570 
monsondb@l dschurch.org 

Orthodox 

Rev. Kosmas Karavd las 2747 Ri va Road 

Annapolis, MD 21401 

410-573-2072 

f atherkosmas@schgochurch. org 

Episcopal/Anglican 



3. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Page 71 



Rev. PeterArtoci 



2116 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8453 

eaterps@uird.edu 



Hindu 

Ms. KiranSankhla 



2112 Memorial Chapel 

240-731-6886 

murari s2002@yahoo.com 



Jewish-Hilld 

Rabbi Ari Israel 



H i 1 1 d J ewi sh Student Center 

7612 M owatt Lane, Col lege Park 

301-422-6200 

ai srad @maryl andhi lld.org 



Jeuuish-Chabad 

Rabbi Eli Backman 



Chabad J ewi sh Student Center 
7403 H opki ns A ve. , Col I ege Park 
301-277-2994 
chabad@umd.edu 



Lutheran 

Rev. Raymond Ranker 



2103 Memorial Chapd 

301-405-8448 

lutheran@umd.edu 



Muslim 

Mr. Tarif Shraim 



2118 Memorial Chapd 

240-671-9321 

tshrai m@gmai I .com 



Reman Catholic 

Fr. Rob Walsh 



Cathol i c Student Center 

4141 Guilford Rd., College Park 

301-864-6223 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 72 

f rrob@cathol i cterps.org 
United Campus Ministry 

(Presbyterian, Disci pies of Christ, United Church of Christ) 

Rev. Holly Ulmer 2101 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8450 
ulmer@umd.edu 

United Methodist 

2102 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8451 

umc@umd.edu 



Transportation Services 

Regents Drive Garage 
301-314-PARK (X47275) 
transportati on@umd.edu 
www.transportation.umd.edu 
301-314-2255 

Pleaseconsider walking biking car sharingfcarpodling, and ridng Shuttle-UM asaltematiuesto 
bringing a si n&e occupancy uEhideto campus, 

Shuttie-UM 

The Shuttle-UM transit system operated by the Department of Trans-portation Services (DOTS), is 
predominantly supported by student fees. ShutrJe-UM provides commuter, evening, NITE Ride, 
paratransit, and charter services to U ni versity students, faculty, and staff whi I e classes are i n session. 
DOTS publ i shes a Campus Connecti ons transit gui de each semester. Campus Connecti ons gui des 
contai n al I of our current bus schedul es as wd I as general i nf orrnati on about getti ng around i n the 
D.C. M etro area. Campus Connections guides are avai lable at the DOTS office i n Regents Drive 
Garage, The Stamp I nformati on Desk, resi dence hal I s, and on the DOTS website. M ore i nformati on 
about Shuttle-UM is avai I able online at: http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/shutrj e. html . 

Zimride 

Zi mride is a carpool i ng database avai lable to U M D students and employees. Itcs a great way to f i nd 
a carpool partner for dai I y commuti ng or one-ti me tri ps. Si gn up for Zi mri de by I oggi ng i nto 
http://zi mri de. umd.edu/ with a U M D Di rectory I D and password, then post your commute to f i nd 
carpool partners. DOTS al so offers preferred parki ng and reduced parki ng rates for carpool ers for 
members of the TerpRi ders Carpool program For more i nformati on about TerpRi ders, cl i ck the 
appropri ate yd I ow button on thi s page of the DOTS website 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 73 



http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/bi ke. html . 

Zipcar 

Zi pear i s a membershi p- based car shari ng system avai I abl e on the U M D campus f or U M D students 
as young as 18 years ol d. Car shari ng i s a great opti on for students who may onl y need occasi onal 
access to a car on campus. Zi pear fees i ncl ude gasol i ne and i nsurance. For more i nf ormati on about 
becorni ng a Zi pear member, pi ease vi sit http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/share. html . 

Biking 

The University of M aryland has been designated a Bicycle Friendly Campus by the League of 
American Bicyclists. BikeUMD i s the secti on of DOTS responsible for managing and promoting 
bi ki ng on campus. We offer cl i ni cs, di scounted safety gear, sponsored events, ri des, and bi cycl e 
regi strati on. B i keU M D al so col I aborates with the Campus B i ke Shop, whi ch offers free bi ke 
mai ntenance and bi ke rental s for j ust $70/semester. For more i nformati on about bi ki ng, pi ease vi sit 
http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/bi ke. html . 

Parking 

Students who wi sh to park on campus must regi ster to do so onl i ne before bri ngi ng a car to campus. 
Student parki ng regi strati on takes pi ace onl i ne i n J ul y (annual or f al I -onl y parki ng) and i n J anuary 
(for the spri ng term) . Parki ng regi strati ons are bi 1 1 ed to student accounts after the semester has 
begun. Parki ng i s assi gned on a f i rst come, f i rst served basi s accordi ng to credit I evd and housi ng 
status. PI ease note Due to constructi on proj ects on campus, the number of parki ng spaces coul d be 
dramatical I y reduced i n the upcorni ng semesters. Freshmen and sophomores I i vi ng on campus are 
digibleto regi ster for parki ng, but may not be i n future years. For more i nformati on about student 
parki ng, pi ease vi sit the DOTS website http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/student html . 

Transportation to New York, New J ersey, and BWI Airport 

DOTS provi des transportati on f or U M D students to and from Port A uthori ty, N ew Y ork, M etropark, 
N ew J ersey, and B WI A i rport for Thanksgi vi ng, Wi nter, and Spri ng B reaks. Shuttl e servi ce to 
NY/NJ is $50 round trip or $30 one way; shuttle service to BWI Airport is free. Registration dates 
and departure ti mes are posted to the DOTS website at I east one month before the tri ps depart. 

Motorized Scooters 

Parki ng regi strati on i s requi red for any motori zed scooter parked on campus. M otori zed scooter 
dri vers are al so requi red to wear a hd met whi I e operati ng or ri di ng on a scooter. A ny motori zed 
scooter I eft unattended i n an area not desi gnated for scooter or motorcycl e parki ng i s subj ect to 
i mmobi I ization. Please visit the DOTS website for more i nformati on about motorized scooters 
http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/scooter. html . For a map of existi ng motorized scooter parki ng 
I ocati ons, vi sit the DOTS website at: http://www.transportati on. umd.edu/maps. html . 

Social Media 

Whi I e the DOTS website i s the best pi ace to get i nformati on about DOTS servi ces, we al so mai ntai n 
Twitter and Facebook pages for real -ti me i nteracti on with the U M D community. We bri ng news, 
contests, giveaways, relevant programmi ng, and i nformati on about campus events to students via the 
@DOTS_U M D and @Shutti e_U M Twitter accounts, as wd I as the B i keU M D and DOTS U M D 
Facebook pages. Fol I ow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com and I i ke us on Facebook at.www.f acebook 
www.facerjook.com 



Leadership and Community Service Learning 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 74 



0110 Add e H . Stamp Student U ni on - Center for Campus L if e 

301-314-8494 

www.thestamp. umd.edu/l csl 

Leadership & Community Service- Learning (LCSL) promotes positive social change through 
transformative learni ng and community engagement. Through our val ues (col lecti ve approach, 
soci al responsi bi I ity, pri nci pi ed practi ce, critical i nqui ry, and engaged schol arshi p), we work with 
students, staff, faculty, and community members to achieve our vision of a social ly j ust world. 

Co-Curricular Leadership Programs 

Out-of-dassroom leadership conference, institutes, retreats, and programs focused on teaching 
leadershi p for social change. The program recognizes leadershi p as an abi I ity that can be devdoped 
i n al I peopl e, openi ng doors for i ndi vi dual growth and soci al change. Si gnature programs i nd ude the 
Peer Leadership Council (PLC), The Terrapin Leadership Institute (TLI), O.N.E. UMD Student 
Organization Leadershi p Conference, the M aryland Leadershi p Conference, M OSAI C Diversity and 
Leadershi p Retreat, Voices of Social Change, and Turtle Camp. 

C utricular Leadership 

Curri cul ar offeri ngs i nd ude credit- beari ng coursework coveri ng a range of topi cs i nd udi ng 
I eadershi p theory and practi ce, I eadershi p ethi cs, di versi ty in I eadershi p, and group and 
organizational processes. Courses on leadership and identity and other special topics are also 
avai I abl e. Students may al so pursue a M i nor i n Leadershi p Studi es, offered through the Department 
of Counsding, Higher Education, and Special Education in the Col lege of Education. 

Other curri cul ar programs i nd ude 

• Capital One Leadershi p I nternshi p Program (CLIP), i ntegrati ng academic leadershi p courses, a 
Fal I i nternshi p, a Spri ng i nternati onal i mmersi on tri p to U ganda, and team col I aborati on. 

• Onl i ne resources for faculty to support service- learni ng i nitiati ves i n the classroom i nd udi ng a 
faculty f d I ow program to enhance servi ce-l earni ng across curri cul urns. 

America Reads*America Counts (AR*AC ) 

I n col I aborati on with the Pri nee George's County Publ i c School system A meri ca Reads*A meri ca 
Counts (A R* A C ) provi des hi gh qual i ty mentori ng i n I ocal school s that enri ches I earni ng 
opportuni ti es for both col I ege and d ementary school students. A pproxi matd y 200 M ary I and federal 
work-study, vol unteer, and i ntern students serve as readi ng and math mentors and work with 
f ami I i es on I iteracy i n 18 Pri nee George's County d ementary school s. The three core mentori ng 
programs are A meri ca Reads ( 1 ^ and 2 n d graders, worki ng on readi ng and wri ti ng ski 1 1 s) , A meri ca 
Counts (4th graders, worki ng on math ski lis), and Partners i n Pri nt (worki ng with Spanish-speaki ng 
f ami I i es on techni ques to encourage readi ng at home) . 

Local Community Service-Learning 

Community Service- Learni ng programs engage students on campus i n meani ngf ul community 
servi ce-l earni ng with the local community through resources, programs, and events. We seek to 
expl ore the compl exi ti es of soci al i ssues, encourage critical tni nki ng, and take acti on to address 
community needs and bui I d upon community assets. Si gnature programs i nd ude Terps for Change, 
TerpCorps, H unger & H omd essness A wareness Week, Terp Servi ce Days and Terp Servi ce 
Weekends, the M -Pact Retreat, U M Serves vol unteer opportunity I i stserv, Servi ceL i nk partner 
database, and our Community I nvol vement I nternshi p Program 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 75 



Immersion Experiences & Alternative Breaks 

The Alternative Breaks (AB) program provides substance-free, 7-10 day community 
service- 1 earni ng tri ps duri ng the uni versitycs wi nter, spri ng, and summer breaks. Student parti ci pants 
travel local ly, national ly, and i international ly i n teams to different cities, engage i n active service, and 
have the opportuni ty to gai n new perspecti ves on soci al i ssues whi I e meeti ng communi ty needs and 
building upon community assets. Students work with i ssues of di saster rd i ef , envi ronmental 
restorati on, pri son systems, HIV/AIDS, educati on, home! essness, and heal thcare. A B cs mai n goal i s 
to educate parti ci pants about the root causes of these i ssues whi I e maki ng an i rrmedi ate difference i n 
the communiti es i n whi ch they serve. Opportuniti es to be i nvol ved i ncl ude as tri p parti ci pants, tri p 
leaders, AB interns, staff/faculty advisors, and staff mentors. 

National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP)i vwuw.ndp.umd.edu 

TheNational Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs (NCLP), through the development of cutting 
edge resources, i nf ormati on shari ng, and symposi a, supports I eadershi p devd opment i n col I ege 
students by servi ng as a central source of prof essi onal devd opment for I eadershi p educators across 
theglobe. H oused at the Uni versity of Maryland si nee its creation in the 1990s, NCLP works to 
connect I eadershi p educators to one another and support those devd opi ng I eadershi p programs on 
thd r own campuses. N C L P i s known worl d- wi de for promoti ng the Soci al C hange M odd of 
L eadershi p Devd opment. 

E ngagement and Activities 

0110 Stamp Student Union 

301-314-7174 

www.thestamp.umd.edu 

The mission of Engagement and Activities areas is to support and complement the university's 
acaderri c mi ssi on and to enhance the educati onal experi ence of students through exposure and 
parti ci pati on i n soci al , cul tural , recreati onal , I eadershi p, i ntd I ectual , and governance acti vi ti es. 

Student Organization Resource Center. Registers al I student organizations at the university and 
provi des an onl i ne di rectory of more than 800 groups. Organi zati on support servi ces i ncl udes: 
accounti ng assi stance, advi sors 1 workshops, I eadershi p trai ni ng programs for organi zati on I eaders, 
i nvol vement sessi ons offered for cl asses and semester ori entati ons are some of the ways 
i nvol vement is nurtured for organizations and i ndivi duals. I n addition, First Look Fai r and Stampfest 
are I arge-scal e i nvol vement f ai rs hd d at the begi nni ng of each semester to showcase the student 
groups and organizations. 

Organization Advising. M aj or student groups such as the Student Government Associ ati on, 
Graduate Student Government, Peer Leadership Council, TerpVets, the Homecoming Committee, 
and Student E ntertai nment Events reed ve di rect advi si ng from E ngagement and A cti vi ti es staff. 
Other student groups can al so obtai n hd p by request. Assi stance i n prograrrrri ng, securi ng a faculty 
advi sor, off i cer transi ti ons, and efforts to create a new organi zati on i s avai I abl e. 

Off-Campus Student I nvol vement Engaging off-campus students at the Uni versity of Maryland 
through social, educational, and outreach programs. 

Programs and Leisure Learning Opportunities. Staff mentors student volunteers and leaders to 
provi de opti ons for out of cl ass engagement through recreati onal opti ons that i ncl udes: the H off 
Theater, the A rt and Learni ng Center (offeri ng non-credit courses), the Stamp Gal I ery (f eaturi ng 
regul ar di spl ays of the vi sual arts) , the TerpZone ( bowl i ng, bi 1 1 i ards, and more) , as wd I as Stamp 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 76 



Special Events and Programs. 



Multicultural I nvolvement and Community Advocacy 

1120 Stamp Student Union 
301-314-8600 
rri ca-contact@umd.edu 

The M ulti cultural I nvolvement and Community Advocacy Office (M ICA), is a unit within the A del e 
H . Stamp Student U ni on - Center for Campus L i f e and the D i vi si on of Student Aff ai rs. I n support 
of the University's commitment to diversity, multicultural ism and social justice, we advance a 
purposeful campus cl i mate that capi tal i zes on the educati onal benef i ts of di versi ty, through 
student-centered advising, advocacy, programs, research, and practices. We encourage student 
i nvolvement and engagement i n the campus and community. M I CA serves al I students and seeks to 
empower them through education on issues of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, 
gender expressi on, rd i gi on and thei r i ntersecti ons. A 1 1 of the acti vi ti es, programs, servi ces and 
research of MICA strive towards meetirg the common outcome of developing "good citizens" and 
committed leaders. 

Off-Campus Housing Services 

1110 Stamp Student Union 
301-314-3645 
301-314-9874 
www.och.umd.edu 

The Off-Campus Housi ng Services Office provides i information and resources about housi ng and 
off-campus I i vi ng. Resources avai I abl e onl i ne i ncl ude OC H 101 a searchabl e housi ng database 
listing avai I abl e rental properti es i n the area; Roommate F i nder, another web- based database where 
students create a prof i I e and search for others with si rri I ar housi ng needs and i nterests; as wd I as an 
extensive array of educati onal materials. For assistance in locating housing, please visit 
www.och.umd.edu or contact our office 

Adele H. Stamp Student Union - Center for Campus L ife 

Stamp Student U ni on 

301-314-DESK 

www.thestamp.umd.edu 

TheAddeH. Stamp Student Union- Center for Campus Life is the university's "community 
center." More than 25,000 students, faculty, staff members, and campus guests visitthe Stamp daily 
to take advantage of its servi ces, programs, and f aci I iti es. Our rri ssi on i s to create and sustai n a 
student-centered environment that promotes academic success and personal devdopment; serves as 
a safe and inviting campus center; and is characterized by a strong corrTTitrrent to multicultural ism 
excd lence, and a positive work envi ronment 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 77 



The Stamp offers I ounge space, a vari ety of i nf ormati on servi ces, recreati on and I ei sure acti vi ti es, 
student-sponsored programs, visual arts, retail outlets, and more than 40,000 square feet of 
reservable space. 

I nfo r mation Services 

• Information Center located on the first floor, 301-314-DESK 

• B ul I eti n boards I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

• D i spl ay showcases I ocated throughout the bui I di ng 

Recreation and Leisure 

• TerpZone, including full -service bowling lanes, "Cosmic Bowling," billiard tables, video 
games, and three big-screen TVs, 301-314-BOWL 

Student-Sponsored Programs 

• Student Entertai nment Events (SEE), a student-di rected program board whose committees 
plan games, tournaments, concerts, lectures, outdoor recreation trips, 301-314-8359 

• Graduate Student Government, 301-314-8630 

Art and Learning Center, 301-314-ARTS 

• A rt and Learni ng Center, a vi sual arts work and teachi ng center, offeri ng mi ni -courses and arts 
services 

• Stamp Gallery, I ocated on the first floor 

Food and Retail Outlets 

• Capital One Bank, 301-864-8722 

• University Book Center (basement level), 301-314-BOOK 

• Food Services: Maryland Food Co-op (301-314-8089), Saladworks (301-314-0947), Taco Bell 
(301-314-6569), McDonald's (301-314-1489), Adde's Restaurant (301-314-8022), Coffee Bar 
(301-314-CAFE), Panda Express (301-314-6111), Sbarros (301-314-4105), Sushi by Panda 
(301-314-6111), Chick-Fil-A (301-314-6568), Subway (301-266-7827), Moby Dick 
(301-405-6531), Auntie Anne's (301-314-6569) 

• Terrapi n Shi ppi ng and M ai I i ng, a f ul I -servi ce postal and packagi ng faci I ity, 301-314-9982 

• Ticket Office, offering campus performance tickets, 301-314-TKTS 

• Union Shop 301-314-7467, featuring snacks, sodas, newspapers, and magazines 

• Terrapi n Technol ogy Store, offeri ng di scounted computers, software, i Pods and i Pads, 
301-314-7000 

Reservable Space 

The Stamp offers meeti ng rooms that accommodate groups from 8 to 1,000 peopl e For reservati ons, 
or cateri ng i nf ormati on, contact the Stamp Reservati on Off i ce, 301-314-8488. 

AdeleH. Stamp Student Union -Center for Campus Life Hours 

The Stamp is open M onday through Thursday, 7 am to midnight; Friday, 7 am to 1:30 am; 
Saturday, 8 am to 1:30 am, and Sunday, 11 am to midnight. 

See other A del e H . Stamp Student U ni on - Center for Campus L i f e H ours off i ces and servi ces 
d sewhere i n Chapter 3 

Community Service- Learning Office 
Campus Programs 



3. Campus A dmi ni strati on, Resources, and Student Servi ces Page 78 



M ulti cultural I nvol vement and Community Advocacy 
Religious Programs 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P^ 79 

4 Registration, Academic Requirements* and Regulations 

Decree I tirot iiiaoon 

Decree Requirements 

The requi rements for graduati on vary accord ng to the character of work i n the different col I eges, 
school s, departments and acaderri c units. 1 1 i s the responsi bi I ity of the col I eges, school s, 
departments and other acaderri c uni ts to establ i sh and publ i sh cl earl y def i ned degree requi rements. 
Responsi bi I ity for knowi ng and meeti ng al I degree requi rements for graduati on i n any curri cul um 
rests wi th the student. Sped f i c degree requi rements are I i sted in this catal og under the col I ege and/or 
department as appropri ate. 

Each student should check with the proper academic authorities no later than the close of the junior 
year to ascertai n hi s or her standi ng with respect to advancement toward a degree. For thi s purpose, 
each student shoul d be sure to revi ew thei r semester grades and unoff i ci al transcri pt on the M yU M 
website ( www.nry.umd.edu ) at the cl ose of each semester or request a semester grade report. 

L Residency Requirement 

a. A 1 1 candi dates for undergraduate degrees from the U ni versi ty of 

M aryl and, Col I ege Park, must take a rri ni mum of 15 credits i n courses 
numbered 300 or above, i ncl udi ng at I east 12 credits i n the maj or f i el d. 

b. A 1 1 candi dates for undergraduate degrees from the U ni versi ty of 

M aryl and, Col I ege Park must take a rri ni mum of 30 credits i n resi dence. 
Normal I y these 30 credits wi 1 1 be the f i nal 30 credits counted toward the 
degree. However, credits from University-approved study abroad and 
i nternshi p programs, and a maxi mum of 6 credits that are not part of such 
programs, may be i ncl uded i n the f i nal 30 if approved i n advance by the 
dean of the acaderri c uni t from whi ch the student expects to recei ve the 
degree. 

Z Enrollment in Majors 

A student wlio is digible to remain at the University of Maryland, College Park, may transfer 
among curricula, col leges, or other academic units except where I i imitations on enrol I ments have 
been approved. By the ti me they compl ete 60 credits, students are expected to decl are a 
degree-granti ng maj or. Students must be enrol I ed i n the maj or program from whi ch they pi an to 
graduate, when regi steri ng for the f i nal fifteen hours of the baccal aureate program Thi s requi rement 
al so appl i es to the thi rd year of the combi ned, pre- prof essi onal degree programs. A I so see 
i nf ormati on on doubl e maj ors and doubl e degrees d sewhere i n thi s chapter. 
3. Credit Requirements 

N o baccal aureate degree wi 1 1 be awarded i n i nstances where fewer than 120 credi t hours have been 
earned. M any undergraduate curri cul a at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, requi re more 
than 120 credits. It the responsibility of each student to familiarize himsdf or hersdf with the 
requi rements of parti cul ar curri cul a. The student i s urged to seek advi ce on these matters from the 
departments, col I eges, or the Off i ce of the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es. To earn a 
baccal aureate from the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, a rri ni mum of 30 credi ts must be 
taken i n resi dence (see above) . 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P 3 ^ 80 



4 Grade Point Average 

A nri ni mum cumulative 2.0 grade poi nt average is requi red for graduation i n al I curricula. A higher 
average may be requi red by the i ndi vi dual department, col I ege, school , or program 

Begi nni ng with students matri cul ati ng i n Fal I 2012, to be awarded a baccal aureate degree, students 

must have a rri ni mum C (2.00) cumul ati ve grade poi nt average across al I courses used to sati sfy 

maj or degree requi rements, nri nor requi rements, and undergraduate certif i cate requi rements. 

I ndi vi dual department, col I ege, school , or program requi rements may exceed thi s rri ni mum. 

5. Completion of I nterrupted Degree 

Students whose regi strati on at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, has I apsed for more than 10 

years shal I be requi red to compl ete a rri ni mum of 15 credit hours at Col I ege Park after thei r return 

to campus i n order to earn a baccal aureate degree. 

Recommendati ons about courses needed to sati sfy the remai ni ng degree requi rements wi 1 1 be made 

at the department I evd , with approval of the Dean's Off i ce requi red. The reason for requi ri ng these 

credi ts i s that many fields change suffi ci enti y i n 10 years to requi re that students take current courses 

if they are to be awarded a current degree. Excepti ons to the requi rement for a rri ni mum of 15 

credits earned at Col I ege Park upon return to the campus can be recommended by the Deans for 

approval i n the Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for A cademi c Aff ai rs. 

Student Academic Success-Decree Completion Policy 

The goal of the Student Acaderri c Success- Degree Compl eti on Pol i cy i s to promote undergraduate 
student success. The poi i cy establ i shes a structured framework to gui de al I students to compl eti on of 
an undergraduate degree withi n a reasonable period of ti me. Academic units provide 4-year 
tempi ates that students can use to devd op a program of study that wi 1 1 meet the course requi rements 
for a degree. Students are responsi bl e for devd opi ng pi ans of study, wi th the assi stance of thd r 
acaderri c advi sers. Acaderri c units monitor student progress and assi st students at ri sk of f al I i ng 
behi nd benchmarks i n thd r pi ans. The poi i cy i n essence establ i shes a process to provi de a pathway 
to compl eti on of a degree for each student, i ni ti al I y created and then adj usted over ti me as needed to 
meet each srijdentsrjarti cul ar circumstances. The policy is described in more detail in the section on 
Academic Advising. (References to the poi icy http://www. uast.urTrl.edu/acaderricsuccess.html and 
to frequently asked questions: http://www.uast.umd.edu/faqs-successpol icy.htrri )." 



Minors 

M i nors afford students the opportunity to pursue a I i rri ted but structured concentrati on i n a coherent 
fidd of study outsi de thd r major. The minor may bea truncated version of a major or a distinctive 
i ntd I ectual subset of adiscipline. Mi nors are not offered i n every f i d d of study. Students shoul d 
i nqui re wi th departments for current avai I abi I i ty of rri nors or see i ndi vi dual I i sti ngs on thi s si te. 
The structures of rri nors vary i n detai I , but, with rare excepti ons, they al I requi re no fewer than 15 
and no more than 24 credits with at I east 9 credits in upper divi si on courses ( 300 1 evd or above). No 
more than six credits (or two courses) may be appl ied to satisfy both the requi rements of a rri nor 
and a maj or program N o course may be used to sati sfy the requi rements of more than one rri nor. 
All courses taken for a mi nor must be completed with a rri ni mum grade of C-. A rri ni mum C (2.00) 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average across al I courses used to sati sfy the rri nor i s al so requi red. 
To ensure appropri ate acaderri c advi si ng, students who wi sh to pursue a rri nor shoul d i nf orm both 
the col lege responsi blefor thd r major and the unit offeri ng the rri nor as early as possi ble, but i n no 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons ^ >S Q^ 81 



case I ater than one f ul I academi c year before the expected date of graduati on. When a student has 
compl eted al I requi rements for the rri nor, the unit offeri ng the rri nor shal I notify the students 
col I ege, whi ch veri f i es that the student has met al I requi rements and off i ci al I y noti f i es the Regi strar's 
Off i ce The compl eti on of a rri nor i s posted on the students off i ci al transcri pt onl y when the student 
compl etes al I requi rements for the bachd or's degree. 

I n February 2004, the University Senate voted to phase out academic citations and replace them with 
rri nors. Students pursui ng an acaderri c ci tati on shoul d contact the respecti ve department or program 
for i nf ormati on on thi s conversi on process. 

Second Majors and Second Decrees 

Second majors 

A student who wi shes to compl ete a second maj or concurrent] y wi th hi s or her pri mary maj or of 
record must obtai n written perrri ssi on i n advance from the appropri ate departments or programs and 
colleges. As early as possible, but in no case later than one full academic year before the expected 
date of graduati on, the student must f i I e wi th the department or programs i nvol ved and wi th the 
appropri ate deans, formal programs showi ng the courses to be offered to meet requi rements i n each 
of the maj ors and supporti ng areas as wd I as those of the col I ege and general educati on programs. 
A student who wishes to add a Limited Enrollment Program as a second major must do so at the 
earl i est possi bl e opportuni ty to assure that sped f i c credi t and G PA requi rements can be met. I n 
order to obtai n approval , students must compl ete al I of the requi rements specif i ed for both the 
pri mary and secondary maj or. Courses taken for one maj or may be counted as appropri ate as part of 
the degree requi rements for the general educati on programs. I f two col I eges are i nvol ved i n the 
doubl e maj or program the student must desi gnate whi ch col I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for the 
mai ntenance of records and certification of general education requi rements. Final approval of a 
doubl e maj or program must be obtai ned from each of the appropri ate departments and col I ege(s) . 

Second Degrees Taken Simultaneously 

A student who wi shes to recei ve two bachd or's degrees si mul taneousl y must sati sf actori I y compl ete 
the regularly prescri bed requi rements of both degree programs and a rri ni mum of 150 credits (180 
credits if one of the degrees i s i n Sped al Educati on) . At I east 18 of the credits appl i ed to one degree 
must be i n course work not appl i ed to the requi rements of the other degree program. As earl y as 
possi bl e, but i n no case I ater than one f ul I acaderri c year before the expected date of graduati on, the 
student must f i I e wi th the department or programs i nvol ved, as wd I as wi th the appropri ate deans, 
formal programs showi ng the courses to be offered to meet the maj or, supporti ng area, col I ege, and 
general educati on programs. I f two col I eges are i nvol ved i n the doubl e degree program the student 
must desi gnate whi ch col I ege wi 1 1 be responsi bl e for the mai ntenance of records and certi f i cati on of 
general education requi rements. Fi nal approval of a double degree program must be obtai ned from 
each of the appropri ate departments and col I ege(s) . 

Second Degrees Taken Sequentially 

A student who has completed the requi rements for, and has reed ved one baccalaureate and who 
wi shes to earn a second degree from the uni versi ty must sati sf actori I y compl ete al I of the prescri bed 
requi rements for the second degree and enough additi onal credits so that the total , i nd udi ng al I 
appl i cable credits earned at the university or dsewhere, is at least 150 credits (180 credits if one of 
the degrees i s i n Sped al Educati on) . At I east 18 of the credits appl i ed to one degree must be i n 
course work not appl i ed to the requi rements of the other degree program I n no case wi 1 1 a second 
baccal aureate be awarded to a student who has not compl eted a rri ni mum of 30 credits i n resi dence 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P^ 82 

at the university. 
Post-Baccalaureate Second Degree 

Students who matri cul ate to the U ni versi ty wi th a bachd or's degree from any regi onal I y accredi ted 
col I ege or uni versi ty wi 1 1 be consi dered to have sati sf i ed the U ni versi ty 's general educati on 
requi rements, regardl ess of when the degree was recei ved. 

Combined Bachelor 1 ^Master's Programs 

I n a combi ned bachd or's/master's program, some graduate I evd courses i ni ti al I y taken for 
undergraduate credit may al so be appl i ed towards the graduate credit requi rements for a master's 
degree program at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. A bachd or's/master's program may be devd oped for 
an i ndi vidual student, or it may be a structured program 

Individual Student Bachelor '^Master's Program A program may be devd oped by an individual 
student i n consul tati on wi th hi s/her academi c advi sor. Such a program i s avai I abl e onl y to students 
whose academi c performance i s excepti onal . 1 1 i s to be devd oped accordi ng to the i ndi vi dual career 
i interests and goal s of the student and shoul d be an i integrated I earni ng experi ence rather than merd y 
the compl eti on of a certai n number of graduate and undergraduate credits. The program requi res the 
approval of the di rectors of both the undergraduate and the graduate programs i nvol ved and of the 
Dean for Offi ce of U ndergraduate Studi es and the Dean of the G raduate School . N ormal I y, no more 
than ni ne credits of graduate courses appl i ed to the bachd or's degree may be counted al so for 
graduate credit i n an i ndi vidual student program Courses to be double-counted must be at the 600 
levd or above and must be passed with at least a 'B' grade. I ndi vidual study courses, i nternshi ps, or 
courses given credit by exarri nation are not d igi ble. The credits to be double-counted wi 1 1 be 
desi grated as appl i cabl e to the graduate program after the student reed ves the bachd or's degree and 
matriculates i n the Graduate School . This designation wi 1 1 be caned ed if the student withdraws from 
the graduate program before compl eti ng the master's degree. 

Structured Bachelor' ^Master's Program; A structured bachd or's/ master's program is an 
arti cul ated curri cul um combi ni ng an exi sti ng undergraduate program and an exi sti ng master's 
program at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, offered by the same or by di fferent departments. Such a 
program i s to be desi gned for students whose academi c performance i s excepti onal and shoul d be an 
i integrated I earni ng experi ence rather than merd y the compl eti on of a certai n number of graduate 
and undergraduate credits. A proposal for such a program should be submitted by the col lege(s) 
housi ng the academi c programs concerned and requi res the approval of the G raduate Counci I , the 
Graduate Dean, the Senate PCC Committee, and the Provost. 
N ecessary features of a structured bachd or's/master's program i ncl ude the f ol I owi ng: 

a. There must be specif i c requi rements for adrni ssi on to the combi ned program that 
speak to the excepti onal performance of the students to be adrni tted. At a mi ni mum 
students accepted for the program must be cl earl y adrri ssi bl e to the graduate program 
portion. 

b. The program shoul d be desi gned so as not to undul y dd ay the students reed pt of thd r 
bachd or's degrees. Taki ng graduate credits should not unduly I i mi t the breadth of the 
students experi ence through premature sped al i zati on. 

c. A 1 1 requi rements of the bachd or's program and of the master's program must be 
compl eted to reed ve the two degrees. Where appropri ate, graduate courses taken whi I e 
an undergraduate may substitute for courses requi red i n the undergraduate maj or 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P^ 83 



program 

d. The student may be offered deferred adrri ssi on to the graduate school at the end of 
the J uni or year program subj ect to compl eti on of the seni or year program i n a ti mel y 
fashion and with a specified level of achievement. Formal admission to the graduate 
school wi 1 1 requi re compl eti on of al I requi rements for the bachd or's degree 

e The credits to be doubl e-counted wi 1 1 be desi gnated as appl i cabl e to the graduate 
program after the student recei ves the bachd or's degree and matri cul ates i n the G raduate 
School . Thi s desi gnati on wi 1 1 be cancel ed if the student withdraws from the graduate 
program before compl eti ng the master's degree. 

A structured bachelor's/master's program may normal I y i ncl ude up to ni ne credits of graduate level 
courses (600 level and above) that are counted both for the bachelor's program and the master'ss 
program M ore than ni ne doubl e-counted credits may be al I owed if both of the f ol I owi ng conditi ons 
are satisfied. 

a. The additional graduate credits appl ied to the undergraduate program do not unduly 
I irrit the breadth of the students experience through premature specialization. This 
conditi on may be sati sf i ed, for exampl e, if the graduate credits substitute for courses 
requi red i n the undergraduate program that woul d have been taken i n any case, but at a 
I ess advanced level. 

b. The master's program requires substantially more than thirty credits. Thiscondition 
wi 1 1 be deemed to be sati sf i ed if the combi ned program with doubl e-counti ng, still 
requi res 150 or more credit hours to complete. 



Academic Advising 
Academic Advising 

Rdeof Advising 

A cademi c advi si ng i s an i ntegral part of each students educati onal experi ence and it takes many 
forms. A cademi c advi sors provi de students with i nf ormati on on academi c requi rements needed for 
degree compl eti on, hd p students pi an for future graduate study or a career, and serve as a research 
person. Academi c advi si ng i s a shared responsi bi I ity between the student and the advi sor. 

• Provide information on academic requirements needed for graduation. Advisors assist 
students i n devd opi ng an academi c and career pi an, monitor students i n the maj or, and di scuss 
how a course of study f i ts a parti cul ar academi c or career i nterest. A dvi sors answer questi ons 
concerning a specific academic concern, such as problems with a particular class, and guide 
students through the regi strati on process, i ncl udi ng provi di ng i nf ormati on on vari ous 

regi strati on bl ocks and what needs to be done to remove them 

• Hdp students plan for future graduate study or career. Advisors discuss how an 
academi c maj or can prepare a student for hi s/her career, and what career opti ons are 

avai I abl e A dvi sors refer students to the Career Center whi ch provi des career counsd i ng and 
workshops on i ssues such as writi ng resumes and prepari ng for j ob i ntervi ews. They al so 
i nform students about i nternshi p opportuniti es and how credit can be earned, and provi de 
i nf ormati on on study abroad programs that mi ght enri ch a students academi c experi ence as 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P 3 ^ ^4 



wd I as enhance thei r resume. Advi sons i nf orm students about graduate school opportuniti es 
and appl i cati on procedures. 
• Serve as a campus resource A dvi sors assi st students i n obtai ni ng support from other off i ces 
of the University. This includes informing students about possible scholarships or 
f d I owshi ps, and referri ng students to acaderri c support units that provi de tutori ng or 
workshops on study skills, time management, and stress management. They may recommend 
that students seek counsd i ng for stress, addi cti ons, or trauma that may be affecti ng thd r 
acaderri c work. A dvi sors i nf orm students wi th physi cal and I earni ng di sabi I i tj es of the 
support avai I abl e to them They al so encourage students to enri ch thd r experi ences by 
becorri ng i nvol ved on campus viasocial, political, acaderri c, ethni c/cul tural , sport and/or 
recreati onal student organi zati ons and acti vi tj es. 

Some advi sors are abl e to provi de i nf ormati on on al I of the above. Others sped al i ze i n a parti cul ar 
topi c or area of concern. For exampl e, a col I ege/department may have a specif i c career advi sor or 
study abroad coordi nator. Students i n upper I evd courses are often advi sed by faculty members 
who can assist with graduate school and career issues. Furthermore, some advisors work with 
specific populations, such as returning students, athletes, students with physical or learning 
di sabi I i ti es, and students of col or. 

I f you are not sure where to seek advi si ng, contact your acaderri c col I ege. When request] ng to meet 
with an advi sor, specify what topi cs you wi sh to di scuss to ensure that you are di rected to the 
appropri ate i ndi vi dual . A dvi si ng at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and i s normal I y a combi rati on of 

prof essi onal advi sors, I ocated i n many of the col I ege off i ce, and faculty advi sors. PI ease check your 
i ndi vi dual col I ege to f i nd out whom you need to see for acaderri c advi si ng. For more i nf ormati on, 
visit www.advisina.umd.edu . 

Academic Advising and Degree Completion 

A 1 1 new students are requi red to attend Ori entati on where they wi 1 1 regi ster for d asses. Duri ng thd r 
f i rst semester, students devd op a four year pi an based on tempi ates provi ded for each maj or (see 
www. 4yearpl ans. umd.edu ) . Each pi an i nd udes specif i c benchmark courses to be compl eted withi n a 
specif i c peri od of ti me. Four year pi ans must be approved by an advi sor i n order to regi ster for 
subsequent semesters. 

Students are requi red to compl ete the benchmark courses i n the r maj or i n order to progress to 
graduati on (see Student Acaderri c Success- Degree Compl eti on Pol i cy) . Outl i ned i n each four year 
pi an, benchmark courses gui de students i n a step by step process to degree compl eti on and 
demonstrate satisfactory progress i n the major. Academic units conduct regular reviews of students' 
progress, and those students who are i n danger of f al I i ng behi nd benchmarks wi 1 1 be requi red to 
work with an advi sor to devd op a pi an to get back on track. Students who do not make progress may 
be requi red to sd ect a new maj or i n whi ch they can be successful . 

M any students change the r maj ors over the course of the r acaderri c career. When doi ng so, 
students must f i rst compl ete and have approved a new four year pi an. A ny student who compl etes 
ten semesters or 130 credits without compl eti ng a degree i s subj ect to mandatory advi si ng pri or to 
regi strati on for any subsequent semester. Students with excepti onal ci rcumstances or those who are 
enrol I ed i n sped al programs are requi red to devd op a modif i ed graduati on pi an that i s appropri ate to 
the r situati ons. I n al I cases, students are responsi bl e for meeti ng progress expectarj ons arid 
benchmarks requi red for the r degree programs. 

I I i s recommended that al I students seek advi si ng assi stance pri or to course regi strati on. Students 
should also consult with an advisor as ci rcumstances change and four year plans need to be updated. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 3 ^ 85 



M any col I eges have mandatory advi si ng for pri or to regi steri ng for a new semester. 

Students pi aced on probati on are requi red to consult an acaderri c advi sor i n thei r col I ege pri or to the 
begi nni ng of a new semester but no later than the end of the schedule adj ustment period. Students 
wi 1 1 not be al I owed to add or drop courses, or to regi ster duri ng any probati on semester without the 
approval of an acaderri c advi sor i n thei r col I ege. 

Student Academic Success-Degree Completion Policy 

The goal of the Student Acaderri c Success- Degree Compl eti on Pol i cy i s to promote undergraduate 
student success. The pol i cy establ i shes a structured framework and criteri a to gui de al I students to 
compl eti on of an undergraduate degree withi n a reasonabl e peri od of ti me. 

F ul I -ti me degree seeki ng students normal I y are expected to compl ete the undergraduate program i n 
four years. Withi n thi s ti mef rame, al I students are expected to demonstrate conti nui ng progress i n 
thei r maj ors by compl eti ng prerequi site or requi red courses with the appropri ate grades, and by 
compl eti ng other requi rements consi stent with graduati on progress or benchmarks establ i shed by 
their academic units (see 2, below). It is ultimately the responsibility of the student to meet these 
requi rements. To hd p students meet these requi rements the U ni versity wi 1 1 faci I itate student 
progress to degree by provi di ng enhanced student advi si ng through the f ol I owi ng measures: 

1. Acaderri c units wi 1 1 create 4-year graduati on tempi ates that wi 1 1 specify the degree requi rements 
for each maj or and provi de semester- by-semester course schedul e model s that achi eve graduati on 
wi thi n four years. Students wi 1 1 prepare individualized pi ans for compl eti ng thd r degrees i n 
accordance with the academic units' 4-year graduation plans. Students are also encouraged to 
periodical ly update thd r plans with the assistance of thei r academic advisors. 

2. Academic units will establish graduation progress benchmarks for each academic major. These 
wi 1 1 sped f y the credi t and course cri teri a that wi 1 1 indi cate sati sf actory progress to degree. A cademi c 
units wi 1 1 establ i sh schedul es for regul ar peri odi c revi ews of student progress, and students who are 

i n danger of f al I i ng behi nd the program benchmarks wi 1 1 be requi red to consult with an advi sor pri or 
to registration. 

3. Students who do not achi eve the progress expectati ons or benchmarks wi 1 1 be permitted to 

conti nue i n the maj or onl y upon the approval of the dean of thd r col I ege. I f i t becomes necessary for 
students to change majors, they wi 1 1 be given assistance i n identifyi ng and enrol I i ng i n a suitable 
alternative major. 

4. When students change maj ors, they wi 1 1 be requi red to present an acaderri c pi an to the new maj or 
uni t that demonstrates thd r abi I i ty to compl ete thei r degree i n a ti md y manner. 

Whi I e some students wi 1 1 have val i d reasons to take additi onal ti me to degree, any student who 
compl etes 10 semesters or 130 credits (see footnote 1 for credits not counted towards these limits) 
without compl eti ng a degree wi 1 1 requi re mandatory advi si ng i n hi s/her col I ege pri or to regi strati on 
for subsequent semesters. Students with exceptional ci rcumstances, students whose programs 
i nd ude mi nors, doubl e maj ors/degrees, enri chment acti vi ti es or who need to pursue a degree part 
ti me wi 1 1 have on record approved plans with approved program benchmarks. Program benchmarks 
wi 1 1 be devd oped by the student i n consul tati on with and approved by an advi sor. 

Footnote I Degree credi ts i nd ude U ni versi ty of M aryl and credi ts and al I appl i cabl e transfer credi ts 
from other postsecondary institutions. Theequivalent semesters applicable to the enrollment limit 
for transfer credi ts wi 1 1 be deterrri ned by di vi di ng al I transfer credi ts appl i cabl e to the degree by 15. 
However, Advanced Placement (AP) arid I international Baccalaureate (IB) credits, and credits earned 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 3 ^ 86 



for col I ege courses taken whilein hi gh school and pri or to rratri cul ati on at a postsecondary 
i nstituti on, wi 1 1 not count toward thi s semester or credit I i rritati on. Such courses may, however, 
count toward degrees. Summer Sessi on and Wi nterterm wi 1 1 not be i ncl uded i n the semester count. 
Credits earned duri ng Summer Sessi ons or Wi nterterms wi 1 1 be i ncl uded i n the credit count. 

10.27.04 



Registering for Classes 

Off i ce of the Regi strar 

M itchd I B ui I di ng, 301-314-8240 

www.testudo.umd.edu 

To attend cl asses at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and, Col I ege Park, i t i s necessary to process an off i ci al 
regi strati on. Sped f i c regi strati on dates and i nstructi ons are pri nted i n the Regi strati on G ui de and on 
theMyUM website, www.my.umd.edu. 

Newly admitted Students are i nvited, and strongly encouraged, to attend an orientation session (see 
chapter 3 for Ori entati on i nf ormati on) . Advi si ng and course regi strati on are part of the ori entati on 
process. A 1 1 newl y adrri tted students must meet wi th an advi sor pri or to regi strati on. L i kewi se, 
newly admitted freshmen and transfer students are requi red to provide proof of i mmunization for 
measl es, rubd I a, mumps and tetanus/di phtheri a. A ddi ti onal I y, M ary I and I aw requi res resi dence hal I 
students to either provi de proof of vacci rati on agai nst meni ngococcal di sease or seek an exempti on 
from thi s requi remert. 

Registration Process Currently enrol led undergraduate students are i nvited to early registration by 
appoi ntment. Students can regi ster at, or anyti me after, the r assi gned regi strati on appoi ntment date 
and ti me. Regi strati on appoi ntments for the Fal I semester begi n i n A pri I , and appoi ntments for the 
Spri ng semester begi n i n I ate October. Regi strati on can be processed on the M yU M web site 
(my.umd.edu) or i n person. Open registration fol lows early registration, and conti nues up to thef i rst 
day of cl asses. D uri ng thi s ti me, students may process an ori gi nal regi strati on or make schedul e 
adjustments. The scheduleadj ustment period begins on thef irstdayof classes. All registration 
transacti ons, either on-l i ne or i n person, are f i nal unl ess a student processes a cancel I ati on of 
registration. 

Registration information for Summer Term Winter Term Freshmen Connection, and Professional 
Programs may be found at www.oes.umd.edu. 

Schedule Adj ustment and Drop Period 

Schedule Adj ustment The schedul e adj ustment peri od i s the f i rst 10 days of cl asses for the fal I and 
spring semesters, the first 5 days of classes for Summer Sessions I and II, and the first 3 days of 
cl asses for Wi nter Term and 3- week Summer Term sessi ons. Courses may be added, when space i s 
avai I abl e, duri ng the schedul e adj ustment peri od, and wi 1 1 appear on the students permanent record 
along with other courses previously listed. Courses dropped duri ng this period wi 1 1 not appear on the 
students permanent record. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 3 ^ 87 



Compl ete i nf ormati on on schedul e adj ustment and drop peri od for Summer Term, Wi rter Term 
Freshmen Connection, and Professional Programs may be found at www.oes.umd.edu. 

Departments may i dentify courses or secti ons of courses (with the approval of the Off i ce of the 
Seni or V i ce Presi dent for A cademi c Aff ai rs) , whi ch after the f i rst f i ve days of the schedul e 
adj ustment period i n Spri ng and Fal I semesters, shal I requi re faculty or departmental approval for 
students to add. 

• Duri ng the schedul e adj ustment peri od f ul I -ti me undergraduates may drop or add courses, or 
change secti ons or credit I evd without f i nanci al penalty provi ded they remai n f ul I -ti me 
students (registered for 12 or more credits). See www.testudo.umd.edu/soc/drops. html for 

i nf ormati on and penal ti es associ ated with changi ng from f ul I -ti me to part-ti me. 

• Part-ti me undergraduates (fewer than 12 credits) may also add, drop and change sections, as 
wd I as change credit I evd , but they shoul d consult the deadl i ne secti on at 
www.tesrijdo.umd.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.html to avoid incurring additional charges. 

• Gradi ng M ethod (i ncl udi ng pass-fai I ) may be changed only duri ng the schedule adj ustment 
period. 

• I n the case of students who are advised i n the Division of Letters and Sciences when Dean's 
approval i s requi red, the Dean for Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es shal I assume the 
responsi bi I i ti es normal I y dd egated to the Dean. 

After Schedule Adj ustment 

• Courses may not be added without sped al perm' ssi on of the department and the dean of the 
acadeni c unit i n whi ch the student i s enrol I ed. 

• All courses for which the student is enrol led shal I remai n as a part of the students permanent 
record. The student's status shal I be consi dered f ul I -ti me if the number of credit hours enrol I ed 
at thi s ti me i s 12 or more 

• A n off i ci al cl ass I i st for each course bd ng offered i s i ssued to the appropri ate department by 
the Off i ce of the Regi strar. E I ectroni c rosters are provi ded to al I f acul ty wi th emai I accounts. 
Students are not permitted to attend a cl ass if thd r names do not appear on the cl ass I i st. 

I nstructors must report di screpanci es to the Of f i ce of the Regi strar. 

Drop Period 

The drop peri od for undergraduate students wi 1 1 begi n at the cl ose of the schedul e adj ustment peri od 
and term' nate at the end of the tenth week of cl asses for the fal I and spri ng semesters. Consult the 
deadl i ne secti on at www.testudo. umd.edu/Schedul eOf Cl asses, html for dates. 

Duri ng this period a student may drop a maxi mum of four credits. However, if the course carries 
more than four credits, the student may drop the enti re course, or i n the case of a vari abl e credit 
course, reduce the credi 1 1 evd by up to four credi ts. D rops duri ng thi s peri od wi 1 1 be recorded on the 
students permanent record with a notati on of W and wi 1 1 be consi dered to represent a si ngl e 
enrol I ment (one of two possi ble) i n the course. This mark wi 1 1 not be used i n the computation of a 
students cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. 

Credit Hours and Maximum Semester Credits 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons ^ >S Q^ &8 



N o baccal aureate curri cul um requi res fewer than 120 semester hours. The semester hour, whi ch i s 
the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week for one semester. Two or 
three hours of I aboratory or f i d d work are equi val ent to one I ecture or red tati on peri od. 

I n order for undergraduate students to compl ete most curri cul a i n four acaderri c years, the; r 
semester I oad must range from 12 to 19 hours (30 to 36 hours each year) toward the degree. By 
pol i cy, undergraduates may not exceed the f ol I owi ng maxi mum credit I oads without the pri or 
approval of the; r Dean: 

15 week semester: 20 credits i n a 15 week semester ( 16 credits pri or to the f i rst day of cl asses) 

6 Week Summer Term 8 credits 

3 Week Term (Summer or Wi nter): 4 credits 

Cancellation of Registration 

Students who regi ster and I ater deci de not to attend the U ni versi ty must cancel their regi strati on wi th 
the Off i ce of the Regi strar pri or to the off i ci al f i rst day of cl asses. Fai I ure to cancel regi strati on wi 1 1 
result in a financial obligation to the U ni versity of Maryland even though a student does not attend 
class. The University reserves the rightto cancel regi strati on for students who fai I tomeettheir 
financial obligations. 

Concurrent UrcJerg-aduate-Graduate Registration 

A n undergraduate degree seeki ng student at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and may, wi th the approval of 
hi s or her Dean, of the department and the i nstructor off eri ng the course, and of the G raduate School , 
regi ster for graduate courses (600 1 eve! and above) that wi 1 1 be recorded as for graduate credit only 
and that may be appl i ed towards an advanced degree at thi s uni versi ty or d sewhere Students 
digible for this option normally will have achieved J uni or standing, will haveaGPA of atleast3.0, 
and wi 1 1 have successful ly completed the prerequisite courses with a grade of 'B-' or better. The 
student must subrri t a pi an of study that shows that taki ng graduate courses wi 1 1 not undul y dd ay 
completion of requi rements for the bachdor's degree. The total of graduate and undergraduate 
credits attempted i n any semester may not be more than d ghteen. The graduate credits so earned 
wi 1 1 not count towards any of the requi rements for the B accal aureate degree. A maxi mum of twd ve 
credits may be taken for graduate credit by a student whi I e enrol I ed as an undergraduate. 



Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 

Subj ect to requi rements deterrri ned by the graduate faculty of the department or program off eri ng 
the course, undergraduate degree-seeking students may register for graduate- 1 evd courses, i.e., those 
numbered from 600 to 898, with the exception of 799, for undergraduate credit. The student must 
obtai n the pri or approval of the department and i nstructor off eri ng the course. 

Students digible for this option normally will have achieved J uni or standing, will haveaGPA of at 
least 3.0, and wi 1 1 have successful I y completed the prerequisite courses with a grade of 'B-' or better. 

Enrol I mart i n a graduate- 1 evd course does not i n any way i mply subsequent departmental or 
graduate school approval for admission i nto a graduate program nor may the course be used as 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P^ 89 



credi t f or a graduate degree at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and . 

Withdrawal and Leave of Absence 

Students adrri tted to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and are expected to make regul ar and consi stent 
progress towards the compl eti on of thei r degree. H owever, the U ni versi ty understands that i n 
exceptional ci rcumstances a student may f i nd it necessary to completely withdraw from al I classes. 
The University considers such an i interruption to be very serious as it delays normal progress towards 
the degree. Students shoul d not wi thdraw for f ri vol ous reasons or to avoi d the consequences of 
i gnori ng thei r acaderri c responsi bilities. Any student consi deri ng wi thdrawal i s strongl y encouraged 
to meet with his or her academic col lege advisor before leavi ng the U ni versity. 

Potential Implications: Withdrawing or taking a leave of absence from the University may have 
seri ous i mpl i cati ons for i nternati onal students, students recei vi ng f i nanci al ai d or students resi di ng i n 
on-campus housi ng. Students are advi sed to contact the appropri ate off i ces before f i nal i zi ng 
withdrawal or leave of absence plans. 

Student Financial Services Office, 1135 LeeBuilding, 301-314-9000 
Department of ResidentLife, 2100 Annapolis Hall, 301-314-2100 
Office of International Services, 2111 Holzapfd Hall, 301-314-7740 

Withdrawal : A wi thdrawal i s avai I abl e anyfj me between the f i rst and I ast day of cl asses. Students 
must submit written noti ce of withdrawal to the Off i ce of the Regi strar no I ater than the I ast day of 
cl asses. A students return to the U ni versi ty i s conti ngent upon the condi ti ons outl i ned i n Return to 
the University bel ow. 

Leave of Absence: A I eave of absence i s a type of withdrawal and i s avai I abl e for students wi shi ng 
to take time away from the University with the intention of returning the foil owing semester. The 
I eave of absence status i s especi ally hd pful for red pi ents of federal f i nanci al ai d because they are 
not consi dered to be withdrawn provi ded they do return and compl ete the f ol I owi ng semester. 
Students may appl y for a I eave of absence onl y duri ng the I ast 60 days of the semester. A student's 
return to the U ni versi ty i s conti ngent upon the condi ti ons outl i ned i n Return to the University bd ow. 
Return to the University: Normally, a student may withdraw or take a I eave of absence from the 
U ni versi ty onl y once duri ng matri cul ati on as an undergraduate. Students who f i nd i t necessary to 
I eave the University are requi red to petition the Faculty Review Board i n order to return. Students 
who have earned a mi ni mum 2.0 cumulati ve GPA, with no previous withdrawal or leave of absence, 
are exempt from thi s requi remert. Students who withdraw or take a I eave of absence whi I e on 
acaderri c probati on, or those returni ng from di srri ssal , are al ways requi red to petiti on the Faculty 
Revi ew B oard. Students are al so requi red to compl ete a Rei nstatement A dvi si ng M eeti ng wi th thei r 
acaderri c col I ege advi si ng off i ce before the petiti on wi 1 1 be consi dered by the Faculty Revi ew 
Board. 

Additional WithoVawal/Leaveof Absence I n fo r mation:The effective date of withdrawal or leave 
of absence for the purposes of refunds i s the date that the noti ce i s recei ved by the Off i ce of the 
Registrar. Notation of withdrawal/leave of absence and the effective date wi 1 1 be posted to the 
student's acaderri c record. I nstructors and col I ege off i ces wi 1 1 be noti f i ed of al I wi thdrawn students. 
The deadl i ne date for subrritti ng the withdrawal for each semester i s the I ast day of cl asses. Students 
shoul d contact the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Adrri ssi ons for reenrol I ment i nf ormati on. 
The repeat pol i cy wi 1 1 not appl y to courses taken duri ng the acaderri c semester from whi ch the 
student i s off i ci al I y wi thdrawn. 

Military Call-ups: It isthe intent of the University of Maryland, Col I ege Park, to facilitate the 
wi thdrawal or change i n regi strati on and the reenrol I ment of students who are cal I ed to acti ve 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P 8 ^ 90 



nri I itary duty duri ng the semester. The student (or a representative) should take a copy of the rri I itary 
orders to the Office of the Registrar and process a withdrawal or change i n registration papers. 
Detai I ed i nf ormati on about thi s process may be obtai ned from the Offi ce of the Regi strar. 
Withdrawal for active rri I itary service wi 1 1 have no effect on any subsequent request to withdraw 
from the University. 

Courses Taken at Other I restitutions 

Courses taken at another i institution may not be credited toward a degree program without prior 
approval of the dean of the col I ege from whi ch the student expects to earn a degree. E I i gi bl e 
students may enrol I i n courses at other uni versi ti es vi a the U ni versi ty System of M aryl and's 
I nter- 1 nsti tuti onal Regi strati on Program or the Consorrj um of U ni versi ti es of the Washi ngton 
Metropolitan Area. 

Consortium of Universities of the Washi ngton Metropolitan Area: 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area consists of American 
University, The Catholic University of America, Corcoran Col I ege of Art and Design, Gall audet 
University, Georgetown University, George Mason University, The George Washington University, 
Howard University, Marymount University, National Defense Intelligence Col I ege National 
Defense University, Tri nity University, University of the District of Columbia and the University of 
M aryl and Col I ege Park. Students enrol I ed i n degree-seeki ng programs at these i nsti tuti ons are abl e 
to attend certai n cl asses at the other campuses and have the credit consi dered as resi dent credit at 
thei r home i nsti tuti ons. The i ntenti on i s to al I ow students to take an occasi oral course to augment a 
program rather than to devd op an i ndi vi dual program Payment of tui ti on for courses wi 1 1 be made 
to the students home campus however, sped al fees may be assessed by the host i nsti tuti on. 
Comparabl e courses offered at U ni versi ty of M aryl and may not be taken through the Consorrj um 

Currently registered, degree seeking University of Maryland students with at least junior standing 
may parti ci pate i n the Consorrj um program accordi ng to the sti pul ati ons I i sted i n the current editi on 
of the Regi strati on G ui de E nrol I ment i n courses i s avai I abl e onl y on a space-avai I abl e basi s. 
Visiting students are expected to meet prerequi sites or other criteri a set by the host institution and 
comply with the host i nsti tuti on's registration procedures and deadl i nes. 

Gol den I D students are not el i gi bl e to enrol I i n courses through the Consorrj um wi th wai ver of fees. 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and students may onl y enrol I i n courses offered on the campus of the host 
i nsti tuti on. Students i nterested i n additional i nf ormati on about the Consorrj um program shoul d 
revi ew the current edi ti on of the Regi strati on G ui de or contact the Consorrj um Coordi nator on the 
first floor of the Mi tend I Building. 

University System of Maryland I nter-l institutional Registration Program 

Currently registered, degree seeking University of Maryland College Park students have the 
opportuni ty to take courses at certai n U ni versi ty System of M aryl and I nsti tuti ons to augment thd r 
degree program at U ni versi ty of M aryl and under the I nter- 1 nsti tuti oral Regi strati on Program 
The provi si ons for such are contai ned i n the Board of Regents Pol i cy on Student Concurrent 
I nter-l nsrjturj oral Registration (BOR III 2.40;lll 2.41) found at 

http://www. usmd.edu/reaents/ . Parti ci pati ng i nsti tuti ons i ncl ude B owi e State U ni versi ty, Coppi n 
State University, Frostburg State University, Salisbury University, Towson University, University of 
Baltimore, University of Maryland at Baltimore, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 
University of Maryland College Park and University of Maryland Eastern Shore University of 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P^ 91 

M aryl and Col I ege Park students may not enrol I i n courses at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and U ni versi ty 
Col lege through this program Currently registered, degree seeking University of Maryland students 
with at I east sophomore standi ng may enrol I i n courses for credit, and have that credit consi dered as 
resident credit at thei r home i institution. Enrol I ment i n courses is avai lable only on a space avai lable 
basi s and vi siti ng students are expected to meet prerequi sites or other criteri a set by the host 
i nstiturj on. Payment of tuition for courses will be made to the students home campus however 
sped al fees may be assessed by the host i nstiturj on. Students i nterested i n additi onal i nf ormati on 
about the I nter-l nstiturj onal Regi strati on program shoul d revi ew the current editi on of the 
Regi strati on G ui de or contact the Consorti um Coordi nator on the f i rst f I oor of the Mi tchd I 
Building. 

I nter- 1 nsti tuti onal Regi strati on i s onl y appl i cabl e f or the F al I and Spri ng semesters. 
Student I D Numbers 



University of Maryland assigns all students a unique nine-digit university identification number 
(UID).TheUID is the student identifier for most university transactions. Students are also required 
to provide their Social Security Number. Useof theSSN is limited to necessary business 
transacti ons or where use of the SSN i s requi red by I aw. 

See www, presi dent umd.edu/pol i ci es/docs/vi -2600A . pdf f or the U ni versi ty of M aryl and Pol i cy on 
the Col I ecti on, U se and Protecti on of I D N umbers and a I i st of current! y approved uses. 

Useof Email for Official Communication 

The U ni versi ty has adopted emai I as the pri mary means for sendi ng off i ci al communi cati ons to 
students. Academic advisors, faculty, and campus administrative offices use emai I to convey 
i mportant i nf ormati on and ti me-sensi ti ve noti ces. A 1 1 enrol I ed students are provi ded a U ni versi ty 
emai I address. Students are responsi bl e for keepi ng thei r emai I address up to date or for f orwardi ng 
emai I to another address. Fai I ure to check emai I , errors i n f orwardi ng emai I , and returned emai I due 
to mailbox full or user unknown wi 1 1 not excuse a student from mi ssi ng announcements or 
deadlines. 

Change of Address 

Students are expected to notify the Off i ce of the Regi strar of any change i n thei r I ocal , permanent or 

e-mail address. Use the internet to keep address information current and accurate. Change of address 

forms are avai I abl e at the f ol I owi ng pi aces: 

MyUM website www.rry.umd.edu 

Offi ce of the B ursar, Room 1115 or 1135, Lee B ui I di ng 

Student Servi ces Counter, f i rst f I oor, M itchd I B ui I di ng 

PI ease be advi sed that changi ng your permanent address coul d affect your resi dency status for 

tuiti on and bi 1 1 i ng purposes. For further i nf ormati on about these potenti al impli cati ons, pi ease 

contact the Resi dency CI assif i cati on Offi ce at rescl ass@umd.edu. 



I dentification Cards 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P 3 ^ 92 



The photo I D card is issued at the ti me the student first registers for classes. This card is to be used 
for the enti re durati on of enrol I ment. A ddi ti onal I y, students who have food servi ce contracts wi 1 1 use 
thi s photo i denti f i cati on card to access these servi ces. Contact D i ni ng Servi ces di recti y for further 
information. 

The photo I D card can be used by students for adrri ssi on to most athl eti c, soci al , and cultural events, 
to withdraw books from the I i brari es, and as a general form of i denti fi cati on on campus. 

U ni versi ty of M ary I and photo I D cards wi 1 1 be repl aced free of charge onl y when the most recent, 
acti ve I D card i s turned i nto the Off i ce of the Regi strar at the ti me of rei ssue A N D : 

1) the I D bar code is no longer visi ble or readable or 

2) the I D card has become worn and no longer functions properly. 

The repl acement of an I D card wi 1 1 carry a charge of $20 if the student i ndi cates that thei r card i s 
I ost, stol en, or the card has i ntenti onal damage ( i . e hoi es punched i n the card, cards i ntenti onal I y 
snapped i n two, etc. ) . T he Regi strar's Off i ce i s avai I abl e weekdays from 8: 30am to 4: 30pm i n the 
Fi rst Floor Lobby of the M itchd I Bui Idi ng for requesti ng replacement cards. 

Veterans Benefits 

Students attending the university under the Veterans Education Assistance Act (Title 38, U.S. Code) 
may recei ve assi stance and enrol I ment certifi cati on at the V eterans Certi f i cati on Off i ce, i n the Off i ce 
of tine Registrar, 1113 Mitchell Building. Consult the online Schedule of Classes 
at http://www.testudo. umd.edu/soc/vets. html for more i nf ormati on. 

Classification of Students 

Off i ci al cl assif i cati ons of undergraduate students are based on earned credits as f ol I ows: freshman, 
1-29 semester hours; sophomore, 30-59; junior, 60-89; and senior, 90 to at least 120. 



Academic Records and Regulations 

The Office of the Regi strar, located on the first floor of the Mitchell Bui I ding is responsible for 
mai ntai ni ng student records and i ssui ng off i ci al transcri pts. 

Marking System 

The f ol I owi ng symbol s are used on the students permanent record for al I courses i n whi ch the 
student is enrol led after the initial regi srjati on arid scheduleadjustrnent period: A+, A, A-, B+, B, 
B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, XF, I, P, S, W, and A UD. These marks remain as part of the students 
permanent record and may be changed only by the origi nal i nstructor on certification, approved by 
the department chai r and the dean, that an actual mi stake was made i n deterrri ni ng or recordi ng the 
grade. 

• A +, A , A- denotes excel I ent mastery of the subj ect and outstandi ng schol arshi p. I n 
computati ons of cumul ati ve or semester averages, a grade of A + or A wi 1 1 be assi gned a 
val ue of 4.0 qual ity poi nts per credit hour. A grade of A- wi 1 1 be assigned 3.7 qual ity poi nts 
per credit hour. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons ^ >S Q^ 93 



• B+, B, B- denotes good mastery of the subject and good scholarship. A grade of B+is 

assi gned a val ue of 3.3 qual ity poi nts per hour. A grade of B i s assi gned a val ue of 3.0 qual ity 
poi nts per credit hour. A grade of B- is assigned a val ue of 2.7 qual ity poi nts per hour. 

• C+, C, C- denotes acceptable mastery of the subject. A grade of C+ is assigned a value of 2.3 
qual ity poi nts per hour. A grade of C is assigned a val ue of 2.0 poi nts per credit hour. A grade 
of C- i s assi gned a val ue of 1.7 qual ity poi nts per credit hour. 

• D+, D, D- denotes borderl i ne understandi ng of the subject, margi nal performance, and it does 
not represent sati sf actory progress toward a degree. A grade of D + i s assi gned 1. 3 poi nts per 
credit hour. A grade of D is assigned a val ue of 1.0 qual ity poi nt per credit hour. A grade of D- 
is assi gned 0.7 quality points per credit. 

• F denotes f ai I ure to understand the subj ect and unsati sf actory performance. A grade of F i s 
assi gned a val ue of 0.0 qual ity poi nts per credit hour. 

• XF- denotes fail ure due to academic dishonesty. AnXF istreated inthe same way asF for the 
purposes of cumulative agerage. 

• The mark of I is an exceptional mark that is an i nstructor option. It is only given to a student 
whose work has been qual i tati vd y sati sf actory, when, because of i 1 1 ness or other 

ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unabl e to compl ete some smal I 
porti on of the work of the course. I n no case wi 1 1 the mark I be recorded for a student who has 
not complted the maj or porti on of the work of the course. For urther expl anati on see 
"Incompletes" below. 

• The mark of P i s a student opti on mark, equi val ent to a grade of D- or better. Thi s grade i s not 
used i n any computati on of qual i ty poi nts or cumul ati ve average total s at the end of the 
semester. The student must i nf orm the Offi ce of the Regi strar of the sd ecti on of thi s opti on by 
the end of the schedule adjustment period. For a full explanation see "Pass-Fail Policy" bdow. 

• S i s a department opti on mark that may be used to denote sati sf actory performance by a 
student i n progressi ng thesi s proj ects, ori entati on courses, practi ce teachi ng, and the I i ke. In 
computati on of cumul ati ve averages a mark of S wi 1 1 not be i ncl uded. 

• Wis used to i ndi cate withdrawal from a course by end of the schedul e adj ustment peri od. For 
i nf ormati on and compl eteness, the grade of W i s pi aced on the students permanent record by 
the Offi ce of the Regi strar. The i nstructor wi 1 1 be notif i ed that the student has withdrawn from 
the course. This grade is not used i n any computation of qual ity poi nts or cumulative average 
total s at the end of the semester. 

• A U D denotes a student regi steri ng to audit a course or courses whi ch have been desi gnated as 
avail able under the audit opti on and in which space is avail able. The notation AUD will be 

pi aced on the transcri pt for each course audi ted. A notati on to the effect that thi s symbol does 
not i mply attendance or any other effort i n the course wi 1 1 be i ncl uded on the transcri pt i n the 
expl anati on of the gradi ng system 

Additional Record Notations 

I n additi on to the above marks, there are provi si ons for other record or transcri pt notati ons that may 
be used based on university policy and individual circumstances. 

Duplicate courser Used to i ndi cate two courses with the same course content. The second course is 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons ^ >S Q^ 94 

courted i n the cumul ati ve total s unl ess an excepti on i s made by the dean. 

Excluded Credit (Exd Crd)u.- Excluded credit is noted when academic clemency has been granted. 

I incompletes The mark of I is an exceptional mark that is an i nstructor option. It is given only to a 
student whose work i n a course has been qual i tati vd y sati sf actory, when, because of i 1 1 ness or other 
ci rcumstances beyond the students control , he or she has been unabl e to compl ete some smal I 
porti on of the work of the course. I n no case wi 1 1 the mark I be recorded for a student who has not 
compl eted the maj or porti on of the work of the course 

1. Thi s I ncompl ete Contract form must be submitted to the dean of the col I ege offeri ng the course 
withi n six weeks after the grade submission deadl i ne (if a grade hasn't al ready been submitted). If 
any I ncompl ete Contract isnt completed withi n the six week period, the i nstructor wi 1 1 convert the I 
to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 remove the I by compl eti ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; it i s the students 
responsi bility to request arrangements for the compl eti on of the work. The work must be compl eted 
by the time stipulated in the contract, usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event, no 

I ater than one year. I f the remai ni ng work for the course as def i ned by the contract i s not compl eted 
on schedul e, the i nstructor wi 1 1 convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract. 

3. Excepti ons to the stated deadl i ne may be granted by the student's dean (i n negoti ati on with the 
faculty member or the faculty members dean) upon the written request of the student if 

ci rcumstances warrant further del ay. 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the department chai r, upon request of the student wi 1 1 make 

appropri ate arrangements for the student to compl ete the course requi rements. 

5. 1 1 i s the responsi bility of tine i nstructor or department chai r concerned to subrri t the grade 

prompt! y upon compl eti on of the condi ti ons of the I ncompl ete Contract. 

6. The I cannot be removed through re- regi strati on for the course or through credit by 

examination. An I mark is not used in the computation of quality points or cumulative grade point 

averages. 

Non-appl icable (Non-Appl ): I n al I cases of transfer from one col I ege to another at the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park, the dean of the recei vi ng col I ege, wi th the approval of the student, shal I 
i ndi cate whi ch courses, if any, i n the students previ ous academi c program are not appl i cabl e to hi s or 
her new program, and shal I notify the Off i ce of the Regi strar of the adj ustments that are to be made 
i n determi ni ng the students progress toward a degree. Del eti ons may occur both i n credits attempted 
and correspondi ngly i n credits earned. This eval uation shal I be made upon the students i nitial entry 
i nto a new program not thereafter. I f a student transfers from one program to another, hi s or her 
record eval uati on shal I be made by the dean i n the same way as if he or she were transferri ng 
col I eges. I f the student subsequent! y transfers to a thi rd col I ege, the dean of the thi rd col I ege shal I 
make a si nri I ar i ni ti al adj ustment; courses marked non-appl i cabl e by the second dean may become 
appl i cabl e i n the thi rd program 

Pass-Fail Policy 

Pass-Fail Policy: The f ol I owi ng Pass-Fai I policy was approved by the Board of Regents for 
i mpl ementati on begi nni ng with the Spri ng 1989 semester: 

1. To regi ster for a course under the pass-f ai I opti on, an undergraduate must have compl eted 30 or 
more credit hours of col lege credit with a GPA of at least 2.0. At least 15 of these credit hours must 
have been completed at the University of Maryland, College Park with a University of Maryland 
GPA of at least 2.0. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons ^ >S Q^ 95 



2. Courses for whi ch thi s opti on appl i es must be d ecti ves i n the student's program The courses may 
not be col lege, major, field of concentration, or general education program requi rements. 

3. Onl y one course per semester may be regi stered for under the pass-f ai I opti on. 

4. N o more than 12 semester hours of credi t may be taken under the pass-f ai I opti on duri ng a 
students col I ege career. 

5. Students may not choose thi s opti on when re- regi steri ng for a course. 

6. When registering under the pass-fail option, a course that is passed will count as hours in the 
students record but wi 1 1 not be computed i n the grade poi nt average. A course that i s f ai I ed wi 1 1 
appear on the students record and wi 1 1 be computed both i n the overal I average and the semester 
average. 

7. Students regi steri ng for a course under the pass-f ai I opti on are requi red to compl ete al I regul ar 
course requi rements. Thei r work wi 1 1 be eval uated by the i nstructor by the normal procedure for 
letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. Thegrades A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, 
C-, D +, D or D- wi 1 1 automati cal I y be converted by the Off i ce of the Regi strar to the grade P on the 
students permanent record. The grade F wi 1 1 remai n as given. The choice of gradi ng option may be 
changed onl y duri ng the schedul e adj ustment peri od for courses i n whi ch the student i s currenti y 
registered. 

incompletes 

The mark of 'I ' i s an excepti onal mark that i s an i nstructor opti on. 1 1 i s gi ven onl y to a student whose 
work i n a course has been qual i tati vd y sati sf actory, when, because of i 1 1 ness or other ci rcumstances 
beyond the students control , he or she has been unabl e to compl ete some smal I porti on of the work 
of the course. I n no case will the mark I be recorded for a student who has not compl eted the 
maj or porti on of the work of the course 

1. Thi s I ncompl ete Contract form must be submitted to the dean of the col I ege offeri ng the course 
wi thi n si x weeks after the grade subrri ssi on deadl i ne ( i f a grade hasn't al ready been subrri tted) . I f 
any I ncompl ete Contract isnt completed withi n the six week period, the i nstructor wi 1 1 convert the 
I to the appropri ate grade. 

2. The student wi 1 1 remove the 'I ' by compl eti ng work assi gned by the i nstructor; it i s the students 
responsi bility to request arrangements for the compl eti on of the work. The work must be compl eted 
by the time stipulated in the contract, usually by the end of the next semester, but in any event, no 

I ater than one year. I f the remai ni ng work for the course as def i ned by the contract i s not compl eted 
on schedul e, the i nstructor wi 1 1 convert the I to the grade i ndi cated by the contract. 

3. Excepti ons to the stated deadl i ne may be granted by the student's dean (i n negoti ati on with the 
faculty member or the faculty members dean) upon the written request of the student if 

ci rcumstances warrant further dd ay. 

4. 1 f the i nstructor i s unavai I abl e, the department chai r, upon request of the student wi 1 1 make 

appropri ate arrangements for the student to compl ete the course requi rements. 

5. 1 1 i s the responsi bility of tine i nstructor or department chai r concerned to subrri t the grade 

promptj y upon compl eti on of the condi ti ons of the I ncompl ete Contract. 

6. The 'I ' cannot be removed through re- regi strati on for the course or through credit by 

exarri nation. An 'I ' mark is not used i n the computation of quality poi nts or cumulative grade poi nt 

averages. 

Computation of Grade Point Average 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 3 ^ 96 



G PA i s computed by di vi di ng the total number of qual i ty poi nts accumul ated i n courses for whi ch a 
grade of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, orXF has been assigned by the total 
number of credits attempted i n those courses. Courses for which a mark of P, S, I , NGR or W has 
been assi gned are not i ncl uded i n computi ng the G PA . Each I etter grade has a numeri cal val ue 
A+=4, A =4, A- =3.7; B+=3.3, B=3, B- =2.7; C+=2.3, C=2, C- =1.7; D+=1.3, D=l, D- =0.7; F = 

0. Multi plyi ng this val ue by the number of credits for a particular course gives the number of qual ity 
poi nts earned for that course. 

See Repeat Policy to determine the effect of repeated courses in the calculation of GPA. 

Repeat Policy 

The f ol I owi ng Campus Repeat Pol i cy appl i es to A L L courses that may not be repeated for additi onal 
credit. 

1. The f ol I owi ng students are requi red to f ol I ow the new repeat poi i cy: 

a. All new freshmen who began at University of Maryland, Col lege Park Fall 1990and 
after. 

b. Transfer students from school s other than M aryl and community col I eges who began 
at University of Maryland, College Park, Fall 1990 and after. This includes transfer 
students from another U ni versi ty of M ary I and institution. 

2. There i s a I i rrit to the number of ti mes a student may repeat a course. Students may have one 
repeat of any course in which they earned an A +, A, A -, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, P, S, 
W, NGR or Audit; they cannot be registered (after the schedule adj ustment period) for any given 
course more than twi ce. A students deans off i ce may grant an excepti on al I owi ng an additi onal 
course repeat. I n thi s case, students must present a pi an for successful I y compl eti ng the course. A 1 1 
attemptBw'// be counted toward the total I i rrit for repeatabl e credits. 

/Voter Students may not choose the Pass-Fail option when re-registering for a course or re-register 
for a course in which a grade of I has been noted. 

3. Students may repeat no more than 18 credi ts. A ddi ti onal I y, i f a student wi thdraws from all 
courses duri ng a semester, those courses are not i ncl uded i n thi s I i rri t 

4. The grade poi nt average wi 1 1 i ncl ude al I attempts at a given course that result i n a grade of A +, A, 
A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, or F. However, to help freshmen and transfer students adjust to 
the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, the f ol I owi ng two excepti ons al I ow for the cumul ati ve 

G PA to be cal cul ated so that onl y the hi gher grade i s i ncl uded: 

a. When the repeated course was taken withi n the students f i rst semester at U ni versity of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park, or 

b. When the repeated course was taken withi n the students f i rst 24 credit hours 
attempted (i ncl udi ng transfer credits) or withi n the semester duri ng whi ch the student 
reached the 24th credit hour attempted. Advanced Placement Exam credits do not count 
toward the 24 credit count. 

5. A ny grade earned i n pri or attempts of a repeated course wi 1 1 appear on the students transcri pt, 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons ^ >S Q^ 97 



regard ess of whether the grade i s dropped f rorn or i ncl uded i n, the cumul ati ve grade poi rt 
average. 

6. Repeat by transfer: I f a student repeats by transfer a course that was taken before or duri ng the 
semester i n whi ch the student reached 24 credits attempted ( i ncl udi ng transfer credits) and the 
transfer grade i s hi gher, then the ori gi nal grade i n the course wi 1 1 be excl uded from the G PA 
calculation. 

a. I f the course was taken after the semester i n whi ch the student reached 24 credits attempted, the 
ori gi nal grade remai ns i n the G PA cal cul ati on. 

Repeat Policy Prior to Fall 199ft 

The f ol I owi ng students f ol I ow the/xewousjepeat pol i cy : 

• Students who began at University of Maryland, College Park, before the Fall 1990 semester 
( i ncl udi ng students who enter U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park for summer 1990) . 

• Transfer students who began at a M aryl and community col I ege before Fal I 1990. 

• U M B C Col I ege of E ngi neeri ng students who began before 1990. 

The hi ghest grade recei ved i n the repeated course i s used to cal cul ate the G PA . A student may repeat 
any course; however no student may be regi stered for a course more than three ti mes. 
If a student repeats a course i n which he or she has al ready earned a mark of A, B, C, D, P, or S, the 
subsequent attempt shal I not i ncrease the total hours earned toward the degree. Onl y the hi ghest 
mark wi 1 1 be used i n computati on of the students cumul ati ve average. U nder unusual ci rcumstances, 
the students dean may grant an excepti on to thi s pol i cy . 



Academic Clemency Policy 

U ndergraduate students who return to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park i n pursui t of thei r 
i ni ti al baccal aureate degree after a separati on of f i ve cal endar years, may peti ti on the appropri ate 
dean to have a number of previ ousl y earned grades and credi ts removed from the cal cul ati on of thei r 
cumul ati ve grade poi nt average. U p to 16 credi ts and correspondi ng grades from courses previ ousl y 
compl eted at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, wi 1 1 be removed from cal cul ati on of the 
grade poi nt average and wi 1 1 not be counted toward graduati on requi rements. The petiti on for 
clemency must be filed in the first semester of return to the institution. Approval is neither automatic 
nor guaranteed. 

Honors (Dean's List) 

Semester Academic Honors (Dean's List) are awarded to students who - withi n any given semester 
(excl udi ng wi nter and summer terms) - complete 12 or more credits with a semester G PA of 3.5 or 
higher. This recognition is noted on the students academic record. 

PI ease N ote Courses wi th grades of P and S are excl uded from the cal cuati on. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

Consi stent wi th the U ni versi ty of M aryl and Student A cademi c Success - Degree Compl eti on Pol i cy, 
i t i s the i ntent of the U ni versi ty that i ts students make sati sf actory progress toward thei r degree 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 3 ^ 98 



objectives, and achieve academic success. If a student has special ci rcumstances that make it 
i mpossi bl e to compl ete a normal course I oad, the student must meet with an advi sor to di scuss the 
ci rcumstances, the students pi ans for conti nued progress toward a degree, and the i mpl i cati ons for 
conti nued enrol I mart. 

The f ol I owi ng gui del i nes for retenti on of students refer separate! y to semester ( Fal I and Spri ng) and 
Wi nter or Summer terms: 

a. Academic retention is based solely on grade poi nt average (GPA). A rri ni mum of 120 
successful I y completed course credits is requi red for graduation i n any degree curricul um 

I ndi vi dual col I eges, school s, and departments may establ i sh hi gher requi rements for graduati on. 
Students must consult the appropri ate col I ege, school , or department for specif i c i nf ormati on. 

b. Sati sf actory Performance i s def i ned as the achi evement of a cumul ati ve G PA of 2. or above 
Students whose semester G PA f al I s bd ow 2. are encouraged to meet wi th thei r advi sors regardi ng 
the devd opment of a pi an that wi 1 1 appropri atd y respond to the students academi c difficulties and 

I ead to academi c i mprovement. I ndi vi dual col I eges, school s and departments may establ i sh separate 
requi rements for mandatory advi si ng. Students must consult the appropri ate col I ege, school , or 
department for specif i c i nf ormati on. 

c. U nsati sf actory Performance i s def i ned as the achi evement of a cumul ati ve G PA of I ess than 2. 0. 
Students wi 1 1 be pi aced on A cademi c Probati on f ol I owi ng any semester i n whi ch a 2. cumul ati ve 
GPA is not achieved. Normally, students will be Academically Dismissed if they are unableto raise 
thei r cumulative GPA to 2.0 or higher at the end of thd r probationary semester. 

Academic Probation: 

Students wi 1 1 be placed on academic probation if thd r cumulative GPA fal Is bdow 2.0. Normal ly, 
student i s expected to attai n a 2. cumul ati ve G PA at the end of any probati onary semester. Students 
who fail to achi eve a 2.0 cumulative GPA attheendof thd r probati onary semester may be 
academically dismissed, depending on thd r credit I evd as detailed bdow. 

1. Students who have earned 60 credits or more will be dismissed from the University in the event 
thd r cumul ati ve G PA remai ns bd ow 2. at the end of thd r probati onary semester. Students who are 
on probation and attain a cumul ativeGPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be 
subj ect to di srri ssal i n the subsequent semester. 

2. Students who are on academi c probati on and have earned fewer than 60 credits wi 1 1 be permitted 
to conti nue on academic probation if a rri ni mum semester GPA of 2.0 is achieved i n each semester 
of probation. 

a. F ul I -ti me students must compl ete 9 or more credi ts i n each semester of probati on. A 
completed credit is def i ned as credit for any course i n which a student reed ves a grade 
of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-. F, P, or S. 

b. Students who meet thi s requi rement wi 1 1 be permitted to conti nue on probati on unti I 
the cl ose of the semester (exel udi ng wi nter and summer terms) i n whi ch they attai n a 
cumul ativeGPA of 2.0. 

c. H owever, students who are on probati on wi 1 1 be di srri ssed i f they have not achi eved a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of the semester in which they complete 60 credits. 

d. Students who are on probation and attai n a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons ^ >S Q^ 99 



wi rter or summer term wi 1 1 not be subj ect to di srri ssal i n the subsequent semester. 

3. The Off i ce of the Regi strar wi 1 1 notify students when they are pi aced on acaderri c probati on. Such 
notices wi 1 1 i ncl ude a requi remert that the students consult an academic advisor i n thei r col leges 
early i n the probationary semester and i n no event later than the begi nni ng of the early registration 
peri od for the next semester. The Off i ce of the Regi strar wi 1 1 notify the col I eges of students who are 
pi aced on acaderri c probati on and wi 1 1 note the acaderri c probati onary status on the students 
academic record. 

a. The acaderri c advi sors will assist students i n devd opi ng appropri ate pi ans for 
achi evi ng sati sf actory acaderri c performance. 

b. Students who are pi aced on probati on wi 1 1 not be al I owed to add or drop courses, or 
regi ster without the approval of an acaderri c advi sor i n thei r col I ege. 

Academic Dismissal: 

1. Students who have earned 60 or more credits wi 1 1 be dismissed if thei r cumulative GPA remai ns 
below 2.0 for two consecutive semesters (excl udi ng wi nter and summer terms). Students who attai n 
a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in tine preceding winter or summer term will not be subj ect to dismissal. 

2. Students who have earned fewer than 60 credi ts will be di srri ssed f ol I owi ng any probati onary 
semester in which they fail to attain a minimum 2.0 semester GPA and complete the requi site credits 
detai I ed under A cademi c Probati on. Students who attai n a cumul ati ve G PA of 2. i n the precedi ng 
wi nter or summer term wi 1 1 not be subj ect to di srri ssal . 

3. Students who have been acaderri cal I y di srri ssed and who are rei nstated wi 1 1 be acaderri cal I y 
dismissed again if a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is not achieved by the end of the first semester 
after rei nstatement. Rei nstated students wi 1 1 not be al I owed to add or drop courses, or to regi ster 
duri ng any semester without the approval of an acaderri c advi sor i n thei r col I ege, unl ess a 
cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is achieved. 

4. The Office of the Regi strar will notify the appropri ate University off ices when students are 
acaderri cal I y di srri ssed and wi 1 1 note the di srri ssal on the students acaderri c record. 

5. The Student Success Off i ce wi 1 1 notify students i n writi ng when they are di srri ssed. The noti ces 
wi 1 1 i ncl ude a statement that regi strati on for the next semester (excl udi ng wi nter or summer terms) 
will be canceled. 

6. N ormal I y, a student di srri ssed for acaderri c reasons must wai t out one semester (f al I or spri ng) 
before rei nstatement. Excepti ons wi 1 1 be deterrri ned by the Faculty Petiti on Board. 

Application for Academic Reinstatement 

1. Students who have been dismissed may apply to the Faculty Petition Board for rei nstatement on 
the grounds of rriti gati ng ci rcumstances, such as ( i ) demonstrated progress toward a degree by 
successful compl eti on of 24 degree-appl i cabl e credi ts i n the precedi ng year, ( i i ) conti nui ng 

i mprovement i n the cumul ati ve grade poi nt average, and ( i i i ) progress i n general educati on and 
maj or requi rements. 

2. The appl i cati on for rei nstatement must i ncl ude a written statement expl ai ni ng the ci rcumstances 

I eadi ng to di srri ssal and a proposed pi an to remedy those ci rcumstances. Students are encouraged to 
consult with thei r acaderri c advi sors pri or to subrritti ng thei r appl i cati ons to the Faculty Petiti on 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons f" 80 ^ 100 



Board. 

3. A ppl i cati ons for rei nstatement can be compl eted at 

http://www.admi ssions.umd.edu/apply/rei nstatementWebappI i cation, cfm 

Faculty Petition Board: 

1. The Student Success Off i ce i s responsi bl e for subrritti ng the rei nstatement appl i cati ons for revi ew 
and decision by the Faculty Petition Board, which is comprised of tenured faculty appoi nted by the 
Seni or V i ce Presi dent for Acaderri c Affai rs and Provost. The Board i s the sol e arbiter of 

rei nstatement appl i cati ons. 

2. The Faculty Petition Board has the discretion to establ ish the terms for rei nstatement, i ncl udi ng 
the requi rements for achi evi ng acaderri c i mprovement and devd opi ng an acaderri c pi an for success. 

3. The Student Success Off i ce wi 1 1 forward the Boards deci si on to students at the; r permanent 
addresses. 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students 

The university reserves the right to request at any ti me the withdrawal of a student who cannot or 
does not mai ntai n the requi red standard of schol arshi p, or whose conti nuance i n the uni versi ty woul d 
be detri mental to hi s or her health, or the health of others, or whose conduct i s not sati sfactory to the 
authori ti es of the uni versi ty . A ddi ti onal i nf ormati on about the di srri ssal of del i nquent students may 
be found i n the Code of Student Conduct. 

Attendance and Assessment/Exami nations 

Attendance 

Medically Necessitated Absences from Class 

1. The university expects each student to take full responsibility for his or her academic work and 
acaderri c progress. The student, to progress sati sf actori I y, must meet al I of the requi rements of 
each course for whi ch he or she i s regi stered. Students are expected to attend cl asses regul arl y, 
for consi stent attendance offers the most eff ecti ve opportuni ty open to al I students to gai n 
command of the concepts and materi al s of thei r courses of study. Except as provi ded bd ow, 
absences wi 1 1 not be used i n the computati on of grades, and the recordi ng of student absences 
wi 1 1 not be requi red of the faculty. 

2. It is the policy of the university to excuse the absences of students that result from the 

f ol I owi ng causes: i 1 1 ness of the student, or i 1 1 ness of a dependent as def i ned by Board of 
Regents pol i cy on f ami I y and medi cal I eave; rd i gi ous observance (where the nature of the 
observance prevents the student from bd ng present duri ng the cl ass peri od); parti ci pati on i n 
uni versi ty acti vi ti es at the request of uni versi ty authori ti es; and compd I i ng ci rcumstance 
beyond the students control . Students clai rri ng excused absence must apply i n writi ng and 
f urni sh documentary support for thd r asserti on that absence resulted from one of these causes. 

3. 1 n some courses, attendance and i n-cl ass parti ci pati on are ongoi ng requi rements and an 
i ntegral part of the work of the course. I n other courses, occasi onal i n-cl ass assessments may 
occur, someti mes without advance noti ce. 1 1 i s the responsi bi I ity of the i nstructor to i nf orm 
each class at the begi nni ng of the semester of the nature of i n-cl ass parti ci pati on expected and 
the effect of absences on the eval uati on of the students work i n the course 

4. A bsences i n courses where i n-cl ass parti ci pati on i s a si gnif i cant part of the work of the course 
shal I be handl ed by the i nstructor i n the course i n accordance with the general pol i cy of hi s or 
her academic unit. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P 80 ^ 101 



5. Permanent changes i n the schedul ingor I ocati on of cl asses must be approved by the chai r, the 
di rector or the dean of the department, non-departmental i zed school or col I ege, as appropri ate. 

6. The U ni versity shal I excuse class absences that result from a students i 1 1 ness, provided the 
student compl i es with the procedures bel ow. Procedures vary dependi ng on the I ength and 
frequency of the absence and whether the absence occurs duri ng a M aj or Schedul ed G radi ng 
Event. 

7. Major Scheduled Gracing Events and Prolonged Absences I nstructors shal I identify i n 
writi ng al I M aj or Schedul ed G radi ng Events pertai ni ng to each course at the begi nni ng of the 
semester. Students who mi ss a M aj or Schedul ed G radi ng Event due to i 1 1 ness or who have a 
prol onged absence due to i 1 1 ness ( mul ti pi e consecurj ve absences due to the same i 1 1 ness) shal I 
be requi red to provi de hi s or her i nstructor with written documentati on of the i 1 1 ness from the 
University Health Center or from his or her own health care provider. The University Health 
Center or health care provi der shal I verify dates of treatment and i ndi cate the dates the student 
was unabl e to meet acaderri c responsi bi I i ti es. 

8. Excused Absences from Class. Except duri ng a M ajor Scheduled Gradi ng Event, students may 
be excused from asinglel ecture, recitati on or I aboratory sessi on one ti me per course per 
semester for a medically necessitated reason. The student should make a reasonable attempt to 
inform the instructor of his/her illness prior to thed ass, and present his or her instructor with a 
self-si gned note attesti ng to the date of hi s or her i 1 1 ness. Thi s note must i ncl ude an 
acknowl edgement: (a) that the i nf ormati on provi ded i s true and correct, and ( b) that the 
student understands that provi di ng f al se i nf ormati on to U ni versi ty off i ci al s i s a vi ol ati on of 
Part 9(h) of the Code of Student Conduct. 

9. Written Absence Policies. Students who have more than one non-consecutive medically 
necessitated absence should comply with the requi rements of the written absence pol icy 
appl i cabl e to each cl ass. I nstructors shal I adopt a wri tten pol i cy addressi ng non-consecuti ve 
student absences for medi cal I y necessi tated reasons at the begi nni ng of each semester. 

I nstructors shoul d specify the nature of i nf ormati on and the documentati on they requi re from 
students. 
10. Resol uti on of Probl ems. A student who wi shes to contest a deci si on by the i nstructor shoul d 
consult with the i nstructor's Department Chai r and the Dean's Office of the Col lege as 
necessary. 



http: //www, presi dent umd.edu/pol i ci es/docs/V - 100G , pdf 



Assessment 

1. The university provides students with excused absences the opportunity to reschedule significant 
assessments, except i n cases where the nature of the assessment precl uded the possi bility of 
reschedul i ng, OR to perform a substitute assignment without penalty. An i nstructor is not under 
obi i gati on to offer a substi tute assi gnment or to gi ve a student a make- up assessment unl ess the 
f ai I ure to perform was due to an excused absence, that i s, due to i 1 1 ness (of the student or a 
dependent), rd i gi ous observance (where the nature of the observance prevents the student from 
being present during the class period), participation in university activities at the request of 
uni versi ty authori ti es, or compel I i ng ci rcumstances beyond the students control . Students cl ai rri ng 
excused absence must appl y i n wri ti ng and f urni sh documentary support for thei r asserti on that 
absence resulted from one of these causes. 

The make-up assessment or substitute assignment must be at a time and place mutually agreeableto 
the i nstructor and student, cover onl y the materi al for whi ch the student was ori gi nal I y responsi bl e, 
and be at a comparabl e I evd of diff i culty with the ori gi nal assessment. I n the event that a group of 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ 102 



students requi res the same make-up assessment or substitute assi gnment, one ti me and pi ace may be 

schedul ed. The make-up assessment or substitute assi gnment must not i interfere with the students 

regul arl y schedul ed cl asses or i n-cl ass f i nal exarri nati on. 

Students who have a concern regardi ng rdigi ous observances shoul d see thei r i nstructors at the start 

of the semester. Although the university attempts to accommodate the religious beliefs of all of its 

members, it fundi ons withi n a secul ar envi ronment and is limited inthe extent to whi ch it can 

i interrupt its normal operati ons. The presi dent shal I deterrri ne when it i s appropri ate for the campus 

community to restri ct reschedul i ng exarri nati ons or other si gnif i cant assessments on the dates of 

rd i gi ous observance. 

At thi s ti me, exarri nati ons or other si gnif i cant assessments may not be schedul ed on Rosh 

H oshanah, Y om K i ppur, Good F ri day, or the f i rst two days of Passover. 

I n cases of di spute, the student may appeal to the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, 
iioi>departmental i zed school or col I ege off eri ng the course wi thi n one week from the date of the 
refusal to schedul e a make-up assessment. I n those i nstances where the i instructor i s the chai r, 
di rector or dean, the appeal shal I be made to the next hi gher adrri ni strati ve off i cer, whose deci si on 
shall be final. 

2. The student must notify hi s or her i instructor of the reason for absence as soon as possi bl e. Where 
the reason for absence from a schedul ed assessment i s known wd I i n advance (for exampl e, i n cases 
of rd i gi ous observance or parti ci pati on i n uni versi ty acti vi ti es at the request of uni versi ty 
authoriti es), the student must i inform the i instructor by the end of the schedul e adj ustment peri od. 

Pri or noti f i cati on i s especi al I y i mportant i n connecti on wi tin f i nal exarri nati ons, si nee f ai I ure to 
reschedul e a f i nal exarri nati on before cond usi on of the f i nal exarri nati on peri od may result i n I oss 
of credits duri ng the semester. Where the reason i s not known wd I i n advance (for exampl e, i n cases 
of i 1 1 ness or compd I i ng ci rcumstances beyond the students control ), the student must i nf orm the 
i instructor as soon as the reason devd ops, or as soon as possi bl e after its devd opment. 

3. Ordi nari ly, assessments are given duri ng class hours i n accordance with the regularly scheduled 
(or off i ci al I y arranged) ti me and pi ace of each course. N o I ess than seven cal endar days noti ce shal I 
be given for assessments scheduled at other times and pi aces. 1 1 shal I be the instructors responsibility 
to ensure that the change i n schedul e does not i nterf ere wi tin any students regul arl y schedul ed cl asses 
or i n-cl ass f i nal exarri nati ons. 1 1 i s the responsi bi I ity of the student to be i informed concerni ng the 
dates of announced qui zzes, tests, and exarri nati ons. Performance assessments may take a vari ety of 
forms and need not be classroom- based written exarri nations. 

4. A f i nal exarri nation shal I be given i n every undergraduate course. Exceptions may be made with 
the written approval of the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, riorvdepartmental ized 
school or col lege, as appropriate. However, a students f i nal course grade shal I be based on a 
combi nati on assessments that is at I east the equivalent of a comprehensive final examination. No 

f i nal exarri nation or equivalent may be given or due duri ng the last week of classes. AIM n-cl ass 
f i nal exarri nations must be hdd on the date and at tineti me listed i n the official f i nal exarri nation 
schedul e. Out-of-d ass f i nal exarri nati on or equi val ent assessments shal I be due on the date and at a 
ti me listed i n the official f i nal exarri nation schedule. 

5. A student may seek to reschedulef i nal exarri nations so that he or she has no more than three (3) 
exarri nations on any given day. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the rescheduling or 
be responsi bl e for taki ng the exarri nati on as ori gi nal I y schedul ed. When reschedul i ng i s desi red, the 
student shoul d f i rst contact hi s or her cl ass i nstructor(s) . A student who encounters diff i culty 
reschedul i ng exarri nations with his or her i nstructors is advised to contact his or her respective 
Dean's Office. Faculty are expected to accommodate students with legiti mate reschedul i ng requests. 

6. The chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, riorvdepartmental i zed school or col I ege, as 
appropri ate, i s responsi bl e for the adequate adrri ni strati on of assessments i n courses under hi s or her 
jurisdiction. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ 103 



7. No in-class assessment shall exceed the allotted time for a regularly scheduled class period. Inthe 
case of i n-cl ass f i nal exarri nati ons, the ti me al I otted shal I not exceed the schedul ed f i nal 
examination period. 

8. Each student shal I be gi ven the i nstructi ons and performance requi rements for al I assessments 

i ntended to requi re more than one- half cl ass peri od i n a form transl atabl e to hard copy, unl ess the 
chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, non-departmental i zed school or col I ege, as 
appropriate, has authorized another procedure. The i nstructi ons and requi rements of the assessment 
shal I be archi ved i n an appropri ate medi um i n a sui tabl e pi ace. 

9. The f ol I owi ng rul es shal I govern al I i n-cl ass exarri nati ons, unl ess the i nstructor for a specif i c 
course sti pul ates alternate rul es for that course. A breach of any of the rul es shal I constitute 

di srupti on of cl ass, a di sci pi i nary offense (Code of Student Conduct, secti on 9. m. ) , or may serve as 
the basi s of an al I egati on of acaderri c di shonesty . 

a. Students arri vi ng I ate for an exarri nati on may not unreasonabl y di srupt the 
examination room 

b. Students must leave all unauthorized materials (e.g., books, notes, calculators) with 
the proctor before bei ng seated. 

c. Where seati ng arrangements are establ i shed by proctors, student must conform to 
these arrangements. 

d. Students may not return to an exarri nati on room after I eavi ng, unl ess perrri ssi on to do 
so has been granted by the proctor pri or to the students departure 

e. Students must cease conversati on pri or to the passi ng out of exarri nati on papers and 
mai ntai n si lence duri ng the enti re exarri nation period. 

f . Students must pi ace exarri nati on papers face down on the writi ng desk unti I the 
exarri nati on i s off i ci al I y begun by the proctor. 

g. Students must keep exarri nati on papers f I at on the writi ng desk at al I ti mes. 

h. Students at an exarri nati on must be prepared to show current U ni versi ty 
identification. 

10. Each faculty member i s to retai n, for one f ul I semester after a course i s ended, the students 
f i nal assessments i n the appropri ate medi um I f a faculty member goes on I eave for a semester or 

I onger, or I eaves the uni versi ty, the f i nal assessments and grade records for the course must be I eft 
with the chai r, the di rector or the dean of the department, non-departmental i zed school or col lege, as 
appropriate. 

Statement on Classroom Climate 

The Uni versity of M aryland val ues the diversity of its student body and is committed to providi ng a 
cl assroom atmosphere that encourages the equitabl e parti ci pati on of al I students. Patterns of 
i nteracti on i n the cl assroom between the faculty member and students and among the students 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ 104 



themsd ves may i nadvertertl y communi cate preconcepti ons about student abilities based on age, 
disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation. These patterns are 
due i n part to the di ff erences the students themsd ves bri ng to the cl assroom C I assroom i nstructors 
shoul d be parti cul arl y sensi ti ve to bei ng equi tabl e i n the opportuni ti es they provi de students to 
answer questions in class, to contribute their own ideas, and to participate fully in projects in and 
outsi de of the cl assroom. 

Of equal i mportance to equity i n the cl assroom i s the need to attend to potenti al deval uati on of 
students that can occur by reference to demeani ng stereotypes of any group and/or overl ooki ng the 
contri buti ons of a parti cul ar group to the topi c under di scussi on. J oki ng at the expense of any group 
creates an i nhospitabl e envi ronmert and i s i nappropri ate. M oreover, i n provi di ng eval uati ons of 
students, i t i s essenti al that i nstructors avoi d di storti ng these eval uati ons wi th preconcei ved 
expectati ons about the i ntd I ectual capaciti es of any group. 

1 1 i s the responsi bility of individual faculty members to revi ew the r cl assroom behavi ors, and those 
of any teachi ng assi starts they supervi se, to ensure that students are treated equi tabl y and not 
di scouraged or deval ued based on thei r differences. Resources for self -eval uati on and trai ni ng for 
faculty members on cl assroom cl i mate and i nteracti on patterns are avai I abl e from the Off i ce of 
Human Relations. 

Transfer Credit 

For current University of Maryland, College Park students 

The Off i ce of the Regi strar posts al I transfer credit that woul d be acceptabl e to any of the degree 
programs atthe University of Maryland, College Park. The dean of the col lege in which the student 
i s enrol I ed determi nes whi ch transfer credits are appl i cabl e to the students degree program I n 
general , credit from acaderri c courses taken at instituti ons of hi gher educati on accredited by a 
regi onal accrediti ng associ ati on wi 1 1 transfer, provi ded that the course i s compl eted with at I east a 
grade of C- and the course i s si rri I ar i n content and I evd to work offered at Col I ege Park. The titl e 
of courses accepted for transfer credit wi 1 1 be noted on the students record; however, the grade wi 1 1 
not. G rades from transferred courses are not i ncl uded i n the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, 
grade poi nt average cal cul ati on. See chapter 1 for additi onal i nf orrnati on. 
Courses taken at other institutions vuhileattending the University of Maryland, Col I ege Park 

L Courses taken at another institution may not be credited toward a degree without approval i n 
advance by the dean of the col I ege from whi ch the student expects a degree. The same rul e appl i es to 
regi strati on i n the summer program of another i nsti tuti on. Permission to Enroll in Another 
Institution forms are avai I abl e i n the off i ce of the students dean. Thi s form must be submitted and 
approved by the col I ege for any course whi ch wi 1 1 eventual I y be added to the uni versi ty transcri pt. 

Z Courses taken at other University of Maryland I institutions 

For students who began their attendance at the University of Maryland, CollegeParkinFall 1989 or 
later, al I course work taken at any U ni versity System of M aryl and i nstitution wi 1 1 be posted as 
transfer credit. For al I students who attended M aryl and prior to Fal 1 1989, courses taken at another 
University of Maryland Board of Regents institution (UMBC, UMAB, UMES, UMUC) priortoFall 
1989 will beincludedinthecumulativeGPA. Courses taken at any other institution may not be 
credited toward a degree without advance approval . See #L above for i nf orrnati on. 

3. USM Concurrent I nter-l institutional Registration Program 

U ni versi ty undergraduate students parti ci pati ng i n the Concurrent I nter- 1 nsti tuti onal Regi strati on 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons P 80 ^ 105 



Program shoul d obtai n perrri ssi on from thei r dean. Course work counts as resi dent credit. Students 
participating inthis program must be enrol led full timein a degree program at University of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park, for the semester i n whi ch these courses are taken. 

4 Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 

Courses taken through the Consorti um are consi deed to be resi dent credi t. See 
www.testudo. umd.edu/soc/consorti um html for more i nf ormati on. 

Transfer C redit Center 

TheTransfer Credit Center provi des arti cul ati on i nf ormati on and assi stance to students and transfer 
advisors. M ore i information is avai lable i n the section on Transfer Admission i n chapter 1 and on the 
i nternet at www.tce. umd.edu. 

Graduation Applications and Commen c ement Honors 

Graduation Applications 

Each candi date for a degree or certif i cate must f i I e a formal appl i cati on with the Off i ce of the 
Regi strar. The deadl i ne for appl i cati on i s the end of the schedul e adj ustment peri od for the semester 
i n whi ch the student pi ans to graduate, or at the end of the f i rst week of the second summer sessi on 
for August degrees. 

I n al I cases, graduati on appl i cati ons must be f i I ed at the begi nni ng of the students f i nal semester 
before recei vi ng a degree. The graduati on appl i cati ons are avai I abl e on the i nternet at 
www. my. umd.edu or at the Registrar's Off ice, 1st floor Mitchell Building. 

Comrrencement Honors 

Summa cum I aude, magna cum I aude and cum I aude are the hi ghest commencement honors that the 
University bestows for sustained excellence in scholarship. They are awarded to the top 10% of all 
students graduati ng i n each col I ege over the course of a year. Summa cum I aude i s awarded to 
students wi th a G PA equal to the hi ghest two percent of al I col I ege graduates over the past three 
terms, magna cum I aude to the next hi ghest three percent, and cum I aude to the f ol I owi ng f i ve 
percent. To be d i gi bl e for thi s recogniti on, at I east 60 semester hours must be earned at the 
uni versi ty or at a program i n whi ch credi t earned i s counted as U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege 
Park, resi dent credi t ( contact the Off i ce of the Regi strar to deterrri ne program eligibility). No more 
than 6 credi ts taken pass/f ai I or sati sf actory/f ai I shal I count toward the60-hourrrinimumNo 
student wi th a grade- poi nt average of I ess than 3. 3 wi 1 1 be consi dered for a commencement honor. 
B ecause grades for a term general I y are off i ci al I y recorded after the term's graduati on day, 
computati on of the students GPA wi 1 1 not i ncl ude grades for courses taken duri ng the students f i nal 
semester at the uni versi ty . H owever, the hours taken duri ng that semester wi 1 1 appl y toward the 
60- hour requirement. 

Election to Phi Beta Kappa 

www.ugst.urnd.edu/pbk.htrnl 

Organized i n 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely respected academic 
honorary society i n the United States. I nvitation to membership is based on 
outstandi ng schol asti c achi evement i n studi es of the I i beral arts and sci ences. Student 
members are chosen entirely on the basis of academic excel lence; neither 
extracurri cul ar I eadershi p nor servi ce to the communi ty i s consi dered. E I ecti on i s hel d 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ 106 



twi ce a year, once i n the f al I and once i n the spri ng semester. 
The process for el ecti on to Phi Beta K appa i nvol ves a revi ew i n N ovember for those 
who graduated the previ ous A ugust or those who wi 1 1 graduate i n December, and a 
revi ew i n M arch for those graduati ng i n M ay. For j uni ors the revi ew occurs i n M arch. 
The revi ew i s conducted by a sd ect comni ttee of f acul ty members represent] ng the 
humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The comni ttee reviews transcripts of 
al I students with qual ifyi ng grade poi nt averages. Whether a student qual if ies for 
membershi p i n Phi Beta Kappa depends on the quality, depth, and breadth of the 
students record i n I i beral courses. The f i nal deci si on for el ecti on rests wi th the f acul ty 
committee and faculty Phi Beta Kappa members. 

Attention Students who are under the General Education Program Requirements 

• The way in which Phi Beta Kappa criteria will apply to courses in the General 
Education Program (www.gened.umd.edu/for-stuoen^ is 
being determined. Any changes to the criteria will be posted at: 
www.ugst.umd.edu/pbk.html as soon as known. 

• A 1 1 new freshmen starti ng f al I 2012 are under the General Educati on 
Requirements. 

• Transfer and other students should visit: 
www.gened.unxl.edu/documents/GenEoTransferPol icy.pdf to determi ne whether 
they are under CORE or General Education Program Requi rements. 

Requi rements for consi derati on of membershi p i n Phi Beta K appa at the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park campus chapter i ncl ude: 

1 Grade Point Average For seniors a grade point average of at least 3.75 overall as 
wd I as i n al 1 1 i beral arts and sci ences courses taken. For j uni ors the mi ni mum grade 
poi nt average i s at I east 3.85. N ati onal PB K rul es, however, requi re that no more than 
20 percent of the students el ected i n any one year can be j uni ors, so the actual 
mi ni mum grade poi nt average for j uni or adrri ssi on may be hi gher than 3.85. 

Z Residence: At I east 60 creditlxjui^rrust be taken at the University of Maryland, 
Col I ege Park. 

3. Liberal Courses For seniors, at least 90 credit hours i n courses i n the I i beral arts 
and sci ences (where " I i beral " courses are to be di sti ngui shed from prof essi onal or 
techni cal courses) , at I east 45 of whi ch must be taken at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, 
Col I ege Park. For j uni ors, at I east 75 total credi t hours must be compl eted, at I east 60 
of which are i n courses i n the I i beral arts and sciences; of these, at least 45 must be 
taken at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. Students woul d ordi nari I y be 
maj ors i n one of the programs i n the I i beral arts and sci ences. However, students wi th 
the requisite number of I i beral credit hours can be admitted if they have completed at 
I east 5 courses ( 15 credi t hours or more) for seni ors and for j uni ors i n a si ngl e I i beral 
arts and sci ences department/program at U M CP. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ 107 



4 Required courses One semester of mathemati cs, whi ch must be f ulf i 1 1 ed by 
col lege- level credit hours (i nd udi ng AP credit but not exemption by SAT), and two 
col I ege semesters of the same f ore gn I anguage at the el ementary I eve! , or atleastone 
semester above that I eve! . The I anguage requi rement may al so be sati sf i ed by 
compl eti on of four years of the same I anguage other than E ngl i sh at the hi gfvschool 
I eve! or above or the equi val ent. Students wi th such a f ore gn I anguage background 
who wish to be considered for admission to Phi Beta Kappa should notify the Phi Beta 
K appa off i ce (2110 M ari e M ount Hall) in writing and provi de the appropri ate 
documentati on (an off i ci al hi gh school transcri pt) pri or to the month of consi derati on. 
J uni ors provi di ng I ate documentati on (after M arch 1) wi 1 1 be consi dered onl y as 
seniors. 

& Distribution: The credit hours presented for Phi Beta Kappa must contai n at least 
nineli beral arts credi t hours i n each of the three f ol I owi ng areas: (a) arts and 
humanities, (b) behavioral and social sciences, (c) natural sciences and mathematics 
(including a I aboratory sci ence course) . The I aboratory sci ence course cannot be 
fulfilled by AP credit. All the courses in at least two of the three required areas must 
be compl eted at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, and i n the remai ni ng area 
no more than one A P course can be used to f ulf i 1 1 the requi rement. I n general , Phi Beta 
Kappa will accept theCORE classification of courses. In satisfying the distribution 
requi rement, however, a maxi mum of one course that sati sf i es mul ti pi e CORE 
categori es, al I otted to the category that hd ps the student the most, can be used. A P 
Hi story courses will be consi dered as satisfying only the arts and humanities 
requirement 

Students with more chal I engi ng courses and moderately hi gh grade poi nt averages are 
preferred by the corrrri ttee to those wi th hi gher grade poi nt averages but a narrow 
range of courses. M i ni mal qual if i cati ons i n more than one area may precl ude el ecti on 
to Phi Beta Kappa. 

Recommended Criteria I ncl ude: 

1. Regul ar grades ( rather than pass/f ai I ) i n mathemati cs, f ore gn I anguage courses, 
and di stri buti on areas. 

2. Some tradi ti onal soci al sci ences and humani ti es courses that requi re wri tten 
essays and papers. (Note that internships may be counted as professional courses 
and not as I i beral courses) . 

Meeting the above requi rements does not guarantee el ecti on to Phi Beta Kappa. The 
j udgment of the resident faculty members of Phi Beta Kappa on the quality, depth, and 
breadth of the student's record i s the deci di ng factor i n every case. A ny questi ons about 
criteria for election to Phi Beta Kappa (i ncl udi ng equivalency exani nations i n foreign 
languages) should be directed to the Phi Beta Kappa Office Dr. Denis Sullivan, and 
301-405-8986. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons f" 80 ^ 108 



Academic I nteep- ity 

TheUniversity of Maryland is an academic community. Its fundamental purpose is the pursuit of 
knowledge. Like all other communities, the University can function properly only if its members 
adhere to cl earl y establ i shed goal s and val ues. Essenti al to the fundamental purpose of the 
U ni versi ty i s the comrri tment to the pri nci pi es of truth and academi c honesty. A ccordi ngl y , the 
Code of Academe Integrity i s desi gned to ensure that the pri nci pi e of academi c honesty i s uphd d. 
Whileall members of the University share this responsibility, the Code of Academic I ntegrity \s 
desi gned so that sped al responsi bi I ity for uphol di ng the pri nci pi e of academi c honesty I i es with the 
students. 

T he U ni versi ty 's Code of Academe / ntegrity i s a nati onal I y recogni zed honor code, adrri ni stered by 
a Student H onor Counci I . A ny of the f ol I owi ng acts, when comrri tted by a student, shal I consti tute 
academic dishonesty: 

C head ng I ntenti onal I y usi ng or attempti ng to use unauthori zed materi al s, i nf ormati on, or study ai ds 
i n any academi c exerci se. 

Fabrication: I ntenti onal and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in 
an academi c exerci se. 

Facilitating academic dishonesty: I ntenti orally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another 
to vi ol ate any provi si on of the Code of Academic Integrity. 

Plagiarism I ntenti onal I y or knowi ngl y representi ng the words or i deas of another as one's own i n 
any academi c exerci se. 

I f it i s deterrri ned that an act of academi c di shonesty has occurred, a grade of X F i s consi dered the 
normal sancti on for undergraduate students. The grade of X F i s noted on the academi c transcri pt as 
f ai I ure due to academi c di shonesty. Lesser or more severe sancti ons may be i imposed when there are 
ci rcumstances to warrant such consi derati on. Suspensi on or expul si on from the U ni versi ty may be 
i imposed even f or a f i rst off ense. 

Students shoul d consul t the Code of Academic I ntegrity, at 

www. presi dent, umd.edu/pol i ci es/i i i 100a. html for further i nf ormati on regardi ng procedures for 

reporti ng and resol vi ng al I egati ons of academi c di shonesty. 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ 109 



Honor Pledge 

I n 2002, the U ni versity adopted an honor pledge i n which students are asked to write out and sign 
the pi edge on maj or assi gnments and exams, as desi gnated by the i nstructor. The H onor PI edge i s 
desi gned to encourage i nstructors and students to ref I ect upon the U ni versi ty 's core i nsti tuti oral 
val ue of academic i integrity. Professors who i nvite students to sign the Honor Pledge signify that 
there i s an ethi cal component to teachi ng and I earni ng. Students who write by hand and si gn the 
PI edge aff i rm a sense of pri de i n the i ntegrity of thei r work. The PI edge states: 

"/ pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized assistance on this 
assignment/ examination. " 

For more in fo rma ti on regardingtheCodeof 'Academe I ntiegity, the Honor Pledget or the 
Student Honor Council please refer to vwwv.shc.umd.edu or contact the Office of Student Conduct 

Student Conduct 

The pri mary purpose for the i imposition of disci pi i ne i n the university setti ng is to protect the campus 
community. Consi stent with that purpose, reasonabl e efforts are al so made to foster the personal and 
soci al devd opment of those students who are hd d accountabl e for vi ol ati ons of uni versi ty 
regul ati ons. Compared to di sci pi i nary systems at many uni versi ti es, U ni versi ty of M aryl and 
students are given unusual authority and responsi bi I ity for management of the campus process. 
M embershi p on the student j udi ci ary i s an extraordi nary educati onal experi ence, and opportuni ty to 
be of servi ce to the community, and a personal honor. 

Cases that may result i n suspension or expulsion are heard by conduct boards, comprised enti rdy of 
students. I n such cases, students are accorded substantial procedural protections, i ncl udi ng an 
opportunity for a heari ng and an appeal . Less serious cases are resolved i n disci pi i nary conferences 
conducted by U ni versity staff members. Acts of violence (i ncl udi ng any sexual assault), 
intinridati on, di srupti on, or ri oti ng; substanti al theft or vandal i sm; fraud or forgery; use or 
di stri buti on of i 1 1 egal drugs; and any Code of Student Conduct vi ol ati on moti vated by consi derati ons 
of sex, race, ethni c ori gi n, sexual ori entati on or rd i gi on are forms of mi sconduct that most 
frequently result in dismissal from the University. Students accused of violating University 
di sci pi i nary regul ati ons are encouraged to di scuss the al I egati ons wi th thd r parents or guardi ans, 
legal counsd, and with appropriate university staff members. 

Prohibited Conduct 

A compl ete I i st of conduct consi deed prohi bi ted as wd I procedures for resol vi ng al I egati ons of 

mi sconduct may be found i n theCocfe of Student Conduct at www. presi dent, umd.edu/pol i ci es or 

through the Office of Student Conduct website at www.studentconiduct.umd.edu 

The f ol I owi ng i s general noti ce of what constitutes prohi bited conduct and i s subj ect to di sci pi i nary 

action: 

• Use, possession or storage of any weapon 

• Causi ng physical harm or apprehension of harm 

• Initiating or causi ng to be i niti ated a f al se report, warni ng or threat of f i re, expl osi on or other 
emergency 

• A cri mi nal offense committed off-campus 

• V i ol ati ng the terms of any di sci pi i nary sancti on 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons f" 80 ^ HO 



• M i susi ng or damagi ng f i re safety equi pmert 

• Di stri buti on or possessi on for purposes of di stri buti on of any i 1 1 egal drug 

• F urni shi ng f al se i nf ormati on to the U ni versi ty 

• M aki ng, possessi ng, or usi ng any forged, altered, or f al sif i ed i nstrument of i dentifi cati on 

• I nterferi ng with the freedom of expressi on of others 

• Theft of property or of services; possession of stolen property 

• Destroyi ng or damagi ng the property of others 

• E ngagi ng i n di sorderl y or di srupti ve conduct 

• Failure to comply with the directions of university officials 

• U se or possessi on of any i 1 1 egal drug or control I ed substances 

• Use or possession of f i reworks on university premises 

• U se or possessi on of any al cohol i c beverage under the age of 21 or provi di ng al cohol i c 
beverages to a person known to be under the age of 21 

• V i ol ati on of publ i shed uni versi ty regul ati ons or pol i ci es i ncl udi ng the resi dence hal I contract, 
as well as those regul ati ons relating to entry and use of University facilities, sale of 

al cohol i c beverages, use of vehi cl es and ampl ifyi ng equi pment, campus 

demonstrati ons, rri suse of i dentifi cati on cards, parki ng regul ati ons, hazi ng pol i cy, sexual 

assault, and sexual harassment. 

Note Effective April 2006, students who viol ate the foil owing section will be dismissed from the 
University: 

Rioting, assault theft, vandalism fire-setting, or other serious misconduct related to a 
University-sponsored event occurring on- or off-campus, that results inharmto persons or 
property or otherwise poses a threat to the stability of the carrpus or campus community 
may result in disciplinary action regardless of the existence status, or outcome of any 
criminal charges in a court of law related to misconduct associated with a 
university-sponsored event 

For more i nf ormati on regardi ng student conduct i ssues, contact the Off i ce of Student Conduct at 
301-314-8204 or visit www.studentconduct.umd.edu. 



Summary of Policies and Regulations Pertaining to Students 

Descriptions of these policies are for general information only. PI ease refer to specific texts for 

off i ci al I anguage. M odif i cati ons may be made or other pol i ci es may be added throughout the year. 

PI ease contact the Off i ce of Student Conduct for addi ti onal i nf ormati on. 

I n addition to the pol icies repri nted or identified elsewhere (eg., theCocfe of Student Conduct end 

Code of Academic Integrity), students enrol I ed at Col I ege Park are expected to be aware of, and to 

abi de by, the pol i ci es summari zed bd ow. I nf ormati on about where the compl ete texts may be 

consulted f ol I ows each summary. Thi s i nf ormati on was compi I ed and provi ded by the Off i ce of 

Student Conduct. 

Alcoholic Beverage Policy and Procedures forbid unauthorized possession, use, or distribution of 

al cohol i c beverages on uni versi ty property. Certai n excepti ons are sped f i ed. ( I nf ormati on subj ect to 

change pending legislation. Originally approved by the Board of Regents, September 26, 1969. 

L egal dri nki ng age i n the State of M aryl and i s 21 years. Repri nted i n Student H andbook. ) 

Policy on Amplifying Equipment restri cts the hours and I ocati ons of use of certai n forms of sound 

ampl i f yi ng equi pment, provi des a procedure for the authori zati on of otherwi se restri cted uses of 

sound ampl ifyi ng equi pment, and I ocates responsi bi I ity for compl ai nts with those usi ng the 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons f 80 ^ m 



equi pmert. (A dopted by the U ni versi ty Senate, J une 2, 1970. Repri nted i n the Student H andbook. ) 

Campus Activities Policies regul ate reservati on of uni versi ty faci lities, adverti si ng, co-sponsorshi p, 

cancel I ati on and postponement, and vari ous other matters rd ati ng to programs of student 

organizations. (Published in the Event Management Handbook. For more information, contact the 

Campus Reservations Office.) 

Computer Use Policy defines standards for reasonable and acceptable use of University computer 

resources, i ncl udi ng d ectroni c mai I . 

Pd icy on Demonstrations establ i shes gui dd i nes for demonstrati ons and pi cketi ng. Sti pul ates that 

the uni versi ty wi 1 1 take steps necessary both to protect the ri ght of i ndi vi dual s or groups to 

demonstrate and to protect the freedom of speech, assembl y, and movement of any i ndi vi dual or 

group. (Adopted by the U ni versi ty Senate, J une 2, 1970. Repri nted i n the Student Handbook.) 

Examination Rules set general standards for student conduct duri ng exami nati ons. They are 

appl i cabl e to al I exami nati ons gi ven at the Col I ege Park campus uni ess contrary i nstructi ons are 

provi ded by the f acul ty member adrni ni steri ng the exami nati on. ( Pri nted on most uni versi ty 

exami nati on books. See al so chapter 4. ) 

Policy on Hazing and Statement on Hazing prohibits hazing, which is defined as intentionally or 

reckl essl y subj ecti ng any person to the ri sk of bodi I y harm or severe emoti onal di stress, or causi ng 

or encouragi ng any person to comrni t an act that woul d be a vi ol ati on of I aw or uni versi ty 

regul ati ons, for the purpose of initiating, promoti ng, f osteri ng, or corf i rrri ng any form of aff i I i ati on 

with a student group or organization, as defi ned by the Code of Student Conduct The express or 

implied consent of the victim will not be a defense. For moreinformati on, contact the Office of 

Student Conduct. 

Campus Parking Regulations cover registration, permits, fees, violations, enforcement, fines, 

towing and impounding, reviews, carpool programs, special events parking, emergency parking, and 

a number of other areas. Notably, the regulations provide that "the responsi bi I ity of f i ndi ng an 

authorized parki ng space rests with the driver." Students who have 55 or fewer credits and I i ve i n the 

"Graham Cracker Complex" cannot register for a parki ng permit. (Current regulations i n effect si nee 

J ul y, 1997. A n i nf ormati onal gui de i s di stri buted to al I who regi ster for parki ng. For more 

i nf ormati on, contact the Department of Transportati on Servi ces. ) 

Policy Pertaining to Public Displays defi nes standards for perrri ssi bl e di spl ays, obj ects or 

structures not desi gned to be conti nuousl y carri ed or hd d by a demonstrator or pi cketer so as 

si mul taneousl y to protect freedom of expressi on and prevent unreasonabl e threats to the heal th, 

safety, security, or mission of the campus. (Approved by the President, M arch 29, 1989. For more 

i nf ormati on, contact the Off i ce of the V i ce Presi dent for Student Aff ai rs. ) 

Residence Hall Rules defi ne prohi bited conduct i n and around campus resi dence and di ni ng hal I s, 

bui I di ngs, and at Department of Resi dent Life- and/or Department of Di ni ng Servi ces-sponsored 

activities, i n addi ti on to that whi ch fal I sunder the Resi dence Hal I s/Dining Servi ces Agreement, 

Code of Student Conduct, and federal , state and I ocal I aws. The rul es al so specify standard 

sancti ons for rul e vi ol ati ons, and provi de for an adj udi cati on process. ( Repri nted i n Comrunity 

Living, the Residence Hal Is and Di ni ng Services Handbook. For more i information, contact the 

Department of Resident Life.) 

Sexual Assault Policy offers advi ce and gui dance for compl ai nants, i ncl udi ng assi stance i n f i I i ng 

criminal complaints. Defi nes and sets penalties for sexual assault. Specifies that [s]exual assault is a 

seri ous offense and the standard sancti on for any sexual assault, i ncl udi ng acquai ntance rape, i s 

expulsion. 

Student Organization Reg strati on G uidel i nes defi ne student organi zati ons, responsi bi I i ti es of 

off i cers, and regi strati on, and establ i sh types of regi strati on, a regi strati on process, certai n pri vi I eges 

of regi stered student organi zati ons i n good standi ng, sancti ons whi ch may resul t from regi strati on 

review, and guidd i nes for constitutions. (For more i information, or for a copy of the guidd i nes, 

contact the Off i ce of Campus Programs. ) 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ H2 



Proficiency Examination Programs (Credit- by- Exam, CLEP) 

The University of Maryland, College Park offers new, continuing, and returning students several 

opportuniti es to earn col I ege credit by demonstrati ng achi evement i n a subj ect f i d d through 

exarri nati on. Col I ege Park recogni zes three prof i ci ency exarri nati on programs for credi t: A dvanced 

Placement ( A P), Departmental Proficiency Examination Program (Credit-by-Exarri nati on), and 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP). Undergraduate students may earn atotal of up to 

one- hal f of the credi ts requi red for thei r degree through exami nati on. U sual I y, thi s i s no more than 

60 credits. Students are responsi bl e for consul ti ng with the appropri ate dean or advi sor about the 

appl i cabi I ity of any credits earned by exarri nati on to a specif i c degree program Students shoul d 

al so seek assi stance i n deterrri ni ng whi ch U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park courses dupl i cate 

credits earned for an exarri nation. Students will not receive credit for both passing an 

examination and completing an equivalent course. 

Advanced Placement (AP) C reef t F or compl ete i nf ormati on about the appl i cabi I i ty of A P exams 

and the assi gnment of credit, pi ease see chapter 1. 

Dep ar tmental Proficiency Examination (Credit-by-Exami nation) 

College Park Departmental Proficiency Examinations, customarily referred to as 

credit-by-examination, are comparable to comprehensive final examinations in a course. Although 

the mathemati cs and f orei gn- 1 anguage departments recei ve the most appl i cati ons for credi t by 

exarri nati on, many departments wi 1 1 provi de exarri nati ons for certai n of thei r courses. I niti al i nqui ry 

as to whether an exarri nati on i n a specif i c course i s avai I abl e i s best made at the academic 

department whi ch offers the course i n questi on. 

I f an exarri nati on for a course i s avai I abl e, the department wi 1 1 provi de i nf ormati on regardi ng ti me 

and pi ace, type of exarri nati on, and materi al whi ch mi ght be hd pful i n prepari ng for the 

exarri nati on. A n undergraduate who passes a departmental prof i ci ency exami nati on i s gi ven credi t 

and qual i ty poi nts toward graduati on i n the amount regul arl y al I owed i n the course, provi ded such 

credits do not dupl i cate credit obtai ned by some other means. After maki ng arrangements with the 

department, apply through the Division of Letters and Sciences, 1117 Hornbake Li brary, 

301-405-2793. 

Policies governing craft by examination: 

1. The applicant must be formally admitted to the University of Maryland, CollegePark. Posting 
of credit earned, however, wi 1 1 be del ayed unti I the student i s regi stered. 

2. Departmental Prof i ci ency Exarri nati ons may not be taken for courses i n whi ch the student has 
remai ned regi stered at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, beyond the Schedul e A dj ustment 
Period even with a transcri pt notation of W. 

3. Departmental Prof i ci ency Exarri nati ons may not be used to change grades, i ncl udi ng 
I ncompl etes and W i thdrawal s. 

4. A ppl i cati on for credi t- by-exarri nati on i s equi val ent to regi strati on for the course; however, the 
f ol I owi ng condi ti ons appl y : 

a. A student may cancel the appl i cati on at any ti me pri or to compl eti on of the exarri nati on 
with no entry on his/her permanent record. (Equivalent to the scheduleadj ustment period.) 

b. T he i nstructor makes the resul ts of the exami nati on avai I abl e to the student pri or to formal 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul ati ons P 80 ^ 113 



subrni ssi on of the grade. Before f i nal subrri ssi on of the grade, the student may d ect not to 
have thi s grade recorded. I n thi s case, a mark of W i s recorded. ( Equi val ent to the drop peri od. ) 

c. N o exarri nati on may be attempted more than twi ce. 

d. The i nstructor must certify on the report of the exarri nati on submitted to the Off i ce of the 
Regi strar that copi es of the exarri nati on questi ons (or i dentifyi ng i nf ormati on i n the case of 
standardi zed exarri nati ons) , and the students answers have been f i I ed wi th the chai r of the 
department off eri ng the course. 

5. I f accepted by the student (see 4b above), I etter grades earned through credit-by-exarri nati on 
are entered on the students transcri pt, and are used i n computi ng hi s/her cumul ati ve grade poi nt 
average. A student may d ect to take a credi t- by-exarri nati on Pass- F ai I onl y i f the credi t f ul f i 1 1 s an 
decti ve i n the students degree program No college, major, field of concentration, or general 
education program requirement may betaken under the pass-fail option. PI ease refer to the 
Pass-Fai I policy under the Records secti on i n thi s chapter. 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

TheCollege-Levd Examination Program (CLEP) recognizes col lege- 1 evd competence achieved 
outsi de the col I ege cl assroom Two types of C L E P tests are avai I abl e General Exarri nati ons, whi ch 
cover the content of a broad f i d d of study; and Subj ect Exarri nati ons, whi ch cover the specif i c 
content of a col lege course. Credit can be earned and wi 1 1 be recognized by Col lege Park for some 
CLEP General or Subject Exarri nations, provided satisfactory scores are attai ned. Credits earned 
under CLEP are not considered residence credit, but are treated as transfer credit. CLEP exams are 
administered at CLEP testing centers throughout the country. The University of Maryland, College 
Park is a CLEP Test Center (Test Center Code 5814). To obtai n an appl i cation or additional 
i nf ormati on, contact the C L E P A drri ni strator i n the Counsd i ng Center, Room 0106A Shoemaker 
Hall, (301-314-7688), or write to CLEP, CN 6600, Princeton, NJ , 08541-6600. Students who want 
to earn credi t through CLEP must request thd r off i ci al score reports to be sent to the Off i ce of 
Undergraduate A drri ssi on, Mitchdl Building, University of Maryland, Col I ege Park, MD 
20742-5235. (The University of Maryland, College Park, Score Recipient Code is 5814.) 
Policies governing CLEP are as follows 

1. A student must matriculate at the university before CLEP credits are official ly posted. The 
posti ng wi 1 1 not be done unti I a student has establ ished a record. 

2. Each institution of the University System of Maryland establishes standards for acceptance of 
CLEP exemptions and credits. Students must check with the i nstitution to which they wi 1 1 transfer to 
I earn if they wi 1 1 1 ose, mai ntai n, or gai n credit. 

3. Col lege Park wi 1 1 award credit for a CLEP exarri nation 

a. provi ded the exarri nati on was bd ng accepted for credit here on the date the student took the 
examination, and 

b. provi ded that the exarri nati on was not taken duri ng a students f i nal 30 credits. The f i nal 30 
hours of credit are to be taken i n resi dence, unl ess pri or approval has been granted by the 
students dean. 

4 C redit wi 1 1 not be gpven for both completing a course and passing an examination covering 
substantial ly the same material . 

5. F urthermore, credi t wi 1 1 not be awarded f or C L E P exarri nati ons i f the student has previ ousl y 



4. Regi strati on, A cademi c Requi rements, and Regul arj ons f" 80 ^ 1M 



compl eted more advanced courses i n the same f i el d. 

6. CLEP exami nations posted on transcri pts from other i nstitutions wi 1 1 be accepted if the 
exarri nati on has been approved by Col I ege Park and the scores reported are equal to or hi gher than 
those requi red by thi s i nstituti on. I f the transcri pt from the pri or i nstituti on does not carry the scores, 
it wi 1 1 be the responsi bility of the student to request Educati onal Testi ng Servi ce to forward a copy of 
the off i ci al report to the Off i ce of A drri ssi ons. U ni versi ty awards credi ts f or C L E P Exarri rati ons 
only as i ndicated on the chart provided i n this chapter (if an exarri nation is not listed, it is not 
accepted f or credi t at thi s i nsti tuti on) . 

I f you have questi ons about the appl i cabi I ity of specif i c credit to your program consult the I i st 
provi ded i n thi s catal og or contact your Dean's Off i ce. 

To seethe 2012-2013 CLEP Credit Awards and Course Equivalencies go to: 

www.umd.edu/catal c>a/attachments/CLEP.pctf . 



5. General Education Requirements Page 115 



5b General Education Requirements 

General Education Program and Requirements 

General Education Program and Requirements 

Off i ce of the Associ ate Provost and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 

2100MarieMountHall, 301-405-9363 

Contact: Dougl as Roberts, Associ ate Dean for General Educati on 

www.gened.umd.edu 

gened@umd.edu 

Becjnningin fall 2002, a new/General Education program GENERAL EDUCATI ON@UMD, 
replacestheCORE Program Students enrolled at the university prior to fall 2012will still be 
under theCORE Progja mwMMtugstumdedu/core , Newfreshmen for fall 2012 and after will 
fdlowtheGeneral Education@UMD Program WMMtgenedumdedu . Transfer and other students 
should check the General Education Program Effective Dates in fo rma ti on below. 

General Education Program: Effective Dates 

Students matriculating* to the University of Maryland (inducing freshmen and students 
transferring from private institutions and fromrion-Ma^and public institutions) beginning in 
fall 2012 will besubjecttotheUrnversitycBGeneral Education Program requirements 
WMMigenedumdeduL except as provided belowe 



1. The U ni versity of M aryland, Col lege Park requi res students to complete a rri ni mum of 40 credits 
of general educati on. Students transf erri ng to the U ni versi ty who have compl eted thei r general 
educati on requi rements at another M aryl and publ i c i nstituti on of hi gher educati on wi 1 1 be 

consi dered to have compl eted thei r general educati on requi rements with the excepti on of an 
upper- 1 eve! writi ng course and any additi onal credits necessary to compl ete the rri ni mum number of 
general education credits. 

2. Students transf erri ng to the U ni versi ty from another M aryl and publ ic institution of hi gher 
educati on who have not compl eted thei r general educati on requi rements at another M aryl and publ i c 
i nstituti on of hi gher educati on wi 1 1 be treated as f ol I ows: 

a. Students who matri cul ate to col I ege begi nni ng i n f al I 2012 and thereafter wi 1 1 be subj ect to the 
new General Education Program requi rements upon transfer to theUniversity of Maryland. 

b. Students who matri cul ate to col I ege pri or to f al I 2012 but transfer to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and 
prior to fall 2016 will be subj ect to the CORE general education requirements 

(www. ugst. umd.edu/core) . 

c. Students who transfer to the U ni versi ty of M aryl and begi nni ng i n f al I 2016 and thereafter wi 1 1 
be subj ect to the General Educati on Program requi rements, regardl ess of the date of thei r 

matri cul ati on at another M aryl and publ i c i nsti tuti on of hi gher educati on f ol I owi ng award of the hi gh 
school diploma. 

3. Students returni ng or transf erri ng to Col I ege Park after a separati on from col I ege of f i ve or more 



5. General Education Requirements Pa QP 116 



conti nuous years must f ol I ow the requi rements i n effect at the ti me of reentry. Students who 
matri cul ate to the U ni versi ty wi th a bachd ores degree from any regi onal I y accredi ted col I ege or 
uni versi ty wi 1 1 be consi dered to have sati sf i ed the U ni versi tycs general educati on requi rements, 
regardl ess of when the degree was recei ved. 

*For purposes of this transfer pol icy, matriculation means to be admitted to col lege and enrol led i n 
cl asses f ol I owi ng award of the hi gh school di pi oma. 

General Education at the University of Maryland 

Through the General Educati on program you wi 1 1 di scover that educati on at the U ni versi ty of 
M aryl and i s an experi ence that reaches from the campus cl assroom and I ab to across the gl obe. Asa 
student you wi 1 1 engage wi th that I arger uni verse by acqui ri ng new ski 1 1 s and understandi ngs. 
General Educati on exposes you to different di sci pi i nes, i improves your fundamental academi c ski 1 1 s, 
and strengthens your commitment to usi ng knowledge and abilitiesto better yourself and others. 

The General Education program will assist you in preparing for a new "multi verse" of learning, and 
for the demandi ng and constantl y changi ng worl d beyond graduati on. 1 1 provi des necessary ski 1 1 s 
and basi c knowl edge, compl ements and expands the uni versi ty 's course off eri ngs, and connects you 
more f ul I y to the i ntd I ectual communi ty of the Washi ngton- B al ti more metropol i tan area, the rati on, 
and the worl d beyond. 

General Education program goals for all students 

• Devd op the ski 1 1 s necessary to succeed i n academi c careers and i n prof essi onal I i ves by 
establ ishi ng habits and understandi ng of clear writi ng, effecti ve speaki ng and presentation, and 
critical and analytic reasoning. 

• Strengthen knowl edge i n maj or areas of study. 

• B roaden knowl edge of ci vi I i zati ons past and present 

• Establ ish the abi I ity to thrive both i ntd lectual ly and material ly and to support themsd ves, thd r 
f ami I i es, and thd r communi ti es through a broad understandi ng of the worl d i n whi ch they I i ve 
and work. 

• Define the ethical imperatives necessary to create a just society in thd r own communities and 
in the I arger world. 

IMPORTANT NOTES: General Education courses: 

• M U ST be sd ected from the courses coded as meeti ng General Educati on requi rements. See 
I i st of approved General Educati on courses at Testudo: 

http://www.testudo. umd.edu/Schedul eOf Cl asses, html . Click on the General Educati on list for 
the term you wi sh to expl ore. 

• M A Y al so be used to sati sfy col I ege, maj or, and/or supporti ng area requi rements 

• MAY NOT betaken on a Pass-Fail basis. 

ElementsoftheGENERAL E DUC ATI ON@UMD PROGRAM 
Fundamental Studies 

M aster the ski 1 1 s. ( 5 courses, 15 credi ts) 

• Mathematics 

• Analytic Reasoning 

• Academic Writing 

• Professional Writing 



5. General Education Requirements Page 117 



• Oral Communication 

Mathematics The goal of the M athemati cs requi rement i s to convey the power of mathemati cs, 
demonstrated by the variety of problems that can be modeled and solved by quantitative means. 
Ability in mathemati cs i s a critical measure of how wd I students are prepared to meet the chal I enges 
they wi 1 1 face intheir lives beyond school . Must be at te rrp tedby30credts and successfully 
completed by 60 cred ts,* 

Analytic Reasoning: Courses i n Analytic Reasoni ng foster a students abi I ity to use mathematical or 
formal methods or structured protocol s and patterns of reasoni ng to exarri ne probl ems or i ssues by 
eval uati ng evi dence, exarri ni ng proofs, anal yzi ng rd ati onshi ps between vari abl es, devd opi ng 
arguments, and drawing conclusions appropriatdy. 

I f a student passes an A nal yti cal Reasoni ng course that requi res F undamental Studi es M ath as a 
prerequi site, the M ath requi rement has al so been f ulf i 1 1 ed. 

Academic Writing: The Fundamental Studies Academic Writi ng requi rement prepares students 
with a f oundati onal understandi ng of the writi ng ski 1 1 s needed for success i n further studi es at 
Maryland and beyond. MustbeaUmptedby30 credts arid successfully completed by 60 crecf ts,* 

Professional Writing: The Fundamental Studies Professional Writing requi rement strengthens 
writi ng ski 1 1 s and prepares students for the range of writi ng expected of them after graduati on. 

Oral Communication: H uman rd ati onshi ps, from the most formal to the most personal , rest i n 
I arge measure on ski 1 1 ed I i steni ng and eff ecti ve speaki ng. Ski 1 1 f ul I i steni ng and speaki ng support 
success i n personal rd ati onshi ps, educational undertakings, professional advancement, and civic 
engagement. 

* Noexemption is allowed for SAT scores. Scores on AP and IB exams tiny provide exemption. 
Refer to the 2012-13 UndencraduateCatalog for exemption information: 
http://www.umd.edu/cataloa1 ndex.cfrn 

Distributive Studies 

Experi ence a vari ety of di sci pi i nes. ( 8 courses, 25 credi ts) 

• Natural Sciences 

• History and Social Sciences 

• Humanities 

• Scholarship in Practice 

The Program has three additi onal categori es that may be taken on thd r own or, through 

doubl e-counti ng, may be rol I ed up i nto the D i stri buti ve Studi es categori es. Two of these compri se 

the Diversity requirement: Understanding Plural Societies and Cultural Competence. The third isthe 

I -Seri es program whi ch offers students two courses that deal with maj or i ssues. With 

doubl e-counti ng, students wi 1 1 have a rri ni mum of 40 credits i n General Educati on. 

Natural Sciences courses i ntroduce the concepts and methods of studyi ng the natural worl d. 
Courses include the traditional physical and life sciences, environmental science, animal and avian 
science, and pi ant sci ence, among others. Oneof thetwo courses selected must include a 
substantial, rigorous laboratory experience, 

H istory and Social Science courses i ntroduce students to hi story and to the soci al sci ence 



5. General Education Requirements Pa QP 118 



disci pi i nes, with the; r combi nation of qual itati ve and quantitative methods. They i ncl ude courses i n 
criminology, economics, history, psychology, sociology, and other social sciences. 

Humanities courses study the history and the genres of human creativity. They i ncl ude courses i n 
I iteratures i n any I anguage, art and art hi story, cl assi cs, and musi c and musi c hi story, as wd I as i n 
the di sci pi i nes of I i ngui sti cs and phi I osophy, among others. 

Schdarshi p i n Practice courses engage students i n appl y i ng a body of knowl edge to create 
professional products or works of art. Architecture, business, education, engineering, and 
j ournal i sm offer courses that I ead to products such as architectural desi gns, new technol ogi es, 
i nnovati ve publ i cati ons, new computer software, busi ness pi ans, adverti si ng campai gns, educati onal 
curricula, and bioengineering. Creative and artistic performance courses lead students to produce 
writi ng portfol ios, plays, operas, dance productions, art exhi bits, and creative media. Scholarshi p i n 
Practi ce al so i ncl udes courses that combi ne competency i n speaki ng, writi ng, and transl ati on i n a 
foreign language. Onecflhet^jSdidarsNpinPracdceaxiraesselecbBdnt^bea^dethe 
studentfe major requirements, 

To f ul f i 1 1 the D i stri buti ve Studi es requi rement: 

• Students must compl ete two courses i n each of the four D i stri buti ve Studi es areas for a total of 
eight courses i n Distri buti ve Studies. One of the courses i n the Natural Sciences must i ncl ude a 
laboratory experience. 

• Two of the ei ght courses must be I -Seri es courses. I -Seri es courses doubl e-count with 
Distri buti ve Studies. AP credit may not be used to satisfy the I -Series requi rement. 

• AP creditfor Distributive Studies is limited to six of the eight courses. 

• One of the two Schol arshi p i n Practi ce courses must be outsi de the maj or requi rements. 

• Coursework withi n one's major is permitted to satisfy both the major and general education 
requirements. 

• A Diversity requi rement may befulfi I led by a course that is approved for both a Diversity 
category and for a Distri buti ve Studies category. 

Diversity 

Explore human, social, and cultural differences. (2 courses, 4-6 credits that normally double-count 
with Distributive Studies) 

• Understanding Plural Societies 

• Cultural Competence 

To f ulf i 1 1 the Diversity requi rement: 

• Students must compl ete two U nderstandi ng PI ural Soci eti es courses (6 credits total ) 
OR 

• One U nderstandi ng PI ural Societies course (3 credits) and one Cultural Competence course 
(1-3 credits). 

Courses f ul f i 1 1 i ng the D i versi ty requi rement may doubl e-count i n an approved D i stri buti ve Studi es 
category. 

Students wi 1 1 not be abl e to f ulf i 1 1 U nderstandi ng PI ural Soci eti es and/or Cultural Competence by a 
study abroad experi ence unl ess the study abroad course carri es that specif i c desi gnati on. 

I -Series 

C noose from a uni que sui te of courses that form the cornerstone of D i stri buti ve Studi es. ( 2 courses, 



5. General Education Requirements Page 119 



6 credi ts that doubl e-count wi th D i stri buti ve Studi es) 
Thel-Senesisthesignalureprogramcf General Education at the University cf Maryland 

I -Seri es courses are lively and contemporary. They speak to i important i ssues that spark the 
i magi nati on, demand i ntd I ect, and i nspi re i nnovati on. They chal I enge students to wresti e with bi g 
questi ons, and exarri ne the ways that different di sci pi i nes address them I -Seri es courses are not 
surveys of parti cul ar f i el ds of knowl edge. I nstead, I -Seri es courses provi de students with the basi c 
concepts, approaches, and vocabul ary of parti cul ar di sci pi i nes and f i d ds of study as wd I as an 
understandi ng of how experts i n those di sci pi i nes and f i d ds empl oy terms, concepts, and 
approaches. V i si t www.iseries.umd.edu for al I the detai I s and course of f eri ngs. 

• To vi ew the General Educati on Requi rement C heckl i st, see 
hMp://www.aened.uird.edu/dc)cu^ 

• To view Frequently Asked Questions, see htrp://www.gened.umd.edu/faqs-gened.php 

• To obtain a General Educati on@U M D Academic Planner and Record Keeper, visit your 
col lege advisi ng office, or the Office of Undergraduate Studies (2110 M arie M ount Hal I ). 

CORE Program Requirements 

Off i ce of the Associ ate Provost and Dean for U ndergraduate Studi es 
2110MarieMountHall, 301-405-9361 
Contact: Laura SI avi n, Assi start to the Dean 
www, ugst. umd.edu/core 

IMPORTANT: SeenGeneral Education Program Effective Dateso above to determine 
whether you are under the CORE Pro-am Requirements or the General Education Program 
Requirements 

• To vi ew Learni ng Outcome Goal s for the CORE Program see 
www.ugst.umd.edu/core/Learni naOutcome.htm 

• To view the CORE Program Requi rements Outi i ne www. ugst. umd.edu/core/core_ req. html 

• To obtai n a CORE Academic Planner and Record Keeper, visit your col lege advisi ng office, 
or the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es, 2110 M ari e M ount H al I . 

CORE Program Elements 

1. Fundamental Studies bui I d competence and corf i dence i n basi c writi ng and mathemati cs. 

M astery of these basi cs enhances success both duri ng and after col I ege. Students begi n f ulf i 1 1 i ng 
F undamental Studi es requi rements i n thd r f i rst year at the U ni versi ty . 
www, ugst. umd. edu/core/d ements/F undaSt html 

2. Distributive Studies f ocus on breadth, i ncl udi ng courses i n the f ol I owi ng categori es: L iterature 
The H i story or Theory of the A its; H umaniti es; Physi cal Sci ences; L if e Sci ences; M athemati cs and 
Formal Reasoning; Social or Political History; Behavioral and Social Sciences; and Interdisciplinary 
and E mergi ng I ssues. Students general I y pursue D i stri buti ve Studi es i n the f i rst two years of thd r 
course work. www, ugst. umd. edu/core/el ements/D i strSt html 

3. Advanced Studies al I ow students to enhance the r degree and strengthen their critical thi nki ng 
and writi ng ski 1 1 s by taki ng two upper- 1 evd courses outsi de thd r maj or after 60 credits. Students 
may substitute an approved CORE Capstone course i n thd r maj or or a seni or or honors thesi s for 
one of these two courses, www, ugst. umd. edu/core/d ements/A dvanSt html 



5. General Education Requirements Page I 20 



4. H uman C ultural Diversity gi ves students the opportuni ty to exarri ne thei r i deas and val ues i n 

the I i ght of vari ous cul tural , i ntd I ectual , and soci al contexts. D i versi ty courses i ncrease knowl edge 
of what constitutes difference and i ncrease students' ability to I earn from and appreci ate peopl e, 
cultures, i deas, and art forms that are often different from those they know best. Students may 
compl ete the C ul tural D i versi ty requi rement at any ti me before graduati on. www. ugst. umd. edu/core/d < 
www.uast.urrd.edu/core/dements/Diversity.html 

IMPORTANT NOTES: Fuiidamental and Distributive Studies courses 

• M U ST be sd ected from the approved CORE course I i sts to count toward CORE requi rements. 
At www, ugst. umd.edu/core cl i ck on hWhat are the CORE Courses?6 for I i nks to the current 

I i sts of approved courses i n each CORE category. 

• M AY al so be used to sati sfy col I ege, maj or, and/or supporti ng area requi rements if the courses 
also appear on CORE Fundamental or Distri buti ve Studies lists. 

• CORE courses MAY NOT betaken on a Pass-Fail basis. 

I. CORE Fundamental Studies 

Three Courses (9 credits) Requi red 

1. One course in Academic Writing (Must be attempted within the first 30 credits; must be passed 

within the first 60 credits.) See: http://www.engl ish.umd.edu/academi cs/academicwriti ng 

• Approved CORE Academic Writing Courses: 

ENGL 101 Academe Writi ng 

ENGL 101A Academic Writing (M ust betaken if student has TSWE [SAT verbal subtest] 
score bdow 33) 

ENGL 101H Academic Writi ng (Honors Students) 

ENGL 101X Academic Writing (Students for whom English is a second language may 
register for ENGL101X instead of ENGL 101.) 

• Note Based on scores from dther theTOEFL or M El P, students may be requi red to complete 
a program of English I anguage i nstructi on for non- nati ve speakers through the M E I before 
bei ng al lowed to register for ENGL 101X . 

Exempti ons f rom Acaderri c Writi ng requi rement (CORE Program Only) : 

• A P E ngl i sh Language and Compositi on test score of 4 or 5, OR 

• SAT verbal score 670 or above for scores achi eved between M ay 1995 and February 2005. (I n 
A pri I 1995, the Educati onal Testi ng Servi ce re-centered the scores on the SAT. Students 
whose test scores are from before A pri 1 1995 must have reed ved a score of 600 or above to be 
exempt f rom Academi c Writi ng. Thi s re-centeri ng does not ref I ect a rai si ng of the requi rement 
for exempti on, but a change i n the scori ng system used by ETS. 

• I n M arch 2005, ETS began the use of a new SAT test for writi ng. I nf orrnati on about 
exempti on i n connecti on with SAT tests taken after M arch 2005 wi 1 1 be avai I abl e at 
www.engl i sh. urrd.edu/fw-program-general/fwp-exempti ons/. 

• Begi nni ng i n f al I 2012, students under the new General Educati on program wi 1 1 not be 
exempted from the Academic Writing requirement based on SAT scores. 

Z One course in Mathematics (M ust be attempted within the first 30 credits; must be passed within 
the first 60 credits.) See www, ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/F undamental /F undaSt- math, html 

Approved CORE Fundamental Studies Mathematics Courses: 



5. General Education Requirements Page 121 



MATH 110 Elementary Mathematical Models; OR 

MATH 112 Col lege A I gebra with A ppli cations and Trigonometry; OR 

M ATH 113 Col I ege A I gebra with A ppl i cati ons; OR 

MATH 115 Pre-cal cuius; OR 

Any 100-or 200-1 evd MATH or STAT course except MATH 199, 210, 211, 212,213, 214, and 274. 

Exempti ons from M athemati cs requi rement: 

• SAT M ath score of 600 or above; OR 

• AP score of 4 or above i n Calcul us AB or BC; OR 

• AP score of 4 or above i n Statistics; OR 

• CLEP Calculus Exam score of 50 or higher. 

• Begi nni ng i n f al I 2012, students under the new General Educati on program wi 1 1 not be 
exempted from the M athemati cs requi rement based on SAT scores. 

N ote I f you are pi aced i n the Devd opmental M ath Program by the M athemati cs PI acement Exam 
you may be offered the opportunity to combi ne your Devd opmental course with the appropri ate 
subsequent course of MATH 110, 111, 113, or 115 and thus f i nish both i n one semester. For further 
i nformarj on, pi ease see the Devd opmental M ath Program web site 
www, math, umd.edu/undergraduate/courses/fsm html 

3. One course i n Professional Writi ng (taken after 60 credits). .www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Funda 
www, ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/F undamental /F unda-St-prof essi onal , html 

Approved CORE Professional Writing Courses: 

ENGL 390 Science Writing 

ENGL 391 Advanced Composition 

ENGL 392 Legal Writing 

ENGL 393 Technical Writing 

ENGL 394 Business Writing 

ENGL 395 Writing for Health Professions 

ENGL 398Topics in Professional Writing 

Suffixed versions of the above course numbers also fulfill the CORE Professional Writing 
requirement. 

Exempti on from Prof essi onal Writi ng Requi rement: 

• Grade of "A" in ENGL 101 (NOT ENGL 101A or ENGL 101X), exceptfor students majoring 
i n Engi neeri ng. Al I Engi neeri ng majors must take ENGL 393. 

• Begi nni ng i n f al I 2012, students under the new General Educati on program wi 1 1 not be 
exempted from the Professional Writing requirement based on a grade of "A" inENGL 101. 

Note No exemption from the Professional Writi ng requi rement wi 1 1 be granted for achievement on 
SAT verbal exam Professional Writing courses cannot be used to fulfill Advanced Studies 
requirements. 

II. CORE Distributive Studies 

N i ne Courses (28 credits) Requi red 

See the most current I i sti ngs of approved CORE courses at www, ugst. umd.edu/core or the onl i ne 

Schedul e of C I asses at www.testudo. umd.edu/Schedul eOf C I asses, html 

L Humanities and the Arts-three courses required 



5. General Education Requirements Page 122 



• One course from Literature (HL) list: 

www, ugst. uiril edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/H L , html . and 

• One course from The H i story or Theory of the A its ( H A ) I i st: .www. ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/C 
www, ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/H i storyCo. html and 

• One more course from Literature (HL), OR The History or Theory of the Arts (HA), OR 
Humanities (HO) lists. HO List: 

www, ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/H umani ti esCo. html 

Note There is no specific CORE requirement for a course from the Humanities (HO) list. 
Z The Sciences and Mathematics- three courses required: 

• U p to two courses from Physi cal Sci ences ( PL/PS) I i sts 

PL List: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/courses/Distri buti ve/Physi cal LabCo.html 
PS List: www, ugst. umd.edu/core/courses/Di stri buti ve/Physi cal Courses, html 

• Up to two courses from Life Sci ences (LL/LS) lists 

LL List: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/L i f eL abCo. html 
LS List: www, ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/L i f eCo. html 

• Up to one course from Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) list 

MS List: www.ugst.umd.edu/core/coui3es/Distributive/MatJiCo.htrTi 

Notes: At least one science course MUST include or be acconrpanied by a lab taken in the same 
semester (LL or PL lists only). More than one lab course may be taken. Courses must be taken from 
at least two of the three lists. There is no specific CORE requirement for a course from the 
Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) list At least two life and/or physical science courses must 
betaken (PL, PS, LL, and LS lists). The third Sci 'ences and Mathematics course may be another 
science selection or may be chosen from the Mathematics and Formal Reasoning (MS) course lists. 

3. Social Sciences and History-three courses required: 

• One course from Social or Political History (SH) list 

SH L i st: www, ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/Soci al Co. html and 

• Two courses from B ehavi oral and Sod al Sci ences ( SB ) I i st 

SB List: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/B ehavCo. html 

4* 1 nterdisciplinary and Emerging Issues (CORE CODE: IE) 

OPTIONAL CORE DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES CATEGORY EFFECTIVE BEGINNING FALL 
2005 

Details at: http://www.ugst.urrrl.edU/core/element5/DistrSthtml#E 

• IE is an optional CORE distributive studies category; Students may fulfill CORE requirements 
without taki ng an I E course. 

• Only one I E course may be counted toward f ulf i 1 1 i ng CORE Distri buti ve Studies requi rements. 



5. General Education Requirements Page 1" 



• Whether a student takes an IE course or not, total CORE Distributive Studies course and credit 
requi rements remai n the same at I east 9 courses and 28 credits. 

IE L i st: www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i stri buti ve/| E , html 

III. CORE Advanced Studies 

Two Courses (6 credits) Requi red 

Students may choose thd r two Advanced Studi es courses from a wi de range of upper- 1 evd offeri ngs 

outsi de thei r maj ors. Good choi ces i ncl ude courses that mesh with or expand educati onal goal s or 

other i nterests, i ncrease knowl edge, and strengthen critical thi nki ng and writi ng ski 1 1 s. 

CORE Advanced Studies Requirement Two upper- 1 evd (300- or 400-1 evd ) courses outsi de the 

major taken after 60 credits. Students may substitute a CORE approved senior capstone course i n 

thd r maj or or a seni or or honors thesi s for one of the two requi red Advanced Studi es courses. 

E nrol I ment i n CORE Capstone courses wi 1 1 be subj ect to departmental gui dd i nes. The other course 

must be outsi de the maj or. Students compl eti ng doubl e maj ors or doubl e degrees wi 1 1 have f ul f i 1 1 ed 

the campus Advanced Studi es requi rement, unl ess thd r pri mary maj or or col I ege has additi onal 

requi rements. The student's acaderri c col I ege deterrri nes whether or not a course i s "outsi de the 

maj or" for the purpose of f ulf i 1 1 i ng CORE Advanced Studi es. 

Thefollowing may NOT be used to fulfil I Advanced Studies requirements: 

• Professional Writing courses (courses that meet the Fundamental Studies upper-levd writing 
requirement); 

• courses used to meet D i stri buti ve Studies requi rements; 

• i nternshi ps, practi ca, or other experi end al I earni ng types of courses; 

• courses taken on a pass/f ai I basi s. 

One independent studies course (mini mum of three credits, outside the maj or) may be used toward 
Advanced Studi es requi rements as I org as it i s consi stent with the rul es above and the faculty 
member supervi si ng the i ndependent study agrees that it i s appropri ate for Advanced Studi es. 
Notes: CORE Capstone courses mist betaken within the major. A senior thesis (nrininrumof3 
credits) or successful completion and defense of an honors thesis in either the Honors College or a 
Departmental Honors Program(minimumof 3 credits) counts as CORE Capstone credit 
CORE Capstone L ist www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/A dvanced/CapstoneCo. html 

IV. CORE Human Cultural Diversity 

One Course (3 credits) Requi red 

Seethe CORE D i versi ty L i st at www. ugst. umd. edu/core/courses/D i versi ty . html or the onl i ne 

Schedule of Classes at www.tesfajdo.umd.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.html 

Cultural Diversity courses focus pri mari ly on: (a) the history, status, treatment, or accompl ishment 

of women or minority groups and subcultures; (b) non-Western culture, or (c) concepts and 

implicati ons of di versi ty . 

Note: A number of CORE Human Cultural Diversity courses also satisfy CORE Distributive Studies, 

Advanced Studies, or a college, major, and/or supporting area requirement 

Study Abroad and Satisfying CORE Requirements see: 

http://www. ugst. umd.edu/core/mord nf o/StudyA broad, html 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 124 

6. TheCdlegesand Schools 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING AND PRESERVATION (ARCH) 

1298 A rchitecture B ui I di ng, 301-405-8000 
www.arch.umd.edu 
arcinfo@umd.edu 
Dean: David Conrath 

Associate Dean(s): Marie Howland, GerritKnaap 
Assistant Dean(s): Ingrid Farrell 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation offers a four-year pre- professional undergraduate program 
I eadi ng to the B achel or of Sci ence degree i n archi tecture. The School al so offers graduate programs I eadi ng to the 
professional degrees of Master of Architecture, Master of Historic Preservation, Master of Community Planning, and 
M aster of Real Estate Devel opment as we! I as j oi nt prof essi onal degrees and certifi cates. The School offers a 
post- professional Master of Science in Architecture degree and a Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Planning and Design. 
Students graduati ng wi th the undergraduate maj or i n archi tecture typi cal I y requi re two years to compl ete the curri cul um 
I eadi ng to the prof essi onal degree i n archi tecture. PI ease see the graduate catal og for more i nf ormarj on on graduate 
programs at the School of A rchi tecture 

The School is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA). 

Students recei ve ri gorous and comprehensi ve i nstructi on from a f acul ty whose members are acti ve i n prof essi onal 
practi ce or research. M any f acul ty members have di sti ngui shed themsel ves across the prof essi onal spectrum and 
represent different approaches to architectural design. Their individual areas of expertise include architectural design 
and theory, history, architectural archaeology, technology, urban design and planning, and historic preservation. 
Visiting critics, lecturers, and the Kea Distinguished Professor augment the faculty; together they provide students with 
the requi si te exposure to contemporary realities of archi tectural desi gn. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Accrecftations 

NAAB-lntheUnited States, most state regi strati on boards requi re a degree f rom an accredi ted prof essi onal degree 
program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole 
agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the 
Bachelor of Architecture, the M aster of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture A program may be granted a 
6- year, 3- year, or 2-year term of accredi tati on, dependi ng on the extent of i ts conformance wi th establ i shed educati onal 
standards. 

Doctor of Architecture and M aster of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre professional undergraduate 
degree and a professional graduate degree that when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional 
education. However, the pre professional degree is not by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. 
The University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation offers the followingNAAB-accredited 
degree programs: 

• M .Arch (pre professional degree +60 graduate credits) 

• M .Arch (non- pre professional degree + 109 credits) 



Facilities 

The school i s housed i n a modem bui I di ng provi di ng desi gn workstati ons for each student a 300 seat audi tori um, and 
serri nar and cl assroom faci I i ti es. The G reat Space, an atri um at the center of the School , i s the I ocati on for col I aborate 
proj ects, desi gn revi ews, cri ti ques, and a vari ety of events that that bri ng the archi tecture program together. Facilities 
include a well-equipped woodworking and model shop, computer labs, digital output and digital fabrication. The 
A rchi tecture L i brary , one of the f i nest i n the nati on, offers conveni ent access to a current ci rcul ati ng col I ecti on of more 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 125 



than 24,000 vol umes, 6,000 peri odi cal s, and an extensi ve sel ecti on of reference materi al s. Rare books and sped al 
acqui si ti ons i ncl ude a col I ecti on rel ati ng to i ntemati onal exposi ti ons and the 11, 000- vol ume N ati onal Trust for H i stori c 
Preservation Library. The Elizabeth D. Alley Visual Resources Col I ecti on includes a reserve col I ecti on of 500,000 
slides on architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, architectural science, and technology as well as 
audi o-vi sual equi pment for cl assroom and studi o use. 

U pper I evel summer programs i ncl ude travel to Rome, Pari s, Turkey, G reat Britain, and other countri es. Students may 
earn di rect credi t doi ng hands-on restorati on work and by attendi ng I ectures by vi si ti ng archi tects, preservati oni sts, and 
schol ars. U ndergraduate Seni ors and graduate students may al so parti ci pate i n a Study A broad Semester at the School 's 
facility at Kiplin Hall, in northern England. 

Admission Requirements 

www. I ep. umd. edu for i nf ormati on on appl yi ng to the L i mi ted E nrol I ment Program i n the F al I semester onl y 
www.transf eradvi si ng. umd. edu for transfer advi si ng questi ons 

Architecture is a Limited Enrollment Program (LEP). Seewww.lep.umd.edu for information on Limited Enrollment 
Programs and a I i nk to A rchi tecture. A 1 1 students must meet the requi rements for admi ssi on to the L E P by appl yi ng for 
a Revi ew at approxi mate! y 45 credi ts. 

F reshman Admission. Students wi th the most competi ti ve records from hi gh school gai n di rect admi ssi on to the 
U ndergraduate A rchi tecture Program through the U ni versi ty A dmi ssi ons Of f i ce E arl y appl i cati on i s strongl y 
recommended due to limited space i n the program A dmi tted freshmen have access to the necessary advi si ng through 
their initial semesters to determi ne if architecture is an appropriate major for their interests and abilities. 

Once a student has earned 45 credits, he/she must have successful I y compl eted a sped f i c set of courses 
called "gateway" requi rements.Note Only one gateway' or performance review course may be repeated 
to earn the required grade and that course may only be repeated once Freshmen who are admitted to 
archi tecture must appl y for a 45 credi 1 1 i mi ted enrol I ment revi ew on F ebruary 1st duri ng the r fourth 
semester. To meet the provi si ons of the revi ew, these students must demonstrate the r ability to compl ete the 
f ol I owi ng ' ' gateway' ' requi rements: 

• Fundamental Studies General Education requirements 

• Distri buti ve Studi es requi rements 

• ARCH 170, 225, 226, and 242 with a grade of 3.0 or higher i n each course 

• M ATH 220, PH Y S 121 and one of the courses** I i sted be! ow with a mi ni mum grade of 2.0 i n each and an 
overall minimum grade point average of 2.67 in all three This guideline typically allows for one grade of 'C-' 
across these three courses. 

** Students must take one of the courses be! ow: 

• ENSP101 (3) Environmental Science 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology 

• GEOL 123/M ETO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I mpli cati ons of Global Change 

• PHY S 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 

Students may be enrol I ed i n A RC H 226 and compl eti ng thei r di stri buti ve studi es contemporaneous wi th the 45 credi t 
I i ni ted enrol I ment review duri ng the rfourth semester. A rrinimumcumulativeGPA of 2.00 in all college level 
coursework i s al so requi red. I n addi ti on, the revi ew wi 1 1 i ncl ude an assessment of two I etters of recorrmendati ons, 
transcri pts, an essay, and a portf ol i o, the nature of whi ch i s sped f i ed by the A rchi tecture Program PI ease contact the 
U ndergraduate A rchi tecture A dvi sors at archadvi se@umd.edu for a 45 C redi t L i rri ted E nrol I ment Revi ew A ppl i cati on 
normal I y avai I abl e i n October pri or to the F ebruary submi ssi on. The appl i cati on, detai I ed portf ol i o requi rements and 
deadlinesarealsoavailableonlineatwww.arch.umd.edu. Seethe STUDENTS tab for information on Student Affairs. 

Note Freshmen students are admitted to the School during the Fall semester only. 

Transfer Admission Requirements. Transfer students who wish to study Architecture must fi rst gai n 
admission to the University and then apply to the LEP at the earliest opportunity following completion of the 
"gateway" requirements. Transfer students, and students enrol led on campus who wish to join the LEP, 
appl y for the same 45 credi 1 1 i mi ted enrol I ment revi ew outl i ned above A dmi ssi on to transfer students i s very 
competi ti ve and vari es from year to year due to I i mi ted space. To meet the provi si ons of the revi ew, transfer 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 126 



students must demonstrate the r ability to compl ete the f ol I owi ng ' ' gateway' ' requi rements: 

• Fundamental Studies requirement 

• Distri buti ve Studi es requi rement 

• ARCH 170, 225, 226, and 242 with a grade of 3.0 or higher i n each course 

• M ATH 220, PH Y S 121 and one of the courses** I i sted bel ow with a mi ni mum grade of 2.0 i n each and an 
overall mini mum grade point average of 2.67 in all three. This guideline typically allows for one grade of 'C-' 
across these three courses. 

** Students must take one of the courses below to compl ete the Mathematics and the Sciences Distributive Studies 
CORE requirement 

• ENSP101 (3) Environmental Science 

• GEOG 140 (3) Coastal Environments 

• GEOL 120 (3) Environmental Geology 

• GEOL 123/METO 123/GEOG 123 (3) Causes and I rrpli cations of Global Change 

• PHY S 122 (4) Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 

Students may be enrol I ed i n A RC H 226 and compl eti ng thei r di stri buti ve studi es contemporaneous wi th the 45 credi t 
I i rri ted enrol I ment revi ew. A mi ni mum cumul ati ve G PA of 3.00 or above i n al I col I ege I evel coursework i s requi red. 
I n addi ti on, the revi ew wi 1 1 i ncl ude an assessment of two I etters of recommendarj ons, transcri pts, an essay, and a 
portfol i o, the nature of whi ch i s specif i ed by the A rchitecture Program PI ease contact the U ndergraduate A rchi tecture 
Advisors at archadvise@umd.edu for a 45 Credit Li rri ted Enrol I ment Review A ppl i cation normal ly available i n 
October pri or to the February submi ssi on. The appl i cati on, detai I ed portfol i o requi rements and deadl i nes are al so 
avai I abl e onl i ne at www.arch. urrd.edu. See the STU DENTS tab for i nf ormati on on Student Aff ai rs. 

N ote M any outstandi ng transfer candi dates appl y i n F ebruary each year. Compl eti on of the above requi rements does 
not guarantee admi ssi on i nto the L i mi ted E nrol I ment Program. 

Appeals Students who are deni ed admi ssi on as a freshman and feel that they have extenuati ng ci rcumstances may 
appeal i n wri ti ng to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons, Mitchell B ui I di ng. Students deni ed admi ssi on at the 45 
CreditLimited Enrollment Review may appeal in writing directly to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs, School of 
A rchi tecture, PI anni ng and Preservarj on. For further i nf ormati on, contact the Counsel or for L i mi ted E nrol I ment 
Programs at 301-314-8385. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements/Degree Options 

I n the f i rst two years of col I ege, di recti y admi tted students and those seeki ng to transfer i nto the School of A rchi tecture, 
PI anni ng and Preservati on shoul d adhere to the f ol I owi ng curri cul um: 

C recite 

General Education and Electi ves 30 

UNIV100 The Students in the University 1 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing 3 

MATH 220 Elementary Calculus I 3 

ARCH170 Introduction to the Bui It Environment 3 

PH Y S121 F undamental s of Physi cs I 4 

ARCH 225 History of World A rchitecture I 3 

ARCH 226 History of World Architecture 1 1 3 

ARCH 242 Drawing I 3 

OnefmmthefolloiMng: 3 
ENSP101 Environmental Science 
GEOG140 Coastal Environments 
GEOL 120 Environmental Geology 



6. The Col I eges and School s 



Page 127 



GEOL 123+ Causes and I mpl i cati ons of Gl obal Change 
PHY S122 Fundamentals of Physics 1 1 

Total Credits 

-+GEOL 123 is also offered as A OSC 123 and as GEOG123 



56 



If admitted after completing 56 credits, students areexpected to completethefdlo^ng requirements for a total 
of 120 credits 



Third Year 

ARCH227 Hi story of World Architecture III 
ARCH400 Architecture Studio I* 
ARCH410 Architectural Technology I 
ARCH401 Architecture Studio 1 1 
ARCH411 Architectural Technology II 
ENGL391 Advanced Composition 
ELECT Directed E I ectives 

General Education Requirements 



Total 



Fourth Year 

ARCH402 Architecture Studio 1 1 1 

ARCH412 Architectural Technology 1 1 1 

ELECT Directed History of Architecture Elective** 

ARCH403 Architecture Studio IV 

ARCH413 Architectural Technology IV 

ELECT Directed El ectives 

General Education Requirements 

Total 
Total Credits 



Credits 

3 
6 
4 
6 
4 
3 
3 
3 
32 

6 

4 

3 

6 

4 

6 

3 

32 

120 



^Courses are to betaken in sequence as indicated by Roman numerals in course titles. 
**Di rected Architecture history courses; 

ARCH 420 H i story of A meri can A rchi tecture 

A RC H 422 Hi story of G reek A rchi tecture 

A RC H 423 H i story of Roman A rchi tecture 

A RC H 433 H i story of Renai ssance A rchi tecture 

ARCH434 History of M odern Architecture 

ARCH 435 H i story of C ontemporary A rchi tecture 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 128 



Advising 

E nteri ng students are advi sed by the U ndergraduate A dvi sons I ocated i n the School 's M ai n Off i ce. A dvi si ng i s 
mandatory for al I undergraduate archi tecture maj ors each semester. Students must meet wi th an academi c advi sor to 
di scuss the r academi c pi an and course sel ecti on. Students can make an appoi ntment for advi si ng onl i ne by vi si ti ng www 
www.arch.umd.edu and clicking on the STUDENTS tab and Advising. Students may also contact the advi sing office 
vi a archadvi se@umd. edu. Wal k-i n appoi ntments may be avai I abl e. Students may use the archadvi se@umd.edu emai I 
at any ti me. Students shoul d al ways i ncl ude the r f ul I name, U I D and contact i nf ormati on i n any emai I correspondence 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

TheArchitectureStudentAssembly represents the student body. Assembly members are elected from undergraduate 
and graduate classes. Representatives attend Faculty Meetings, serve on committees, and organize the Archi tecture 
Program Retrospective at the end of each semester. 

The School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation sponsors a chapter of the A meri can I nstitute of Architecture 
Students (AIAS), the national association for archi tecture students. TheAIAS chapter sponsors a variety of activities 
i ncl udi ng an annual C areer F ai r, B eaux ArtsBall.fieldtrips, conferences, workshops, and other events throughout the 
academic year. 

The E mergi ng G reen B ui I ders i s the student organi zati on dedi cated to promoti ng sustai nabi lity. M embers organi ze 
exhibits, apublic lecture, aseriesof lunchtimetalks, and other activities. 

The University of Maryland chapter of NOMAS is affiliated with the national professional organization NOMA. 
N O M A S i s a group of students from a vari ety of backgrounds pursui ng archi tecture degrees at the undergraduate and 
graduate I evel s, i nterested i n contri buti ng to the U M D School of A rchi tecture, PI anni ng and Preservati on by bui I di ng a 
sense of communi ty based on shared experi ences uni que to our di verse student body. 

USGBC Students'! University of Maryland Chapter of the Uni ted States Green Building Council is a coalition of 
undergraduate and graduate students i ntent on I eami ng about and promoti ng sustai nabl e desi gn and bui I di ng practi ces. 
F ormed i n 2007, the group hosts monthl y meed ngs i n the A rchi tecture B ui I di ng. 

Financial Assistance 

M any f i nanci al awards are offered to freshman upon admi ssi on. A ny questi ons about f i nanci al ai d for freshman admi ts 
shoul d be di rected to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Admi ssi ons and the Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d. 

Each year, the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation offers a number of merit-based scholarships to 
qual i f yi ng undergraduate students. M any are offered to students parti ci pad ng i n study abroad programs. I nterested 
students are encouraged to appl y for these i n earl y Spri ng. I nformati on i s avai I abl e at www.arch. umd.edu. PI ease note 
that most of these schol arshi ps are reserved for students i n the studi o sequence of the program. 
The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers all types of federal, state, and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty of f i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. Freshmen and sophomores are strongly encouraged to visit the OFSA early in their tenure at the University 
of M aryl and to determi ne any schol arshi ps they may be el i gi bl e f or i n the f ol I owi ng years. 

For more information, visit vwuw.fi nancialaid.umd.edu. 

Research Units 

National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education 

1112 Prei nkert Fi el dhouse, Col I ege Park,301-405-6788 

www.smartgrowth.umd.edu 

Dr. GerritKnaap 

The National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education is a non-partisan center for research and leadership 

trai ni ng on Smart G rowth and rel ated I and use i ssues nati onal I y and i nternati onal I y . F ounded i n 2000, the N ati onal 

C enter for Smart G rowth i s a cooperati ve venture of four U ni versi ty of M aryl and school s: A rchi tecture, PI anni ng and 

Preservation; Public Pol icy; Agriculture and Natural Resources; and Engineering. The mission of the Center is to bring 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 129 



the di verse resources of the U ni versi ty of M ary I and and a network of nati onal experts to bear on i ssues i n I and 
devel opment, resource preservati on and urban growth -- the nature of our communi ti es, our I andscape and our qual i ty 
of I i f e - through i nterdi sci pi i nary research, outreach and educati on, thereby establ i shi ng the U ni versi ty as the nati onal 
leader in this field 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES (AGNR) 

0108 Symons Hall, 301-405-2078 

agnr.umd.edu 

eweJss@umd.edu 

Dean: Cheng-i Wei 

Associate Dean(s): Leon H. Slaughter, Nick Place, Adel Shi rmohammadi 

Assistant Dean(s): Evelyn Cooper 

The C ol I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources offers a vari ety of acaderri c programs that appl y sci ence, 

management desi gn, and engi neeri ng to i improve the worl d i n whi ch we I i ve and work. F eedi ng the worl d's popul ati on, 

devel opi ng sci enti f i cal I y- based I and use practi ces and pol i ci es, understand ng ani mal and pi ant bi ol ogy, i mprovi ng 

nutri ti on and i ts effects on human heal th, conservi ng and restori ng ecosystems, and prof i tabl y managi ng farms and 

agri busi nesses i n harmony wi th the envi ronment are al I vi tal concerns of the Col I ege I ntegrati ng the use and protect] on 

of natural resources i n the producti on of food and nursery crops i s a chal I enge faci ng students. 

I n addi ti on to course work, undergraduates have opportuni ti es to work cl osel y wi th f acul ty i n state-of-the- art faci I i ti es 

including those for ani mal sciences, dietetics, environmental sci ence and technology, I andscape architecture, plant 

sci ences, and veteri nary medi ci ne The Col I ege al so serves as the acaderri c home of the M aryl and Campus of the 

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine Nearby resources such as the U.S. Department of 

Agriculture's Beltsvi lie Agricultural National Research Center, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug 

Administration, the Smithsonian Institution and the Nati onal Zoo, Maryland's Departments of Agriculture and Natural 

Resources, and the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center enhance teaching, research, internship, and career opportunities 

for students. Field study courses offered in Azerbaijan, Brazil, Belize, Costa Rica, Italy, Peru, Russia, andTaiwan, and 

a study- abroad program i n A ngers, F ranee expose students to other cul tures and envi ronments. L eami ng opportuni ti es 

are al so strengthened through student i nvol vement i n such co-curri cul ar acti vi ti es as the Col I ege H onors Program, 

AGNR Undergraduate Research Program, career programs, leadership workshops, and student cl ubs. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Educational opportunities i n the Col lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources are enhanced by the proxi rrity of several 
research units of the federal government. Teachi ng and research acti viti es i n the Col I ege are conducted with the 
cooperati on of sci enti sts and prof essi onal peopl e i n government posi ti ons. Of parti cul ar i nterest are the N ati onal 
A gri cul tural Research C enter at B el tsvi 1 1 e, the N ati onal A gri cul tural Li brary , the N ati onal A rboretum and the F ood 
and Drug Administration. 

I nstructi on i n the basi c bi ol ogi cal and soci al sci ences, and I andscape desi gn i s conducted i n modem, 

technol ogi cal I y-equi pped cl assrooms and I aboratori es. The appl i cati on of basi c pri nci pi es to practi cal si tuati ons i s 

demonstrated for the student i n numerous ways. I n addi ti on to on-campus faci I i ti es, the col I ege operates 

several education and research facilities throughout Maryland. Horticultural and agronomic crops, turf, beef, horses, 

dai ry cattl e, and poultry are mai ntai ned under practi cal and research conditi ons and may be used by our students. 

These centers, as we! I as other sel ected I ocati ons on and off campus al so serve as I i vi ng I aboratori es for envi ronmental 

studies. 

Admission Requirements 

I I i s recommended that students enteri ng the Col I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources have compl eted a hi gh 
school preparatory course that includes: English, 4 units; mathematics, 3 units; biological and physical sciences, 3 units; 
and history or social sciences, 2 units. The Landscape Architecture major is a limited enrollment program (LEP). See 
chapter 1 for general I i ni ted-enrol I ment program adrri ssi on pol i ci es. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/Degree Options 

Departments i n the Col lege of Agri culture and N atural Resources offer the fol I owi ng programs of study: 
Agricultural and Resource Economics: Business Management; Agricultural Science 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 130 



Environmental and Resource Pol icy; Food Production; International Agriculture; and Political 
Process. 

Animal Sciences: Animal Care and Management; Equine Studies; Laboratory Animal Care; 
Sci ence/Preprof essi onal ; and A ni mal B i otechnol ogy 

Combined Agriculture/Veterinary Medicine 

Environmental Science and Policy: Environment& Agriculture, Environmental Economics, 
Environmental Restoration, Soil, Water, & Land Resources, and Wildlife Resources & 
Conservation. 

Environmental Science and Technology: Concentrations in Ecological Technology Design, 

Environmental Health, Soil and Watershed Science, or Natural Resources M anagement. 

Plant Sciences: Horticulture and Crop Production, Landscape M anagement, Plant Sciences, 

Turf and Golf Course M anagement, and U rban Forestry 

General Agricultural Sciences 

L andscape Architecture 

Natural Resources Management: Environmental Education/Park Management; Land and 

Water Resource M anagement; and PI ant and Wi I dl if e Resource M anagement 

Nutrition and Food Science: Dietetics; Food Science; and Nutritional Science 

Students graduati ng from the Col I ege must compl ete at I east 120 credits with a grade poi nt average of 2.0 
i n al I courses appl i cabl e toward the degree. Requi rements of the maj or and supporti ng areas are I i sted 
under i ndi vi dual program headi ngs i n the Departments, M aj ors and Programs seed on of thi s si te 



Advising 

Each student in the Col I ege is assigned a faculty advisor to assist in selecting courses, accessing academic enrichment 
opportuni ti es, and maki ng strategi c career deci si ons. A dvi sors normal I y work wi th a I i mi ted number of students and are 
abl e to gi ve i ndi vi dual gui dance. B oth freshmen enteri ng wi th a def i ni te choi ce of curri cul um and transfer students are 
assi gned to departmental advi sors for counsel and pi anni ng of al I acaderri c programs as soon as possi bl e. Students 
have access to addi ti onal advi si ng through the r home departments undergraduate program off i ce and through the 
college's student services office. AGNR Peer Mentors, academically talented and university-engaged upperclassmen, 
provi de an additi onal advi si ng resource for students i n the col I ege. 

Sped f i cs of advi sor assi gnment are avai I abl e i n the undergraduate off i ce of each department 

Departments and Centers 

Undergraduate credit instruction is offered by the Departments of Animal and Avian Sciences (ANSC), Agricultural 
and Resource Economics (AREC), Environmental Science and Technology (ENST), Nutrition and Food Science 
(NFSC), and Plant Science and Landscape A rchitecture(PSLA). Additionally, the Environmental Science and Policy 
(ENSP) maj or i s based and administered within the Col I ege of Agriculture and Natural Resources; itoffers 
specializations advised within this col I ege as well the col I eges of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Chemical, 
Mathematical and Natural Sciences. Also, the Agricultural Science and Technology major within PSLA of fers students 
the opportuni ty to doubl e maj or i n A gri cul ture E ducati on. A ddi ti onal courses are provi ded through the 2-year 
certi f i cate program i n the I nsti tute of A ppl i ed A gri cul ture. 

Minors 

A cademi c M i nors provi de students an opportuni ty to expand or compl ement the r maj or by taki ng addi ti onal courses 
( 15- 24 credi ts) i n a coherent f i el d of study. Students i nterested i n a mi nor shoul d contact the undergraduate program 
of f i ce of the department of f eri ng the rri nor. C urrentl y the f ol I owi ng are approved mi nors ( wi th the of f eri ng department 
i n parentheses) i n the col I ege 

Agribusiness Economics (Agricultural and Resource Economics) 

Environmental Economics and Pol icy (A gri cultural and Resource Economics) 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 131 

Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Development (Agri cultural and Resource Economi cs) 
Global Poverty (Agri cultural and Resource Economics) 
Landscape Management (Plant Science and Landscape Architecture) 
Soil Science (Environmental Science and Technology) 
Sustainability Studies (Environmental Science and Policy) 



Living- Learning Programs 

The col I ege sponsors, through i ts E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy Program, the E nvi ronment, Technol ogy and 
Economy curri cul um i n Col I ege Park Schol ars. Admi ssi on to Col I ege Park Schol ars i s sel ecti ve and by i nvitati on onl y. 
For further i nf ormati on, see U ndergraduate Studi es, Col I ege Park Schol ars Program i n the Col I eges and School s 
seed on of this site. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

The I nstitute of A ppl ied Agriculture offers 60-credit certificate programs designed pri mari ly for professional 
development. Options offered include Agri business Management, Equine Business Management, Golf Course 
Management, Golf Course Construction Management, Landscape Management Ornamental Horticulture, Sports Turf 
M anagement, Sustai nabl e A gri cul ture and Turf grass M anagement. Some two-year program students conti nue on i n 
regul ar four-year programs i n the col I ege and several of the col I ege's maj ors al I ow I i mi ted use of I nsti tute courses i n 
the r programs. 
PreVeterinary Medicine 

The C ol I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources i s the most popul ar choi ce for students who wi sh to pursue 
veteri nary medi ci ne. Two excel I ent maj ors not to be rri ssed are housed i n the Department of A ni mal and A vi an 
Sci ences. The A gri cul tural and V eteri nary M edi ci ne maj or offers a student an accel erated acaderri c path with all 
recommended courses for veteri nary school and the opportuni ty to appl y at the end of the j uni or year. The 
Sci ences/Pre- Prof essi onal maj or offers a student a four year acaderri c path with all recommended courses for 
veteri nary school and the opportuni ty to appl y upon recei pt of the bachel or of sci ence ( B . S .) degree 

College Honors Program 

Students may apply for admission to the College Honors program after completing 60 credits with a minimum 3.2 
G PA i n a program wi thi n the C ol I ege. H onors students work wi th a f acul ty mentor and must take at I east 12 credi ts of 
honors courses i ncl udi ng a seni or thesi s. I nterested students shoul d contact thei r f acul ty advi sor. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Student parti ci pad on i n prof essi onal soci eti es, cl ubs, and i nterest groups i s extensi ve i n the col I ege, and students f i nd 
opportuni ty for vari ed expressi on and growth i n the f ol I owi ng organi zati ons: 

AGNR Peer Mentors; AGNR Student Ambassadors; AGNR Student Counci I ; Alpha Zeta; Alpha Gamma Rho; Animal 
and Avian Sci ences Graduate Student Association; Block and Bridle; Collegiate4-H; Food and Nutrition Club; 
Landscape Architecture Student Association; Natural Resources Management Society; Sigma Alpha; UM Equestrian 
Club; UM Food Science Club; UM Student Chapter of Golf Course Superintendents Association of America; and 
V eteri nary Sci ence C I ub. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of schol arshi ps are avai I abl e for students enrol I ed i n the C ol I ege of A gri cul ture and N atural Resources. 
These i ncl ude 

A G N R A I umni A ssoci ati on Schol arshi p; A G N R G eneral Schol arshi p; A rthur M . A hal t M emori al Schol arshi p; 
Attorney General's Agricultural andNatural Resources Scholarship; ProfessorJohnAxley Memorial Scholarship; 
Eileen Barnett Scholarship; Beltsvi lie Garden Club Scholarship; B ruce and Donna Berl age Scholarship; Chester F. 
Bletch Endowment; Bowie-Crofton Garden Club Scholarship; Frank D. Brown Memorial Scholarship; J oseph Byrd 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 132 



Foundation Scholarship; J onas andj oan Cash Student Award Scholarship; Chapel Valley Landscape Honorary 
Scholarship; George Earl e Cook, Jr. Scholarship; ErnestT. Cull en Memorial Scholarship; J ai me Dannemann 
Scholarship; R.F. DavisMemorial Scholarship; Jerry V. DeBarthe Memorial Scholarship; WilliamR. DeLauder 
Scholarship; FrankJ. DudaTurfgrass Scholarship; MyloS. Downey Memorial Scholarship; Equine Studies 
Scholarship; ExploreAGNR Scholarship; James R. Ferguson Memorial Scholarship; Kenneths. Fowler Memorial 
Endowed Scholarship; ThomasA. Fretz Agriculture and Natural Resources Scholarship; James & Sarah Goddard 
Memorial Scholarship; WilliamD. Godwin Endowed Scholarship; Golf Course Builders of America Association 
F oundati on Schol arshi p; M anasses J . & Susanna J arboe G rove Schol arshi p; Tom H artsock A ni mal M anagement 
Scholarship; H. Pal mar Hopkins Schol arshi p established by CharlesW. Coalejr. & Ellen Kirby Coale; Charles&Judy 
I ager Schol arshi p; L and G rant Schol arshi p; J ames & G ertrude L earner Schol arshi p; Donal d L ei shear I nternati onal 
Travel Schol arshi p; Lee M aj eski e Dai ry Y outh Schol arshi p; M aryl and Greenhouse Growers Associ ati on Schol arshi p; 
James R. & PatriciaM. Miller Outstanding Senior Scholarship; John and Marjorie Moore International Agriculture& 
Natural Resources Student Travel Schol arshi p; J ames and DessieMoxley Scholarship; Paul R. Poffenberger Memorial 
Schol arshi p; J enniferRusso Memorial Scholarship; Ross& Pauline Smith Scholarship; J. Herbert Snyder Educational 
Schol arshi p; Southern States Cooperati ve Schol arshi p; H i ram I . Sti ne M emori al Schol arshi p; T. B . Symons M emori al 
Scholarship; TIC Gums Scholarship; Vansvi lie Farmers Club Scholarship; A. V. Vierhel I er Scholarship; Siegfried 
Weisbergerjr. Memorial Scholarship; Theo& Georgianna Miles Weiss Memorial Scholarship; and the WilliamR. 
Wi nsl ow Schol arshi p. 

The College is privileged to offer additional support in the form of interest-free loans through the Catherine Brinkley 
L oan F und whi ch are avai I abl e to students who are resi dents of M aryl and and progressi ng i n programs wi thi n the 
Col lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources. 

Awards 

The A gri cul ture and N atural Resources A I urmi Chapter provi des recogni ti on each year for the Outstandi ng Seni or i n 
the two-year and four-year programs. 

Research Units 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES) supports research conducted primarily by 120 faculty 
scientists located withinthe College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Faculty use state-of-the-art facilities such as 
a new Research G reenhouse Compl ex and E nvi ronmental Si mul ator, as wel I as 10 off-campus research I ocati ons, for 
research in trie science, business, policy, and practice of agriculture. MAES supports research that benefits consumers 
and producers al i ke; for exampl e, our si gnif i cant focus on the envi ronment protects val uabl e natural resources such as 
the Chesapeake Bay. Undergraduate students also benefit from mentoring by M A ES-supported faculty and instructional 
use of MAES facilities statewide. 

University of Maryland Extension 

The University of Maryland Extension educates citizens in the application of practical, research- based knowledge to 
critical i ssues i n agri cul rural and agri busi ness i ncl udi ng aquacul ture; natural resources and the envi ronment; human 
development, nutrition, diet and health; youth development and 4- H; and family and community leadership. The 
statewi de program i ncl udes more than 180 f acul ty and support staff I ocated i n 23 counti es, the C i ty of B al ti more, four 
regional centers, and the University of Maryland's College Park and Eastern Shore campuses. Inaddition, more than 
15, 000 vol unteers and ci ti zens i n M aryl and gi ve generousl y of thei r ti me and energy. 

Center for Food Safety and Security Systems (C FS*) 

The Center for Food Safety and Security Systems (CFS3) provi des world-class research, education and outreach on 
i ssues rel ated to food and water defense, safety and protecti on. H oused i n the Department of N utri ti on and F ood 
Sci ence, thi s new center wi 1 1 provi de addi ti onal opportuni ty for students to become i nvol ved i n i ssues of si gni f i cance 
for homeland security. For information on CFS3, pi ease see agresearch.umd.edu/CFS3/index.cfmor call 
301-405-0773. 

Harry R. Hughes Center for Agro-Ecology, I nc. 

The Harry R. Hughes Center for Agro-Ecology, Inc. is a private, non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization affi Mated with the 
U ni versity of M aryl and. The Center bri ngs together di verse i nterests from the agri cultural , forestry, and envi ronmental 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 133 



communiti es for the purpose of retai ni ng M aryl and's worki ng I andscapes and the i ndustri es they support whi I e 
protectj ng and i mprovi ng the heal th of the C hesapeake B ay and i ts tri butari es. F or further i nf ormati on see 
agroecol.umd.edu/orcall at 410-827-6202. 

J oint I nstitute For Food Safely and Nutrition 

The J oint I restitute For Food Safety and Nutrition (J I FSA N ), establ i shed between the U S FDA and the University of 
M aryl and i n 1996, is ajointly admi ni stered research and educati on program F or i nf ormati on on J I F SA N , see 
www.j ifsan.umd.edu/ or cal I 301-405-8382. 

Northeastern Regional Aquaculture Center 

The Northeastern Regional Aquaculture Center (NRAC) is one of five Regional Aquaculture Centers established by 
theU. S. Congress for the United States. Funded by theUSDA, and representing 12 states and the District of Columbia, 
N R A C devel ops and sponsors cooperati ve regi onal research and extensi on proj ects i n support of the aquacul ture 
i ndustry i n the northeastern U nited States. For further i nf ormati on see www.nrac.umd.edu/ or cal I 301-405-6085. 



Student E ngagement and Service Units 

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Maryland Campus 

Col lege of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

V al eri e Ragan, D i rector, C enter f or Publ i c and C orporate V eteri nary M edi ci ne 
1202 Gudelsky Veteri nary Center, 301-314-6820 

Email: vragan@umd.edu 

www.vetmed.umd.edu 

The Virginia-Maryland Regional Col lege of Veterinary M edi cine is operated by the University of Maryland and the 

V i rgi ni a Pol ytechni c I nsti tute and State U ni versi ty . E ach year, 30 M aryl and and 50 V i rgi ni a resi dents compri se the 
enteri ng class of a four-year program leadi ng to a Doctor of Veteri nary M edi cine (DVM ). 

The first three years are given at Virginia Polytechnic I nstitute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia. The final 
year of instruction is given at several locations, including the University of Maryland, College Park. 

A student desi ri ng admi ssi on to the col I ege must compl ete the pre- veteri nary requi rements and appl y for admi ssi on to 
the prof essi onal curri cul um A dmi ssi on to thi s program i s competi ti ve, and open to al I M aryl and resi dents. A 1 1 
Mary I and resi dents' applications are processed at the Col I ege of Veterinary Medicine, Maryland Campus, University of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

I nstitute of Applied Agriculture (Two-Year Certificate Program) 

Col I ege of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

Glori Hyman, Director 

2123 Jul I Hall, 301-405-4685 

E-mail: iaa@umd.edu 

www.iaa.umd.edu 

The I nstitute of Applied Agriculture (I AA) awards academic certificates in Agricultural Business Management, Golf 
Course Management, Golf Course Construction Management, Landscape Management, Ornamental Horticulture, 
Sports Turf M anagement, Sustai nabl e Agri culture and Turfgrass M anagement As a two-year program the I AA has a 
separate admi ssi on pol i cy . U pon compl eb on of the program, students are wel come to transfer to the U ni versi ty of 
Maryland, College Park; University of Maryland University College; and other schools. 

F or more i nf ormati on about the I A A , i ts admi ssi ons procedures, and requi rements, contact the I nsti tute of A ppl i ed 
Agriculture, 2123Jull Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2525. 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 134 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

1102 Francis Scott Key Hal 1 , 301-405-2088 
www.arhu.umd.edu 
Dean: BonnieThorntonDill 

The Col I ege of A rts and H umaniti es embraces a heterogeneous group of di sci pi i nes that study human experi ence, 
thought expressi on and creati vi ty . A 1 1 val ue the devel opment of criti cal thi nki ng, f I uent expressi on i n wri ti ng and 
speech, sensitivity to ethical and aesthetic issues, and a complex understanding of history and culture. Departments and 
programs i n A rts and H umani ti es pri ze vi gorous i ntel I ectual debate i n a di verse communi ty . W hi I e they have strong 
i ndi vi dual i denti ti es, they are al so i nvol ved i n i nterdi sci pi i nary studi es. Thus students wi 1 1 f i nd, for exampl e, courses i n 
the Department of E ngl i sh that approach I i terature i n i ts hi stori cal contexts, courses i n the Department of H i story that 
adopt f emi ni st perspecti ves, courses i n the Department of A rt H i story and A rchaeol ogy that study Af ri can politics, and 
soon. 

F urther exampl es of the sped al opportuniti es avai I abl e to students i n thi s ri chl y vari egated col I ege i ncl ude an 
excepti onal vi sual resource center i n A rt H i story and A rchaeol ogy, the E ngl i sh Departments computer- based wri ti ng 
cl assroom and an AT&T F orei gn L anguage C I assroom. A ddi ti onal I y, students may add an i nternati onal experi ence to 
their undergraduate education by participating in an ARHU -sponsored study abroad program in Nice, Beijing, Berlin, 
or Sevi 1 1 a, or an exchange program i n the U ni ted K i ngdom, K orea, or J apan. The educati onal vi stas open to students i n 
the School of M usi c and the School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studi es are enhanced enormousl y by the 
Clarice Smith Center for the Perform ngArts, which houses those departments. Students may also participate in one of 
the College's five living- 1 earning programs: Honors Humanities, Col I ege Park Scholars in the A rts, Digital Cultures and 
C reati vi ty, J i menez- Porter W ri ters' H ouse, and L anguage H ouse (see bel ow) . 



Admission Requirements 

Students wi shi ng to maj or i n one of the creati ve or perf orrri ng arts are encouraged to seek trai ni ng i n the ski 1 1 s 

associ ated wi th such an area pri or to matri cul ati on. Students appl yi ng for entrance to these programs may be requi red to 

auditi on, present si i des, or submit a portfol i o as a part of the adrri ssi on requi rements. 

The Col I ege's Admissi ons Coordi nator serves as a resource and contact person for prospective students i nterested i n 

A rts and H umani ti es degrees, and as a I i ai son to the Of f i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. F or more i nf ormati on about 

admissions to the College, pi ease contact M r. J . Darius Greene, Associate Director at arhu-admit@umd.edu or (301) 

405-2096. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements/Degree Options 

The College of Arts and Humanities offers the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the foil owing fields of study: 

American Studies: www.amstumd.edu 

Arabic Studies: www.arabic.umd.edu 

Art www.art.umd.edu 

Art History and Archeology: www.arthistDry-archaeology.umd.edu 

Central European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies: www.ceres.umd.edu 

C hi nese L anguage and L i terature: www. chi nese. umd.edu 

Classics: www.classics.umd.edu 

Classical Humanities (see a assies) 

Communication: www.comm.umd.edu 

Dance www.tdps.umd.edu 

English Language and Literature www.english.umd.edu 

French Language and Literature www.french.umd.edu 

Germanic Studies: www.german.umd.edu 

Greek (see CI assies) 

History: www.history.umd.edu 

Italian Language and Literature www.italian.umd.edu 

J apanese Language and Literature www.japanese.umd.edu 

J ewish Studies: www.jewishstudies.umd.edu 

Latin (see CI assies) 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 135 



Lati n and Greek (see Classics) 

Linguistics: www.ling.umd.edu 

Music: www.music.umd.edu (Students majoring in Music may pursuea Bachelor of Music degree) 

Persian Studies: www.persian.umd.edu 

Philosophy: www.philosophy.umd.edu 

Romance Languages: www.romancelanguages.umd.edu 

Russian: www.russian.umd.edu 

Spanish and Portuguese www.spanish.umd.edu orwww.portugueseumd.edu 

Theatre www.tdps.umd.edu 

Women's Studies: www.womensstudies.umd.edu 

The College also offers certificate programs in Women's Studies, East Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. 

Major Requirements 

• A 1 1 students must compl ete a program of study consi sti ng of a maj or (a f i el d of concentrati on) and someti mes 
supporti ng courses as sped f i ed by one of the academi c uni ts of the C ol I ege. N o program of study shal I requi re i n 
excess of 60 semester hours. 

• A maj or shal I consi st, i n addi ti on to the I ower-di vi si on departmental prerequi si tes, of 24 to 40 hours, at I east 12 
of which must be in courses numbered 300 or 400 and at least 12 of which must betaken at the University of 
M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

• A maj or program someti mes requi res a secondary f i el d of concentrati on (supporti ng courses) . The nature and 
number of these courses are deterrri ned by the maj or department. 

• No grade I ower than C- may be used to f ul f i 1 1 maj or or supporti ng course requi rements. N o course for the maj or 
or support modul e may be taken Pass-Fai I . 

• Students must earn at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average to graduate from the University of Maryland. 

• An overall GPA of 2.0 in the major is required for graduation. 

• Students shoul d consul t the uni t i n whi ch they wi 1 1 maj or for sped f i c detai I s; certai n uni ts have mandatory 
advising. 



Graduation Requirements 

To graduate, al I students must earn at least 120 credits and at least a ZO cumulative g-ade point average. 
Additionally, students must completeCollegeof Arts and Humanities requirements 

The f ol I owi ng Col I ege requi rements appl y onl y to students eami ng B achel or of A rts degrees from the Col I ege of A rts 
and H umaniti es. These requi rements are i n addi ti on to or i n f ulf i 1 1 ment of campus and departmental requi rements. For 
i nf ormati on concerni ng the B achel or of M usi c i n the School of M usi c, students shoul d consul t a M usi c advi sor. 

Students who double major in ARHU and another col I ege on campus must compl ete the A RHU Global Engagement 
requirement and 45 hours of upper- level credit. 

All A rts and Humanities freshmen (excluding students in Col I ege Park Scholars, Digital Cultures and Creativity, 
H onors H umani ti es, E ntrepreneurshi p and I nnovati on, G emstone, I ntegrated L i f e Sci ences, or U ni versi ty H onors) must 
take UNIV101, The Student in the Uni versify and I ntroducti on to Computer Resources, duri ng the r fi rst semester on 
campus. 

Distribution: To encourage advanced mastery of materi al , a rri ni mum of 45 of the total of 120 semester hours must be 
upper- level work (i .e, courses numbered 300-499). 

For more i nf ormati on about the CORE program, pleasevisitwww.ugst.umd.edu/core/ 

F or more i nf ormati on about the G eneral E ducati on program, pi ease vi si t www. gened. umd. edu/ 

The Global Engagement Requirement 

To expand ARHU students' understandi ng of other cultures and I anguage i n an i ncreasi ngl y gl obal soci ety, ARHU 
students must compl ete the " G I obal E ngagement Requi rement. ' ' L eami ng a second I anguage produces deep knowl edge 
of cul tural as wel I as I i ngui sti c di ff erences whi I e openi ng pathways for common understandi ng. The requi rement may 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 136 



be sati sf i ed i n one of three ways, 

Option 1 Study of a Foreign Language 

Requirement Students wi 1 1 take fore; gn I anguage coursework to the desi gnated I evel at U M D . PI ease consul t an 
A R H U advi sor f or a I i st of the approved course sequences. 

Option Z Ciitural Immersion through Study Abroad 

Requirement Students wi 1 1 parti ci pate i n a semester I ong Study A broad experi ence i n a country where E ngl i sh i s not 
the pri mary I anguage. 

The study abroad experi ence must i ncl ude 

1. At I east the first year/elementary level I anguage of the host country before or during the experi ence (or equivalent 
as determined by the A RHU foreign I anguage placement policy); 

2. A ref I ecti on component that wi 1 1 chal I enge students to assess thei r pre-departure, i n country and post study 
abroad experience (0-3cr); 

3. Parti ci pati on i n one of the f ol I owi ng pre-approved engagement experi ences: 

• Internship 

• Service Learning 

• A living situation involving daily interaction with host nationals (eg., a pre-approved home stay with 
a host nati onal f ami I y) 

• Other - an engagement experi ence approved i n advance of departure 

Students must devel op a I eami ng contract wi th an A RH U advi sor i n advance of studyi ng abroad i n order for the 
experi ence to count for the G I obal E ngagement Requi rement Past study abroad experi ences wi II not be consi dered 
retroactively. 

Option 3: 1 ndvidually-deagned Engagement Experience 

Requirement Students may al so create an i ndi vi dual I y-desi gned experi ence that achi eves the I earni ng outcomes of the 
gl obal engagement requi rement. 

Thi s opti on must i ncl ude 

1. At I east the first year/elementary level I anguage of the host country before or during the experi ence (or equivalent 
as determined by the ARHU foreign language placement policy); 

2. A pre-approved short- or I ong-term study abroad program that has been deemed appropri ate for i ncl usi on i n thi s 
option by ARH U i n conj unction with the Education Abroad Office. 

3. Students must devel op a I earni ng contract wi th an A RH U advi sor and peti ti on to have the experi ence approved i n 
advance 

Students proposi ng study abroad i n an E ngl i sh-speaki ng country must choose to study a I anguage that has si gnif i cance 
to the hi stori cal or current cul ture of the host country. Students wi 1 1 need to research and di scuss the i ntersecti on of the 
chosen I anguage and culture i n the; r petiti on. 

Important notes 

1. Students al ready beyond the requi red I anguage needed to f ul f i 1 1 the G I obal E ngagement Requi rement must 
document thei r I anguage prof i ci ency by taki ng a pi acement exam or equi val ent as determi ned by the A RH U 
f orei gn I anguage pi acement pol i cy. 

2. Students taki ng a f orei gn I anguage cl ass at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and on or after 9/15/2011 wi 1 1 need to take a 
f orei gn I anguage pi acement test. PI ease see an A R H U advi sor for detai I s. 

3. Students seeki ng exempti on from the G I obal E ngagement Requi rement must take the f orei gn I anguage pi acement 
test in an on-campus proctored environment. PI ease see an A RHU advi sor for the proctored exam schedule. 

For more information, pi ease see an advi sor in the A RHU Office of Student Affairs, or call 301-405-2108. 
Advising 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 137 



F reshmen and new transfer students have advi sors i n the Col I ege of A rts and H umaniti es, Off i ce of Student Aff ai rs 
(301-405-2108) who assist them in the selection of courses. Students must see an advisor in the rdepartment for 
assistance i n the selection of courses for the major. All fi rst-year students (both freshmen and transfers), students who 
have compl eted 45- 55 credi ts, and seni ors who have compl eted 90- 100 credi ts have mandatory advi si ng wi th both the 
Col I ege and the department F or further i nf ormati on about advi si ng, students shoul d cal I the A RH U Off i ce of Student 
Affairs, 301-405-2108. 

Internships 

Most departments within Arts and Humanities have well -established internship options. For more information on 
i ntemshi ps taken for academi c credi t students shoul d contact thei r departmental acaderri c advi sor. I ntemshi p credi t i s 
al so avai I abl e di recti y through the C ol I ege for students who have fewer than 60 credi ts, have al ready compl eted an 
i ntemshi p i n thei r maj or, or woul d I i ke to expl ore an area outsi de thei r maj or. Typi cal I y, students must have a 2.5 
GPA. They usually complete an application and the experience usually lasts forafull semester or over the summer. In 
addition to the on-site experience, students will also fulfill an academic component. For assistance in locating an 
i ntemshi p, visit the University Career Center at 3100 Hombake Li brary, South Wi ng or do a search on the websitfyww.G 
www.careers.umd.edu 

Secondary Education Teacher Certification (Grades 7-12) 

A student who wi shes certi f i cati on as a secondary educati on teacher i n a subj ect represented i n thi s col I ege i s 
encouraged to speak wi th an advi sor i n Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj arri n B ui I di ng) to di scuss the di ff erent paths 
avai I abl e for certi fi cati on. A student may pursue secondary teacher certi f i cati on as an undergraduate wi th a doubl e 
maj or i n a content area and secondary educati on, pursue the f i ve-year i ntegrated master's program whi ch al I ows for the 
content maj or as an undergraduate and compl eti on of certi fi cati on and graduate degree requi rements in afifth year, or 
appl y to the one- year i ntensi ve master's pi us certi f i cati on program. 



Departments and Centers 

Academic Computing Services 

1111 Francis Scott Key Hall, 301-405-2104 

www.arhu.umd.edu/tech 

Assistant Dean: Kathleen R. Cavanaugh 

A cademi c C omputi ng Servi ces ( A C S) supports the use of technol ogy by f acul ty, staff, and students i n the C ol I ege of 

A rts and H umani ti es. A CS provi des desktop support servi ces for f acul ty and staff, support for the use of technol ogy to 

support teachi ng and I earni ng, and cl assroom technol ogy support servi ces. 

The Art Gallery 

1202 A rt-Soci ol ogy B ui I di ng 

301-405-2763 

www.artgal I ery.umd.edu 

theartgal I eryumd.wordpress.com 

Di rector: J ohn Shi pman 

The Art Gallery presents exhibitions, lectures, filmseries, residencies, and publications focusing on contemporary art 
and vi sual cul ture Opportuni ti es for museum trai ni ng and arts management experi ence are avai I abl e to students 
through i ntem and work-study positions. 

David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African 
Diaspora 

1214 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-405-6835 

email: driskell center@umd.edu 

www.driskellcenter.umd.edu 

Executive Director: Robert E. Steele 

TheDavidC. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African 

Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park, honors the legacy of David C. Driskell ~ Distinguished 

University Professor Emeritus of Art, Artist, A rt Historian, Collector, and Curator- by preserving the rich heritage of 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 138 



African American visual art and culture Established in 2001, the Center provides an intellectual home for artists, 
museum prof essi onal s, art admi ni strators, and schol ars of col or, broadeni ng the f i el d of Af ri can di aspori c studi es. The 
Driskell Center is committed to collecting, documenting, and presenting African American art as well as replenishing 
and expandi ng the f i el d. 

Consortium on Race* Gender, and Ethnicity (CRGE) 

1208 ColeStudent Activities Bldg., 301-405-2931 
www.crge.umd.edu 
Director: Ruth E. Zambrana 
Assistant Director: Laura A. Logie 

The Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) isaUniversity-wideinitiativepromotingl) intersect] onal 
theory, pedagogy and research, 2) mentori ng and trai ni ng of raci al/ethni c, underrepresented mi nority faculty and 
graduate students, and 3) thoughtful and dynamic interdisciplinary collaboration. CRGE's work explores the 
i ntersecti ons of race, gender, ethni ci ty and other di mensi ons of i nequal i ty as they shape i denti ti es, behavi or and 
compl ex soci al rel ati ons. 

C RG E has become a nati onal I eader i n i nnovati ve i ntersecti onal , i nterdi sci pi i nary research and has worked di I i gentl y to 
become a campus- wi de presence vi a col I oqui um, mentori ng of students and faculty, i nterdi sci pi i nary research studi es, 
research i nterest groups, seed grant fundi ng of j uni or f acul ty , and col I aborati ve partnershi ps wi th other acadeni c 
diversity units at UM. Our work has become crucial tothefulfillmentof theUM mission of achieving excellence in 
di versi ty i n schol arshi p, mentori ng and communi ty outreach and servi ce 

Language Media Services 

1204Jim®iez Hall, 301-405-4925; Fax: 301-314-9752 

Email: langweb@umd.edu 

www. I anguages. umd. edu/l ms 

J anel Brennan-Ti 1 1 mann, I nstructi onal Desi gner 

J eff M aurer, Coordi nator 

L anguage M edi a Servi ces ( L M S) i s a support uni t wi thi n the School of L anguages, L i teratures and C ul tures whi ch 

provi des audi o vi sual equi pment and mul ti medi a support f or SL L C f acul ty, staff and students. L M S provi des f i rst ti er 

support and trai ni ng for f acul ty teachi ng i n the ni ne technol ogy enhanced cl assrooms I ocated i n J i menez H al I and the 

SL L C L anguage Technol ogy C I assroom Servi ces f or SL L C f acul ty i ncl ude equi pment and vi deo/DV D I oan, f orei gn 

I anguage program recordi ng, scanni ng of i nstructi onal materi al s, trai ni ng on equi pment use, tape dupl i cati on and 

conversi on, and di giti zati on of audi o and vi deo materi al s. Servi ces for students i ncl ude suppl ementary cl assroom 

audi otape and digital audi of i I e di stri buti on. Servi ces for non- SL L C f acul ty i ncl ude technol ogy cart and SL L C 

Technol ogy Cl assroom reservati ons for a fee. 

FOLA 

1109 J i m®iez H al 1 , 301-405-4046 

www. I anguages. umd. edu/f ol a 

C oordi nator: N ai me Y aramanogl u 

The F OLA (F orei gn L anguage) Program enabl es qual i f i ed students wi th hi gh moti vati on to acqui re a speaki ng 
knowl edge of a number of f orei gn I anguages not offered i n regul ar campus programs. Whi I e i nstructi on i s basi cal I y 
sel f- di rected, students meet regul ari y wi th a nati ve-speaki ng tutor for practi ce sessi ons to rei nf orce what has al ready 
been covered through the i ndi vi dual use of books and audi o tapes or C Ds. F i nal exarri nati ons are adrri ni stered by 
outsi de exam ners who are sped al i sts i n thei r f i el ds. 



Living-Learning Programs 

Honors Humanities 

1103 Wicorrico Hall, 301-405-6992 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 139 



www. honorshumani ti es. umd. edu 
emai I : honorshumani ti es@umd.edu 
Director: ProfessorVal®ieK. Orlando 



E nteri ng freshmen parti ci pate by i nvi tati on i n H onors H umani ti es, a two-year I i vi ng/l earni ng program H onors 
H umani ti es i s the U ni versi ty of M aryl and's premi er undergraduate program for acaderri cal I y tal ented students who 
have diverse intellectual ambitions in the humanities and arts or a desire to develop their education on a liberal arts 
f oundati on. The program i s organi zed around an i ntegrated and advanced humaniti es curri cul um and a f i nal 
i ndependent research or creati ve proj ect (the K eystone Proj ect) that a student desi gns and executes wi th the gui dance 
of a faculty mentor. H onors H umani ti es provi des students with sti mul ati ng semi nars, I if e-l ong f ri endshi ps, a I i vel y 
home base in Anne Arundel Hall , and opportunities to take advantage of the i ntel lectual , cultural , and artistic riches of 
the Washi ngton, D . C . regi on. U pon compl eti on of the program, students earn an H onors H umani ti es ci tati on, and thi s 
presti gi ous award i s recorded on the r uni versi ty transcri pts. 

College Park Scholars 

C PS i n the A rts: Professor H arol d B urgess 
www.scholars.umd.edu 



The Col I ege of A rts and H umani ti es and U ndergraduate Studi es co- sponsor a cross-di sci pi i nary Col I ege Park Schol ars 
program i n the A rts. Thi s two-year program offers the benef i ts of a smal I col I ege experi ence by provi di ng an exci ti ng 
I i vi ng- 1 earni ng envi ronment where students across acaderri c di sci pi i nes I i ve, work, and study wi th the r peers and 
devel op cl ose ti es wi th f acul ty advi sors. Students parti ci pate i n weekl y col I oqui a and numerous events i ncl udi ng an 
annual student- produced A rts Festival, creative workshops, original performances and special engagements with 
professional artists. 

A rts Schol ars are offered a wi de vari ety of opportuni ti es to see, di scuss and parti ci pate i n vi sual and perf orrri ng arts 
events, expl ore theoreti cal facets of the arts, and appl y thei r tal ents to f arri I i ar as wel I as new forms of creati ve 
expressi on. The A rts Schol ars program seeks to encourage students wi th di verse acaderri c i nterests to thi nk cri ti cal I y 
about the arts and engage i n acti ve I eadershi p and advocacy for the arts throughout thei r acaderri c careers and beyond. 

J im®iez-Porter Writers' House 

0111 Dorchester Hall, 301-405-0671 
www. wri tershouse umd. edu 
Director: J ohnna Schmidt 



TheJim®iez-Porter Writers' House(JPWH) is a living and I earning program open to all majors. The program was 
concei ved and devel oped pri mari I y for upper- di vi si on students, but wi 1 1 consi der appl i cati ons from acaderri cal I y 
tal ented i ncorri ng freshmen who have a sol i d focus on creati ve wri ti ng. L ocated i n Dorchester H al I , the Wri ters' H ouse 
creates a campus- wi de literary center to study creative writi ng especi al ly i n its cross-cultural and multi I i ngual 
di mensi ons. Parti ci pants I i ve i n a cl ose corrmuni ty of students who share an i nterest i n creati ng stori es, poems, pi ays, 
and i magi nati ve non-f i cti on. Students work wi th vi si ti ng wri ters, publ i sh a I i terary magazi ne, attend sped al readi ngs 
and col I oqui a, produce an annual I i terary f esti val , and recei ve notati on upon successful compl eti on of the program 
Class sizes are smal I, and include one- on- one faculty advi sing sessions. Admission to the Writers' Houseis 
competi ti ve, wi th onl y f i f ty to si xty students I i vi ng and wri ti ng together each year. A ppl i cati ons can be obtai ned by 
contacti ng the di rector, or by vi si ti ng www. wri tershouse. umd. edu. F i nal deadl i ne for admi ssi on every year i s M arch 1. 

Digital Cultures and Creativity 

www. honors, umd. edu/D i gi tal C ul tures. php 

Director: Professor Hasan Elahi 

F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease contact: 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 140 



dcc-honors@umd.edu 
Phone 301.405.2866 
Twitter: @umd_dcc 

D i gi tal C ul tures and C read vi ty students are i ndependent thi nkers and probl em sol vers who i magi ne that whi ch does not 
yet exist As atruly interdisciplinary program, DCC challenges traditional divisions of knowledge and expertise. Our 
facul ty and students come from al I areas of study; yet we share a common passi on f or the di gi tal worl d that goes 
beyond any parti cul ar tool or pi atf orm. We strongl y val ue i ncl usi vi ty and we embrace hybri di ty i n both theory and 
practi ce Often weari ng more than one hat at the same ti me, we are archi tects, software desi gners, bi ol ogi sts, 
journalists, economists, artists, activists, engineers, and musicians to name just a few. 

As a living- 1 earning program in the Honors College, DCC students form a close- knit residential community where 
i ntel I ectual exci tement, creati vi ty, and di verse i deas are brought together to expl ore emergi ng technol ogi es and thei r 
i mpact on the worl d through proj ects i n physi cal computi ng, i ntermedi a performance, augmented real ity, bi omappi ng, 
DIY culturejamrring, or participatory media 

The program is an innovative curriculum of 16 credits taken over the first two years with top- notch (and 

technol ogi cal I y sophi sti cated) f acul ty, i ncl udi ng a practi cum that cul rri nates i n a si gni f i cant research proj ect and/or a 

maj or creati ve effort. 

DCC aims to cultivate life long learners and critically engaged thi nkers who will become the makers and doers of 
tomorrow, abl e to expand our noti ons of human potenti al T not merel y technol ogi cal I y but al so soci al I y and creati vel y . 

Language House 

0107 St. M ary's H al 1 , 301-405-6996 
www. I anguages. umd. edu/l h 
Program Director: Dr. Phoenix Liu 
PhoenixL@umd.edu 

The L anguage H ouse I mmersi on Program was thefirst living-l earni ng program on campus for students wi shi ng to 
i mmerse themsel ves i n the study of f orei gn I anguage and cul ture. A total of 101 students I i ve i n one of ten cl usters 
(Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, I tali an, Japanese, Persian, Russian or Spanish), which are housed in 19 
apartments i n St. M ary's H al I . Students must comrri t to speaki ng thei r target I anguage as they prepare meal s, study and 
soci al i ze together, do househol d chores, etc. Faculty Mai sons work wi th students i n each of the I anguage cl usters, and a 
student M entor, a nati ve speaker of the I anguage, assi sts students i n the i mmersi on envi ronment. The goal of I anguage 
i mmersi on i s achi eved through activities organi zed by the nati ve M entors, a I anguage- 1 earni ng computer I ab, an 
audi o- vi sual mul ti - purpose room, and unl i mi ted access to f orei gn news and f i I m programs vi a I nternet 

College Honors Program 

M ost departments in the Col lege of Arts and Humanities offer Departmental Honors Programs (DHP). DHPsare 
upper-di vi si on programs wi thi n the i ndi vi dual academi c uni ts. Students enrol I ed i n Departmental H onors work 
i ndependenti y wi th f acul ty members i n subj ects of sped al i nterest, devel op and deepen thei r research ski 1 1 s, and, i n the 
process, earn an even stronger degree. Students must have a cumul ati ve grade poi nt average of at I east 3.0 to be 
admitted. For further information about individual Departmental Honors Programs and policies, consult with 
departmental advisors. 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES(BSOS) 

2148Tydings Hall, 301-405-1697 
www.bsos.umd.edu 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 141 



bsosadvi si ng@umd.edu 

Dean: J ohn Townshend 

Associ ate Dean(s): Katheri ne Pedro Beardsl ey, Wayne M cl ntosh 

Assistant Dean(s): Ann Holmes, Lucy Miller, KimNickerson 

The Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences is comprised of a diverse group of disciplines and fields of study all of 
whi ch emphasi ze a broad I i beral arts educati on as the f oundati on for understandi ng the envi ronmental , soci al , and 
cultural forces that shape our world. At the heart of the behavioral and social sciences is the attempt to understand 
human bei ngs, both i ndi vi dual I y and i n groups. D i sci pi i nes i n the behavi oral and soci al sci ences use approaches that 
range from the sci enti f i c to the phi I osophi cal , from the experi mental to the theoreti cal . I ntegral to al I the di sci pi i nes, 
however, i s the devel opment and appl i cati on of probl em sol vi ng ski 1 1 s, whi ch i n combi nati on wi th other acaderri c 
ski 1 1 s, enabl e students to thi nk anal yti cal I y and to communi cate cl earl y and persuasi vel y . Students i nterested i n human 
behavi or and i n sol vi ng human and soci al probl ems wi 1 1 f i nd many exci ti ng opportuni ti es through the programs and 
courses offered by the Col I ege of Behavioral and Soci al Sci ences. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements/Deg-ee Options 

• Each student must complete a minimum of 120 hours of credit with at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point 
average C ourses must i ncl ude the credi ts requi red i n the U ni versi ty's general educati on requi rements and the 
sped f i c maj or and supporti ng course and grade requi rements of the programs i n the acaderri c departments 
off eri ng bachel or's degrees. 

• Begi nni ng with students matri culating in Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccal aureate degree, students must have 
have arrini mum C (2.00) cumul ati ve grade poi nt average across al I courses used to sati sfy maj or degree 
requi rements. 

• U pon enteri ng B SOS as a freshman, transfer, or by maj or change, students must compl ete and subrri t a 
graduati on pi an to the col I ege advi si ng off i ce for revi ew and approval . 

• Students i n BSOS must compl ete M ath and Engl ish by 60 credits. 

• Students must compl ete 15 upper I evel credits i n the students f i nal 30 credits. 

• All students are urged to speak with an academic advisor i n the r major and an advisor i n the Col lege Advi si ng 
Off i ce at I east two semesters before graduati on to revi ew the r acaderri c progress and di scuss f i nal graduati on 
requi rements. 

Advising 

The B SOS A dvi si ng Center, I ocated i n 2148 Tydi ngs H al I , coordi nates undergraduate advi si ng and mai ntai ns student 
records for behavi oral and soci al sci ence students. A dvi sors are avai I abl e to provi de i nf ormarj on concerni ng U ni versi ty 
requi rements and regul ati ons, transfer credi t eval uati ons, and other general i nf ormati on about the U ni versi ty by 
appoi ntment from 9: 00 a. m. to 5: 00 p. m. M onday through F ri day. U ndergraduate advi sors for each undergraduate 
maj or are I ocated i n the department off i ces. These advi sors are avai I abl e to assi st students i n sel ecti ng courses and 
educati oral experi ences i n thei r maj or area of study consi stent with maj or requi rements and students' educati oral goal s. 
For additional information pi ease visit www.bsos.umd.edu or call 301-405-1697. 
I nterrupted Degree Policy 

Students not enrol I ed at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and for I ess than f i ve years, and are readmi tted through the Of f i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons may return to thei r ori gi nal maj or i n B SOS ( assurri ng they had not been di srri ssed or 
subj ect to di srri ssal from thei r maj or previ ousl y) . Returni ng students, wi th an absence of I ess than f i ve years, are not 
subj ect to changes i n the requi rements for maj or, general educati on, or benchmarks. 

Students not enrol I ed at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and for more than f i ve years and wi sh to return to a B SOS maj or may 
be subj ect to changes i n requi rements for maj or, general educati on, I i mi ted enrol I ment programs, and benchmarks. I f 
students are readmi tted/rei nstated through the Of f i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons, they shoul d check wi th the B SOS 
Col I ege A dvi sing Office for an eval uati on on the status of their return to their original major. Depending on the length 
of separati on, there may be additi onal coursework to update the ri gor of a student's degree. I f a student di d not I eave 
the U ni veri sty i n good acaderri c standi ng, rei nstatement/readmi ssi on to the U ni versi ty i s not a guarantee that a student 
may return to thei r ori gi nal maj or i n BSOS. 

Departments and Centers 

The col lege is composed of the foil owing departments, each offering a major program that leads to the Bachelor of Arts 
or the B ache! or of Sci ence degree, as appropri ate 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 142 



Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es* 

Department of A nthropol ogy 

Department of Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

Department of Economics 

Department of Geographical Sciences 

Department of Government and Pol i tics 

Department of H eari ng and Speech Sci ences 

Department of Psychol ogy 

Department of Soci ol ogy 

I n addi ti on, the col I ege i s a maj or contri butor to the E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Pol i cy Program and sponsors several 
of its areas of concentrati on. 

*The Department of Af ri can A meri can Studi es al so offers an undergraduate certi f i cate requi ri ng 21 semester hours of 
course work. 

Minors 

Several departments within the Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sci ences sponsor minors. Seeindividual department 
or center websites for more i nf ormarj on. A pproved mi nors i ncl ude 

• B I ack Women's Studi es (Departments of Af ri can A meri can Studi es and Women's Studi es) 

• Geographic I nformation Science (Department of Geographical Sciences) 

• G I obal Studi es (two tracks) : I ntemati onal D evel opment and C onf I i ct M anagement or G I obal Terrori sm 

• H eari ng and Speech Sci ences (Department of H eari ng and Speech Sci ences) 

• I ntemati onal Devel opment and Corf I i ct M anagement (Department of Government and Pol i ti cs) 

• Neuroscience (Departments of Psychology and Biology) 

• Survey M ethodol ogy (J oi nt Program i n Survey M ethodol ogy) 

• Global Terrorism (National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism) 



Living-Learning Programs 

CIVIC US Living and Learning Pro-am 

0107 Somerset H al 1 , 301-405-8759 
Director: Dr. SueBriggs 

CI VI CUS is a two-year living and I earning program in the Col lege of Behavioral andSocial Sciences. Thisacademic 
ci tati on program i s centered on f i ve themes of civil society: citi zenshi p, I eadershi p, communi ty servi ce- 1 earni ng, 
communi ty bui I di ng i n a di verse soci ety, and schol arshi p. 

About 130 diverse and energetic CI VI CUS Associates take a common core of classes, live together in Somerset Hall, 
and parti ci pate i n ci vi c, communi ty servi ce, experi enti al , and other activities and proj ects on and off campus. 

CI VI CUS was founded on the belief that to be engaged members of civil society we have an obligation to be aware of 
the worl d outsi de of the cl assroom and to act upon i ssues that affect the worl d i n whi ch we I i ve. 

Our courses and activities are intricately linked with each other and our communities. CI VI CUS Associates enrich their 
acaderri c work and expl ore career opportuniti es by vol unteeri ng with non-profit organizati ons and governmental 
agenci es and programs, creati ng thei r own community servi ce proj ects, and i nteracfj ng with faculty and community 
leaders. They are among the most i nvol ved students at M aryland. CI VI CUS Associates complete a Capstone i nternship 
on campus or i n the DC metropol itan area as second semester sophomores. 

Selected students from all majors are invited to participate in the CI VI CUS Living and Learning Program when they 
appl y to the uni versi ty as f i rst year students, based on thei r I etters of recommendati on, i nvol vement i n hi gh school and 
the communi ty , adrri ssi ons essays, and acaderri c transcri pts. 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 143 



CI VI CUS looks to i nvite students who wi 1 1 continue to strengthen and broaden the r leadershi p ski I Is withi n the 
U ni versi ty and I ocal communi ti es. 

For more information, pi ease visit www.CIVICUS.umd.edu. 

College Park Scholars; International Studies 

1104 Centrevi MeHall, 301-405-9304 
Faculty Director: Dr. James Glass 

One of twel ve Col I ege Park Schol ars living-l eami ng programs, the I nternati onal Studi es Program bri ngs together 
undergraduate students from a vari ety of di sci pi i nes who share an i nterest i n gl obal i ssues, politics, and events. E ach 
enteri ng cl ass of approxi matel y si xty-f i ve students takes courses together duri ng the freshman and sophomore years. 
The maj ori ty of I nternati onal Studi es Schol ars resi de i n Centrevi Me Hall . 

I nternati onal Studi es was one of the ori gi nal four Col I ege Park Schol ars programs I aunched i n 1994, sponsored by the 
Collegeof Behavioral and Social Sciences (B SOS) and the Department of Government and Politics (GVPT). The 
Faculty Director and the Teaching Assistants all have their roots in the Department of Government and Politics. 

The I nternati onal Studi es Program wel comes students who wi sh to I i ve and I earn together and who have an i nterest i n 
expl ori ng i nternati onal pol i ti cal , economi c, and cul tural i ssues. Our program offers an opportuni ty to bui I d gl obal 
understand ng and gl obal awareness through academi c and experi enti al I eami ng. 

F or more i nf orrnati on, pi ease vi si t www.schol ars. umd. edu/i s/ 

Global Communities 

0119 Dorchester Hall, 301-314-7100 
www.gl obal communi ti es. umd. edu 
gl obal communi ti es@umd.edu 
Di rector: Dr. V i rgi ni a H auf I er 

Global Communities is atwo-year living-learning programsponsored by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
( B SOS) . Students parti ci pate i n a combi nati on of courses, extracurri cul ar opportuni ti es, and resi denti al I i vi ng organi zed 
around the theme of gl obal i zati on, its chal I enges and opportuniti es. The program enri ches student understand ng of the 
causes and consequences of the worl d's i nterconnectedness, and provi des academi c and i ntercul tural ski 1 1 s to hel p them 
address the issues it raises. 

G I obal Communi ti es provi des a f oundati on for a vari ety of academi c maj ors and an entry poi nt to the G I obal Studi es 

M i nors. Students take two three-credi t courses on a theme rel ated to gl obal i zati on i n the rfirst year. These 

i nterdi sci pi i nary courses are desi gned and taught by I eadi ng schol ars i n the soci al sci ences, and expl ore si gni f i cant 

i ssues through si mul ati ons, case studi es, and research. The second year of the program requi res experi enti al I eami ng 

through either a short-term study abroad opportunity, service-l eami ng course, or i ntemshi p. There is a f i nal one-credit 

capstone course i n the second year. U pon compl eti on of the 10- credi t program, students recei ve a notati on on the r 

transcript 

The program recognizes that significant I earning occurs outside the classroom Courses are complemented by regular 
field tripsto museums, i nternati onal organi zati ons, embassi es, and other si tes that take advantage of our I ocati on i n the 
greater Washi ngton, D C area. A vari ety of events and acti vi ti es on campus bri ng the i ssues to I i f e Students from al I 
comers of the worl d I i ve together i n the resi dence hal I , f osteri ng i ntercul tural communi cat on ski 1 1 s and bui I di ng a 
di verse and support ve communi ty . 

Global Communi ties is a selective invitation-only program for entering freshmen. It aims to enrol I a class of 60-75 
students each year. The program seeks academi cal I y strong students who express i nterest i n i nternati onal affai rs, have 
i nternati onal or i ntercul tural experi ence, or si mpl y are open to the ki nd of experi ence we offer. 

F or more i nf orrnati on, pi ease vi si t www.gl obal communi ti es. umd. edu 
Specialized Academic Programs 

Atlantic Coast - Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Alliance for Graduate Education and the 
Professoriate (AC-SBE Alliance) 

Director: KimJ . Nickerson 
301-405-7599 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 144 



knick(5) bsos.umd.edu 
www.acsbe.org 

The AC-SBE Alliance is comprised of the University of M aryland at College Park, the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, Howard University, the University of Florida, and the University of Miami. The goals of the AC-SBE 
Alliance are (1) to increase the number of Underrepresented Minority (URM) students receiving a Ph.D. in SBE 
disciplines, and (2) to increase the number of URMs entering the SBE professoriate. TheAC-SBE Alliance recruits 
and prepares undergraduates to pursue doctoral degrees, assists students in the transition from Bachelor to Ph.D. 
programs, assi sts graduate students i n compl eti ng thei r Ph. D . , and prepares graduate students for success. The Col I ege 
of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSOS) istheleadingbody attheUMD campus for this particular alliance. BSOS 
alsocollaborateswiththeUMCP Graduate School and the University of Maryland System's Promise Alliance for 
Graduate Education and the Professoriate (PROMISE AGEP). Through these relationships, students can participatein 
graduate training seminars and professional development activities. Inaddition, BSOS organizes an annual Summer 
Research I nitiative for undergraduates in order to achieve the goals set by theAC-SBE Alliance 

College Honors Program 

U ndergraduate honors are offered to graduati ng students i n the departments of Af ri can A meri can Studi es, 
Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal J ustice, Economics, Geography, Government and Politics, Psychology, and 
Sociology. 

Dean's L ist. A ny student who has passed at I east 12 hours of academi c work under the regul ar gradi ng method i n the 
precedi ng semester, wi thout f ai I ure of any course, and wi th an overal I average grade of at I east 3.5, wi 1 1 be pi aced on 
the Dean's L i st The Disti ngui shed Dean's L i st consi sts of students who have compl eted successful I y a mi ni mum of 12 
credit hours i n a semester with a 4.0. 

Honor Societies. Students who excel i n thei r academi c di sci pi i ne may be sel ected for membershi p i n an honorary 
soci ety . H onorari es for whi ch students i n B SOS are chosen i ncl ude: 

• Alpha Kappa Delta- Sociology 

• Alpha Phi Sigma-- Criminal Justice 

• Gamma Theta Upsilon - Geography 

• Omicron Delta Epsilon- Economics 

• Pi Sigma Alpha-- Political Sciences 

• Psi Chi - Psychology 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Students who maj or i n the B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences have a wi de range of i nterests. The f ol I owi ng i s a I i st of 
student organi zab ons i n the di sci pi i nes and f i el ds of the B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences: 

• A nthropol ogy Student A ssoci ati on 

• Cri mi nal J ustice Student Associ ati on 

• Economi cs Associ ati on of M aryl and 

• Geography Club 

• M aryl and N eurosci ence Soci ety 

• National Student Speech- Language and Hearing Assoc.(NSSLHA), MD Chapter 

• Pre-Medical Society 

• Soci ol ogy Col I ecti ve 

• The Soci ety of Af ri can A meri can Studi es 

F or more i nf ormati on about these student organi zati ons or starti ng a new student group, pi ease contact the Of f i ce of 
Campus Programs, A del eH. Stamp Student Union, 301-314-7174. 

Financial Assistance 

The col I ege offers several scholarships to its students (see below). Each scholarship has eligibility criteria. Scholarship 
i nf ormati on and appl i cati ons are made avai I abl e each f al I semester. Schol arshi p awards are granted for the f ol I owi ng 
f al I semester. The col I ege offers the f ol I owi ng schol arshi p awards: 

• Murray E. Polakoff Scholarship A ward for Academic Excellence 

• I rv & M i cki Gol dstei n Schol arshi p A ward for Comrri tment to Servi ce 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 145 



• Katheri ne Pedro & Robert S. Beardsl ey Schol arshi p Award for Outstandi ng Leadershi p 

• J ean & Robert Steel e Schol arshi p Award f or F i rst Generati on Students 

• FutureAlurmi Scholarship A ward for Financial Need (60 or more credits) 

• M ontgomery F ami I y Schol arshi p A ward ( I nner C i ty/R ural C ommuni ty) 

F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t www.bsos.umd.edu 

Schol arshi ps are someti mas gi ven at the department I evel . C heck wi th your departmental advi sor or your di rector of 
undergraduate programs for more i nf ormati on regardi ng schol arshi p opportuniti es that may be avai I abl e to you. 

The National Schol arshi p Offi ce at the Uni versity of Maryland provides informati on on nationally competitive 
scholarships at the undergraduate (and graduate) level. For more informati on, pi ease visit www.schol arshi ps.umd.edu 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers all types of federal, state, and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty offi ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For more informati on, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu 

Research Units 

The Col I ege of Behavi oral and Soci al Sci ences sponsors several sped al purpose, col I ege-wi de research centers. These 
centers i ncl ude The Center for Substance A buse Research; The M aryl and Popul ati on Research Center; The N ati onal 
Consorti um for the Study of Terrori sm and Responses to Terrori sm and The Publ i c Safety Trai ni ng and Technol ogy 
Assistance Agency. These interdisciplinary centers often offer internships and a selected number of undergraduate 
research assi stant opportuniti es for i nterested students. These research experi ences offer excel I ent preparati on for 
future graduate study and/or j ob opportuni ti es i n the pri vate and publ i c sectors. A ddi ti onal I y, the col I ege offers 
computi ng servi ces through i ts Off i ce of A cademi c C omputi ng Servi ces. 

Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR) 

4321 Hartwick Rd. Ste. 501, College Park, M D 20740 

301-405-9770 

www.cesar. umd. edu 

Director: Dr. Eric Wish 

Established in 1990, CESAR is a research unit sponsored by the Col lege of Behavioral and Social Sciences. CESAR 

staff gather, anal yze, and di sserni nate ti mel y i nf ormati on on i ssues of substance abuse and moni tor al cohol - and 

drug- use indicatorsthroughoutM aryl and. CESAR aids state and local governments in responding to the problem of 

substance abuse by provi di ng the above-stated i nf ormati on, as wel I as techni cal assi stance and research. F acul ty 

members from across campus are i nvol ved wi th C E SA R- based research, creati ng a center i n whi ch substance abuse 

i ssues are anal yzed from mul ti di sci pi i nary perspecti ves. Students obtai n advanced techni cal trai ni ng and hands-on 

experi ence through the r i nvol vement i n ori gi nal surveys and research. 

Maryland Population Research Center (MPRC) 

0124N ColeStudent Activities Building, Uni versity of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

301-405-6403 

www.popcenter.umd.edu 

Director: Dr. Sandra Hofferth 

The M aryl and Popul ati on Research Center (M PRC) is a multi disci pi i nary center dedi cated to popul ati on- rel ated 

research and housed in the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences (B SOS) at the Uni versity of Maryland, College 

Park. Our pri mary goal i s to draw together I eadi ng schol ars from di verse di sci pi i nes to support, produce, and promote 

popul ati on- rel ated research. 

The cross-disci pi i nary research i nterests of our faculty al low the M PRC to conti nual ly grow and make a unique 

contri buti on to the fi eld of popul ati on studi es. The M PRC's members i ncl ude faculty from the departments of Afri can 

American Studies, Agricultural and Resource Economics, Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal J ustice, 

Economi cs, Farri I y Studi es, Geography, H uman Devel opment, the J oi nt Program i n Survey M ethodol ogy, the School 

of Public Policy, and Sociology. 

National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) 

3300 Symons Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, M D 20742 

301-405-6600 

www.start. umd. edu 

Director: Dr. Gary LaFree 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 146 



TheNational Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terror (START) isaU.S. Department of 
Homeland Security Center of Excellence, tasked by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology 
Directorate with using state-of-the-art theories, methods, and data from the social and behavioral sciences to improve 
understand ng of the ori gi ns, dynami cs, and soci al and psychol ogi cal i mpacts of terrori sm. STA RT, based at the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park, ai ms to provi de ti mel y gui dance on how to di srupt terrori st networks, reduce the 
i nci dence of terrori sm, and enhance the resi I i ence of U .S. soci ety i n the face of the terrori st threat. 

Officeof Academic Computing Services (OACS) 

0221 Lefrak Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 
301-405-1670 
www.oacs. umd. edu 
Director: Dan Navarro 

The Col I ege bel i eves strongly that the study of behavi oral and soci al sci ences shoul d i ncorporate both quantitative and 
computati onal ski 1 1 s. Consequentl y, curri cul a i n most departments requi re some course work i n stab sti cs, quanti tab ve 
research methods, and information technology. The BSOS Office of Academic Compubng Services (OACS) provides 
undergraduate students i n the C ol I ege wi th faci I i ti es to sati sf y a broad range of computer- rel ated needs. OA C S operates 
f i ve 20-seat i nstructi onal computer I abs that offer a wi de vari ety of popul ar software, i ncl udi ng stab sti cal and G I S 
packages. The I abs al so offer col or and bl ack-and- white pri nti ng through the campusopay-f or-pri nt system 

Public Safety, Training and Technology Assistance (PSTTP) 

9001 Edmonston Rd. Ste. 300, Greenbelt, MD 20770 

301-489-1700 

www.hidta.org 

Executive Di rector: Thomas H . Carr 

Established in 1997, PSTTAPcs mission is to partner with clients to solve their most important and complex problems. 
To accompl ish this, PSTTA P provi des the hi ghest qual i ty manageri al , operati onal and techni cal support and trai ni ng to 
combat drug traff i cki ng and drug abuse; reduce vi ol ent cri me; reduce gang acti vi ty; provi de acti on-ori ented cri mi nal 
intelligence support M aryl andcs Department of Public Safety and Correctional Servicecs distributed database 
devel opment; and offer i ntemshi ps and j obs to U ni versi ty students. PSTTA P i s funded enti rel y through research and 
devel opment awards. The f ol I owi ng grant proj ects i 1 1 ustrate the breadth and reach of PSTTA P. 

HIDTA 

The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) funds the Washington/Baltimore High Intensity Drug 
Traff i cki ng A rea ( W/B H I DTA ) Program desi gned to coordi nate drug I aw enforcement treatment and preventi on 
efforts i n Central Maryland, Washington, D.C., Northern Virginia and Richmond areas. This intelligence- led program 
relies on its Investigative Support Center to develop and share actionable, real -time intelligence to all participating 
members and the 27 other H I DTAs nati onwi de Over 700 federal , state and I ocal I aw enforcement agents and off i cers 
work together i n W/B H I DTA task forces to i mpl ement H I DTA as strategy for reduci ng drug traf f i cki ng by targeti ng 
drug traff i cki ng and money I aunderi ng organi zati ons and vi ol ent street gangs. W/B H I DTA treatment servi ces target 
hard-core drug abusers i n the H I DTA regi on usi ng a coerced treatment model . W/B H I DTA preventi on resources focus 
on at- ri sk youth i n B al ti more, N orthern V i rgi ni a and R i chmond by off eri ng af terschool and summer acti vi ti es to the 
most di sadvantaged youth. 

Core Competencies 

The Department of Publ ic Safety and Correctional Services (DPSCS) funds the Core Competencies Proj ect desi gned to 
i mprove servi ces provided by the DPSCS to its customers. These i mprovements are bei ng brought about through five 
major information technology (IT) projects currently underway in the I nformation Technology and Communications 
Division (ITCD). TheselT projects are: Statewide Secure WAN and LAN; Offender Case Management System 
(OCMS); ID Maryland; Offender Case Management System Support Systems and Cri mi nal Justice I nformati on 
Sharing. Each of these proj ects requi res that ITCD devel op additional core competencies in order to devel op, 
i mpl ement and support them. Over the past ten years, the U ni versi ty of M aryl andcs Publ i c Safety Trai ni ng and 
Techni cal A ssi stance Program ( PSTTA P) has assi gned researchers to assi st wi th the desi gn, devel opment, 
i mpl ementati on, and operati onal stabi I i zati on of porti ons of each of these proj ects. 

Prince Georges and Montgomery County Gang Initiative 

ThePrinceGeorgecsand Montgomery County Gang Initiative (PGM CGI) is funded by the Department of J ustice The 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 147 



PGMCGI is a multi-agency, multi-disciplinary, regional approach to combat gang crime An Executive Steering 
Commi ttee composed of executi ves and subj ect matter experts from 11 agenci es meet regul arl y to provi de proj ect 
oversight. Three subcommittees (Suppression, Intelligence and Information Sharing, and Intervention/Prevention) 
col I ect data to eval uate proj ect performance The i nformati on and i ntel I i gence shari ng component faci I i tates an 
i ntel I i gence- 1 ed approach for suppressi on and for gang preventi on/i nterventi on acti vi ti es. 

Technical Assistance in Grant Services (TAGS) 

The Technical Assistance with Grants (TAGS) initiative provides public safety agencies and community organizations 
wi th opportuni ti es to obtai n grant and f oundati on fundi ng they may not have the resources to pursue otherwi se. TA G S 
avai Is its cl i ents of the U ni versi tycs excepti onal appl i ed research resources, expedited procurement procedures, strong 
fiscal management, and its principal so extraordinary practical experience TAGS personnel have the proven capability 
and expertise to handleall of the fiscal responsibilities related to grant implementation for their clients, so that they can 
do what they do bests deliver services that enhance public safety. 

Maryland Coordination and Analysis C enter 

Established in 2003, the M aryland Coordination Analysis Center (M CAC) expanded its mission in 2006 from an 
anti -terrori sm approach to an al I cri mes approach and regi onal i zed efforts by establ i shi ng three Regi onal I nformati on 
C enters. G rant fundi ng awarded to PSTTA P i s used to hi re anal ysts who support I aw enforcement f i re, emergency 
medi cal and response servi ces, publ i c heal th and we! fare, publ i c safety and homel and securi ty agenci es inthis all 
cri mes, al I hazards envi ronment. 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Dean's Student Advisory Council 

The Dean's Student Advisory Council (DSAC) was formed in the fall of 2002. This council is charged with advising 
the dean on vari ous topi cs aff ecti ng students and the r educati onal and soci al experi ences at the U ni versi ty of 
M ary I and. E ach academi c year, the group takes on the responsi bi I i ty of al I ocati ng the col I ege's porti on of the approved 
student technol ogy fee DSA C was assi gned the pri mary rol e of deci di ng where those fees woul d be best appl i ed i n the 
col I ege DSA C al so I ed the charge i n the f ormati on and f oundi ng of the col I ege's A mbassadors Program, whi ch has 
proven to be a successful addi ti on and support system for the col I ege and advi si ng center. 

M ovi ng forward, DSAC plansondevdopirgsysterrstohelpthecollegehaveamorecorrrTiunity-likefeel, and 
creati ng better rel ati onshi ps wi th each academi c department i n hopes of bei ng abl e to better address students' i ssues and 
concerns. During the 2007-2008 academic year, DSAC held its first student-faculty dinner with great successS more 
than 150 students and f acul ty from the col I ege attended the di nner. PI ans are current! y underway for the 
i mpl ementati on of next year's student-f acul ty di nner, whi ch i s an annual event for the col I ege 

Thiscouncil consists of representatives from each department in the Col I ege of Behavioral and Social Sciences, the 
I i vi ng/l earni ng programs i n the col I ege, the Student G overnment A ssoci ati on, U ni versi ty Senate representati ves for the 
col I ege, and a peer advi sor. 

Contact the Dean's Student Advisory Counci I : bsosdsac(cDumd.edu 

BSOS Ambassador s 

A mbassadors assi st with the pi anni ng, coordi nati on and executi on of sped al events hosted by the Col I ege of 
B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences. A mbassadors bui I d a strong knowl edge base of the behavi oral and soci al sci ence 
academi c di sci pi i nes as we! I as other programs offered by the col I ege so that they may i nf orm prospecti ve students and 
the publ i c duri ng sped al events. A ddi ti onal I y, by worki ng wi th other ambassadors, f acul ty , staff and vari ous campus 
prof essi onal s, ambassadors wi 1 1 have the opportuni ty for val uabl e I eadershi p, networki ng and communi cati on 
experience. 

A mbassadors recei ve two (2) course credits for the successful compl eti on of a semester of duty and the f ul f i 1 1 ment of 
the accompani ed course, B SOS288B ) . A ddi ti onal I y, after the successful compl eti on of one semester of duty, students 
may conti nue servi ng as an ambassador and earn addi ti onal credi t for each full semester of servi ce thereafter, assurni ng 
they mai ntai n the necessary requi rements set forth to be a col I ege ambassador. 

For more information contact the Col I ege Advi sing Office 301-405-1697 or bsosadvisingCcDumdedu . 

BSOS Peer Mentors 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 148 



The Peer M entor Program gi ves students an opportuni ty to serve the Col I ege of B ehavi oral and Soci al Sci ences. The 
pri mary rol e of a Peer M entor i s to teach other students about the r degree requi rements duri ng graduati on pi anni ng 
workshops. Students gai n publ i c speaki ng, teachi ng, and I eadershi p ski 1 1 s as wel I as 1-2 credi ts per semester of servi ce 
For more i nformati on contact the Col I ege Advisi ng Off i ce 301-405-1697 or bsosadvising(cDumd,edu . 



THE ROBERT H. SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS(BMGT) 

1570 Van Munching Hall, 301-405-2286 
www. rhsmi th. umd. edu 
undergradi nfo@rhsmith.umd.edu 
Dean: Dr. G. Anandalingam 
Associate Dean(s): Victor M ullins 
Assistant Dean(s): Brian Horick 

The Robert H . Srri th School of B usi ness seeks to provi de the knowl edge and thought I eadershi p that transform students 
i nto agents of both economic prosperity and transformative social change. The Smith School is accredited by AACSB 
International -The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, the premier accrediting agency for 
bachel or's, master's and doctoral degree programs i n busi ness admi ni strati on and accounti ng. www.aacsb.edu . 

A student in the Smith School of Business, selects a major(s) in one of the following curricula: (1) Accounting; (2) 
Finance (3) I nformati on Systems; (4) International Business; (5) Management; (6) Marketing; (7) Operations 
Management; or (8) Supply Chain Management. Upper-division BMGT programs are offered at Col I ege Park and at 
th aJ ni versi ti es at Shady G rove i n M ontgomery County. For detai Is on the majors offered at Shady Grove visit 
www. rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove html . 

Admission Requirements 

See "Admission Requirements and Application Procedures" chapter for general LEP admissions policies. 

Freshman Admission 

Di rect admission to the Smith School is offered on space-avai lable basis to f irst-ti me appl icants who present the most 
competi ti ve academi c records. A 1 1 students admi tted di recti y to B M GT as freshmen must demonstrate sati sf actory 
progress. 

• All students admitted as freshmen must demonstrate satisfactory progress (2.0 GPA or better) plus completion of 
Gateway courses (BM GT 220, BM GT 230, ECON 200 or 201, and MATH 220 or 140 - each with a ni nimum 
grade of "C-" or better) by the semester they reach 45 credits (excluding A P and ESL), at which time they will 
be revi ewed i n order to conti nue i n the B M GT maj or. (N ote Onl y one repeat of one si ngl e course to the set of 
Gateway courses will be accepted to remain in BMGT. Appeals will be considered.) 

• Students must be i n the process of compl eb ng B M GT 221 and ECON 200 or 201 i n the semester i n whi ch they 
reach 60 credits. Students shoul d have compl eted 50% of general educati on program requi rements by the ti me 
they have reached 60 credits. 

Transfer Admission for Students from On or Off Campus 

A 1 1 students appl yi ng for admi ssi on to B M GT as transfer students, whether i nternal transfers al ready enrol I ed at U M C P 
or external transfer students enteri ng the uni versi ty f or the f i rst ti me, wi 1 1 be subj ect to competi ti ve admi ssi on for a 
I i rri ted number of spaces i n the B M GT program at each program I ocati on. I nternal and external transfer students may 
apply to compete for admission to the Smith School of Busi ness after they have earned 45 credits, and if accepted, wi 1 1 
be provi si onal I y admi tted for the semester f ol I owi ng the compl eb on of the r 60th credi t. A drni ssi on wi 1 1 be f i nal i zed 
once al I requi rements are corf i rmed at the end of the f ol I owi ng semester. B el ow are the current admi ssi on standards. 

• Minimum3.0cumulativeGPA( preferred, may vary based upon the appl i cant pool ) 

• M i ni mum j uni or standi ng: 60 credi ts earned 

• Completion of the foil owing Gateway courses, all with "C-" or better: 

BM GT 220 and 221: Accounti ng 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 149 



ECON 200 and 201: M icro and Macro Economics 

ENGL 101 Academe Writing 

MATH 220 or 140: Calculus 

BM GT 230*or BM GT 231#Busi ness Statistics 

* The f ol I owi ng courses are approved substi tutes for B M GT230: B I OM 301, 
ECON321, EDMS451, GEOG305, PSYC2O0, andSOCY201. 

#The fol I owi ng courses are approved substitutes for BM GT 231: EN EE324, 
ENME392, orSTAT400 

• Co-curricular involvement leadership experience and honors and awards will also be considered in the admission 
deci si on. Students are strongl y encouraged to subrri t wi th the r appl i cati ons a resume and I etter detai I i ng the r 
accompl i shments and experi ence. 

• Students may be i n the process of compl eti ng B M GT221 and ECON 200 or 201 i n the semester i n whi ch they 
appl y for admi ssi on but must have successful I y compl eted al I gateway courses by the end of the current 
semester. Students shoul d have compl eted 50% of general educati on program requi rements by the ti me they 
have reached 60 credits. 

Application Deadlines for Transfer Students Compl ete appl i cati ons and al I supporti ng documents must be recei ved 
no later than: 

Fall Semester: March 1st 
J une 15th 
Spri ng Semester: N ovember 1st 

PI ease subiritconrpl eted applications to the Attn: LEP Coordinator, Officeof 'Undergraduate Adnrissions, Mitchell 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-5235. 

F reshmen who begi n study i n another maj or at Col I ege Park who woul d have met the di rect B M GT admi ssi on 
standards from hi gh school have unti I the I ast day of i nstructi on i n the f i rst semester of the r freshmen year at Col I ege 
Park to change the r maj or to B M GT. 

Appeals to this Pol icy: Appealstothis policy may befi led with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, on the 
ground f I oor M i tchel I B ui I di ng. Such appeal s wi 1 1 requi re documentati on of unusual , extenuati ng, or sped al 
circumstances. 

Statement of Pol icy on Transfer of Credit from Community Col leges 

1 1 i s the practi ce of the Smi th School of B usi ness to consi der for transfer from a regi onal I y accredi ted corrmuni ty 
col I ege onl y the fol I owi ng courses i n busi ness admi ni strati on: an i ntroductory busi ness course, busi ness stati sti cs, 
i ntroducti on to computi ng (equi val ent to B M GT 201), or el ementary accounti ng. Thus, i t i s anti ci pated that students 
transf erri ng from another regi onal I y accredi ted i nsti tuti on wi 1 1 have devoted the maj or share of the r academi c effort 
bel ow the j uni or year to the compl eti on of basi c requi rements i n the I i beral arts. A total of 60 semester hours from a 
corrmuni ty col I ege may be appl i ed toward a degree from the Smi th School of B usi ness. 

Other I nstitutions 

The Smith School of Busi ness normal I y accepts transfer credits from regi onal I y accredited four-year i nsti tuti ons. 
J uni or- and seni or- 1 evel busi ness courses are accepted from col I eges accredi ted by the A ssoci ati on to A dvance 
Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Junior- and senior- level busi ness courses from other than 
AACSB-accredited schools are evaluated on a course- by- course basisto determine transferability. 

The Srri th School of B usi ness requi res that at I east 50 percent of the busi ness and management credit hours requi red 
for a busi ness degree be earned at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements'Degree Options 

The university confers the fol I owing degrees: Bachel or of Science (B.S.), M aster of Busi ness Administration (M.B.A.), 
Master of Science (M.S.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). I nf ormati on concerning admission to the M.B. A. orM.S. 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 150 



program i s avai I abl e at www. rhsmi th. umd. edu. 

U ndergraduate Program 

The undergraduate program recogni zes the need for prof essi onal educati on i n busi ness and management based on a 
f oundati on i n the I i beral arts. I n addi ti on, the program's i nternati onal I y i ntegrated curri cul um prepares students to be 
ef f ecti ve and responsi bl e managers i n today's dynami c busi ness envi ronment. 

A student i n busi ness and management sel ects a maj or i n one of several curri cul a: ( 1) A ccounti ng; ( 2) I nf ormati on 
Systems: Specialization Business; (3) Finance (4) General Business; (5) International Business; (6) Operations 
Management; (7) Marketing; (8) Supply Chain Management 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (all curricula) 

At I east 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academi c work requi red for graduati on must be i n busi ness and 
management subj ects. A mi ni mum of 57 hours of the requi red 120 hours must be i n 300- or 400-1 evel courses. I n 
addition to the requirement of an overall cumul ative grade point average of 2.0 (C average) inall university course 
work, al I busi ness maj ors must earn a C- or better i n al I requi red courses, i ncl udi ng Economi cs, M athemati cs, and 
C orrrnuni cati on. B egi nni ng wi th students math culating in Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccal aureate degree, students 
must have a ni ni mum C (2.00) cumul ati ve grade poi nt average across al I courses used to sati sfy maj or degree 
requi rements. E I ecti ves outsi de the curri cul a of the School may be taken i n any department of the uni versi ty, if the 
student has the necessary prerequisites. 

Credits 
Freshman-Sophomore School Requirements 

BMGT110 Intro to the Busi ness Value Chain 3 

BMGT220 Principles of Accounting I 3 

BMGT221 Principles of Accounting 1 1 3 

ECON 200 Pri nci pi es of M i croeconomi cs 4 

ECON 201 Pri nci pi es of M acroeconomi cs 4 

Onefrom 

MATH220 Elementary Calculus I 3 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4 

Onefrom 

BM GT230 Busi ness Statistics 3 

B M GT231 Stati sti cal M ode! s for B usi ness 3 

Onefrom 

COM M 100 Foundations of Speech Communication 3 

COM M 107 Speech Communi cati on 3 

COMM200 Critical Thinking and Speaking 3 

Total 26-27 

J unior- Senior School Requirements 

BMGT301 Introduction to Information Systems 3 

BMGT340 Busi ness Finance 3 

BMGT350 Marketing Pri nci pies and Organization 3 

B M GT364 M anagement and Organi zati onal Theory 3 

BMGT367 Career Search Strategies in Business 1 

BMGT380 Business Law 3 

BMGT391 Leadership in Action 1 

BMGT495 Business Policies 3 

BMGT499 Advanced Topics in Business 1 

ECON Economics- see below 3-6 

Total 24-27 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 151 



E commies Requirements 

3-6 credits of approved upper-level economics courses are required by the Smith School of Business. The specific 
requi rements for each maj or are I i sted wi th the maj ors' sped f i c requi rements. 

Major Requirements 

I n addi ti on to the Srri th School of B usi ness B achel or of Sci ence requi rements I i sted above, general I y another 18-24 
credi ts are requi red for each maj or. See i ndi vi dual maj or I i sti ngs i n chapter 7. 
A Typical Program for the Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Credits 
Freshman Year 

G eneral E ducati on and/or E I ecti ves 6 

ENGL 101 or equivalent 3 

MATH (depending on placement}* 3 

BMGT110 3 

First Semester Total 15 

G eneral E ducati on and/or E I ecti ves 6 

ECON200 4 

COM M 100, 107 or 200 3 

M ATH or B M GT230/231* 3 

Second Semester Total 16 

SophomoreYear 

G eneral E ducati on and/or E I ecti ves 9 

BMGT220 (Prereq Sophomore Standing) 3 

ECON201 4 

Third Semester Total 16 

G eneral E ducati on and/or E I ecti ves 10 

B M GT221 (Prereq BMGT220) 3 

BMGT230or 231 or Elective 3 

Fourth Semester Total 16 

* See Freshman-Sophomore School requirements for appropriate math and statistics courses. 
Advising 

G eneral advi si ng for students admi tted to the Smi th School of B usi ness i s avai I abl e M onday through F ri day i n the 
Office of Undergraduate Programs, 1570 Van Munching Hall, 301-405-2286, undergradinfo@rhsmith.umd.edu. Itis 
recommended that students vi sitthis off i ce each semester to ensure that they are i nf ormed about current requi rements 
and procedures. Transfer students enteri ng the uni versi ty can be advi sed duri ng spri ng, summer, and f al I transfer 
orientation programs. Contact the Orientation Office for further information, 301-314-8217, or visit 
http://www.ori entati on. umd. edu. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

The Smith School offers innovative special programs through its Undergraduate Fellows Program. TheFellows 
program offers a seri es of sped al academi c programs, or tracks, whi ch wi 1 1 create smal I communi ti es of schol ars 
wi thi n the I arger Smi th School communi ty . E ach sped al i zed F el I ows program combi nes opportuni ti es f or acti on 
I earni ng and prof essi onal devel opment wi th ri gorous i n-depth academi c coursework focused on cutti ng edge i ssues 
affecti ng 21st century busi ness. 

Co-curri cular activities are a key component of the Fell ows program Field trips and internships, international study 
tri ps and exchanges, speaker seri es, di nners, retreats and competi ti ons will foster I eadershi p ski 1 1 s and contri bute to 
your personal and prof essi onal growth. A I urmi i nvol vement i s an i mportant aspect of F el I ows programmi ng, wi th 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 152 



Srrithal urmi and corporate partners contri buti ng thei r ti me, tal ents and experi ence through sponsorshi p and 
participation in events and activities. For more information on each of the Smith Fellows Programs pi ease see the 
following information and correspondi ng I i nks. For information on all our Fellows Programs visit 
http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Freshman Fellows The Freshman Fel lows track provides enriched opportunities for al I of our newly admitted Smith 
freshmen students from the moment they step on campus for the new Freshman Fellows Orientation. For more 
information, please visit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Accelerated Finance Fellows The Accelerated Finance Fellows program is designed for freshmen with advanced 
standi ng who are sure they want to pursue a f i nance career. These students are i nterested i n accel erati ng thei r f i nance 
coursework, and i n taki ng addi ti onal f i nance courses - beyond what the maj or requi res. These students have the 
potential to become "star" finance majors, courted by top finance recruiters. The emphasis of this programison 
prepari ng students for a hi gh prof i I e career i n f i nance. F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet rhsmi th. umd. edu 
and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Accounting Teaching Scholars TheAccounting& I nformati on Assurance Department (Al A) offers this special 
program opportunity for undergraduate accounti ng students to serve as di scussi on I eaders and teachi ng assi stents for 
the beginning accounting courses, BMGT220& 221. Accounting teaching scholars earn a yearly stipend (depending 
on hours worked) whi I e revi ewi ng materi al i n preparati on for the C PA exam and practi ci ng organi zati onal and 
del i very ski 1 1 s. A one-credit mentori ng course i s offered to prepare students for thei r rol es as teachi ng assi stents. For 
more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Business Process Fellows Program: The objective of the Business Process Fellows program is to develop excellence 
i n operati ons management. Students wi 1 1 1 earn and practi ce busi ness process methodol ogi es and software tool s used by 
I eadi ng edge compani es and agenci es to desi gn and manage compl ex enterpri ses. F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t 
http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Design and I nnovation in Marketing Fellows: The Desi gn i n M arketi ng Fel I ows Program bri dges the gap between 
marketi ng research and theory and the real i zati on of we! I - desi gned appl i cati ons. The program curri cul um and 
co-curri cul ar acti vi ti es are desi gned to produce busi ness I eaders who can make strategi cal I y sound and creati ve desi gn 
deci si ons. Thi s program i s i ntendedl y i nterdi sci pi i nary, wi th mutual benef i t to be gai ned by col I aborati on between 
marketi ng students and desi gn students i n devel opi ng creati ve busi ness solutions. Formorei nformati on, vi si t 
http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

E merging C FOs: Thi s program i s desi gned for students i nterested i n corporate f i nance and i nvestment banki ng. 1 1 i s 
desi gned to go more i n depth i nto corporate aspects of f i nance, and provi de students with enhanced I eadershi p and 
communi cati on ski 1 1 s. For more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program 
tab. 

E ntrepreneurship Fellows . The E ntrepreneurshi p F el I ows Program bri ngs together tal ented Srri th School students to 
create an entrepreneurial chemistry that will stimulate the creati on and growth of new high- potential enterprises. The 
pri mary goal of the E ntrepreneurshi p F el I ows program i s to have each student parti ci pate i n I aunchi ng a prof i tabl e 
busi ness venture whi I e sti 1 1 in school . Thi s program i s offered sol el y at the Smi th School at Shady G rove campus 
( http://www. rhsrri th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/) . F or more i nformati on on the E ntrepreneurshi p F el I ows 
Program visit http://unet.rhsrnith.umd.edu and click ontheFellows Program tab. 

Financial Services Fellows Thi s program is desi gned for students i nterested i n the f i nanci al servi ces i ndustry, 
i ncl udi ng tradi ti onal banki ng ( I oan of f i cer, personal banki ng of f i cer) and the f i nanci al servi ces i ndustry (f i nanci al 
planners, personal investment managers). For more information, please visit http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu and click on 
the Fel I ows Program tab. 

G lobal Fellows The Smi th G I obal F el I ows program i s desi gned for students who have an i nterest i n the worl das 
peopl e and cul teres, and a desi re to appl y busi ness and I anguage ski 1 1 s to enhanci ng economi c devel opment worl dwi de 
and he! pi ng others succeed. F or more i nformati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows 
Program tab. 

L emma Senbet I nvest m e n t Fund Fellows: Thi s program i s a year- 1 ong, advanced f i nance program avai I abl e to 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 153 



undergraduate f i nance maj ors i n thei r seni or year. Twel ve students are sel ected i n the spri ng of the r j uni or year to 
parti ci pate on the fund, two as portf ol i o managers and ten as equity anal ysts. The program provi des the students wi th 
the opportuni ty to appl y what they have I earned i n F i nance cl asses to actual i nvestment deci si ons, through researchi ng 
real compani es and managi ng a portf ol i o of real money, and through revi ewi ng the resul ts of the deci si ons they make. 
At the end of the year-l ong commitment the Fund members wi 1 1 present thei r performance to Fund donors. For more 
i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet rhsrri th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Private Equity and Venture Capital Clinic: The Private Equity and Venture Capital Clinic (PEVCC) isaprogram 
that provides selected students with the opportunity to serve as Analysts at an actual Private Equity Fund with over 
$50M under management under the supervi si on of Prof essi onal F und managers. F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t 
http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

SCM Fellows The Supply Chain M anagement (SCM ) Fel lows Leadershi p Program offers students a unique 
opportuni ty f or I earning and community building both within theSrrith School and with external SCM professionals. 
B y combi ni ng cl assroom I earni ng wi th opportuni ti es i n the prof essi onal communi ty , SC M F el I ows wi 1 1 have a uni que 
opportunity to bui I d knowl edge of the SCM prof essi on and create a foundati on for a networked career. For more 
i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet rhsrri th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Social I nnovation Fellows: The Soci al I nnovati on Fel I ows program wi 1 1 i rrmerse students i n the process of seeki ng 
i nnovati vesolutionsforsocial transf ormati on through busi ness pri nci pi es and hands- on engagements wi th nonprof i t 
and for- prof i t organi zati ons. Whereas many peopl e i n the past sought to change soci ety through acti vi sm, today 
i ndi vi dual s are creati ng entrepreneuri al ventures that address soci al and envi ronmental i ssues. The program features an 
opti onal i nternshi p and co-curri cul ar programmi ng ai med at devel opi ng ski 1 1 s i n the areas of soci al enterpri se, 
mi crof i nance, marked ng and new medi a. Students I eave the program wi th a deep understandi ng of how to appl y thei r 
busi ness ski 1 1 s toward addressi ng i ssues of soci al and envi ronmental i mportance i n I arge and smal I organi zati ons al i ke. 
F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Quantitative Finance Fellows: The Quantitafj ve F i nance Fel I ows Program (former! y F i nanci al M arkets Fel I ows 
program) i s for students i nterested i n i nvestments, and i n parti cul ar i n I earni ng more about the software and hardware 
used in the financial services industry. For more information, please visithttp://unet.rhsrrith.umd.edu and click on the 
F el I ows Program tab. 

QUEST (Quality Enhancement Systems and Teams): A collaborative partnership with the A. James Clark School of 
Engineering and the Col lege of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, the QUEST program is an innovative 
three-year qual i ty management program wi th a dynami c I earni ng envi ronment. G rounded i n team- based courses I ed by 
an i nterdi scipli nary f acul ty, the program offers students the opportuni ty to study i ntegrati on of qual i ty i n the workpl ace 
whi I e appl yi ng the knowl edge and ski 1 1 -set they have gai ned from thei r maj or i n the f i el d of engi neeri ng, busi ness or 
computer science. For more information, pi ease visit http://unetrtTsrnth.urnd.edu. 

Smith Technology Fel lows ST Fel I ows perform a vari ety of duti es, whi ch may i ncl ude servi ng as teachi ng assi stants 
wi th technol ogy- i ntensi ve cl asses, or as research assi stants, executi ng targeted technol ogy devel opment proj ects for use 
i n i nstructi on or research, assi sti ng f acul ty and others wi th targeted proj ects i nvol vi ng software such as racl e or 
. N ET . Some proj ect assi gnments wi 1 1 requi re experi ence usi ng sped f i c software pi atf orms and wi 1 1 provi de techni cal 
support for courses, assi st f acul ty wi th tutori al s and demonstrafj ons, and assi st student teams i n proj ects. Students 
worki ng on proj ects whi ch requi re specif i c technol ogy ski 1 1 s wi 1 1 be el i gi bl e to attend vendor hands-on trai ni ng 
sessi ons. Proj ects wi 1 1 general I y be def i ned as one semester i n durati on but coul d extend over the academi c year. 
Compensati on for work on proj ects i s $10/hour, with proj ects rangi ng from 200-400 hours, whi ch can be spread over a 
semester or a year. Proj ects may be renewable for additional semesters. For more information, please visit 
http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Sport Management Fellows The Sport M anagement Fel I ows program focuses on the worl dwi de enterpri se of sport 
and the prorri nence of organi zed sports at every I evel i n col I egi ate and prof essi onal sports envi ronments, together wi th 
the si gni f i cance of auxi Mary i ndustri es i n sports apparel and equi pment, tel evi si on contracts and other and 1 1 ary 
products and servi ces. F or more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu and cl i ck on the F el I ows Program 
tab. 

Technology and BusinessTransfbrmation Fellows Program: The Technol ogy & Busi ness Transformation fel I ows 
program ai ms to i denti f y and trai n students who are passi onate about I everagi ng the I atest technol ogi es for busi ness as 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 154 



well as social transformati on. This highly selective Fellows program will provide students the opportunity to interact 
wi th the f acul ty i n smal I cl asses as wel I as col I aborate wi th them on state-of-the art i ndustry and research proj ects. F or 
more i nf ormati on, pi ease vi si t http://unet. rhsmi th. udm eduand cl i ck on the F el I ows Program tab. 

Other Special Programs outside of the Smith School's Fellows Prog-am: In addition, Smith School students can 

i ncorporate other excepti onal rail ti di sci pi i nary I eami ng opportuni ti es as part of the r degree programs. Programs I i ke Col I 

Col lege Park Scholars (i ncl udi ng Business. Society, and the Economy ); Gemstone : and The H i nman Campus 

E ntrepreneurshi p O pportuni ti es ( C E Os) programs j oi n busi ness undergraduates with those from other di sci pi i nes. 

Several of the programs menti oned above were formed through partnershi ps with other col I eges or departments on 

campus. 

College Honors Program 

The Smith School Honors Fel lows program, which is part of the Smith School 's Fel lows Program, offers students with 
superi or academi c achi evements sped al opportuni ti es and resources, i ncl udi ng the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n 
cutrj ng-edge research on busi ness i ssues, and to graduate with honors. Students i n the honors program take thei r 
upper-level BMGT core courses in small, seminar-style honors sections which allow in-depth exploration of business 
topi cs i n marked ng, f i nance, management and organi zati on, busi ness I aw, and pol i cy and strategy. The Srri th School 
H onors Program provi des both a non-thesi s and a thesi s opti on, i n whi ch students work on an ori gi nal research proj ect 
under the supervision of aSmith School faculty member. Admission to the Smith School Honors Program is 
competi ti ve Students are sel ected on the basi s of the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

• Mini mum 3.5 cumul ati ve grade poi nt average 

• Mini mum 45 credit hours earned 

• Compl ebon of al I BM GT pre- requi site courses by the end of Spri ng semester: 

Pri nci pi es of Accounti ng I and 1 1 : BM GT 220 and 221 

Busi ness Statistics: BM GT 230 (or 231) 

Calculus: MATH 220 or 140 

Principles of M icro- and Macro- Economics: ECON 200 and 201 

The appl i cati on to the B M GT H onors program i ncl udes a personal essay and two I etters of recommendati on from 
faculty. The BMGT Honors application can be downloaded fromtheSnith School website 
http://unet. rhsmi th. umd. edu . 

Admission to the Smith School Honors Fel lows Program takes place once a year i n the Spri ng semester. For more 
information, please visit http://unet.rhsmith.umd.edu and click on the Fellows Program tab. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Student Professional Organizations 

Students may choose to associ ate themsel ves wi th one or more prof essi onal organi zati ons offered under the umbrel I a 
organization, Smith Undergraduate Student Association (SUSA). For more details, visit http://unet.rhsrnith.umd.edu 
and cl i ck on the Peopl e tab to access SU SA cl ubs. 

Awards 

Scholarships 

F or detai I s on avai I abl e schol arshi ps, pi ease cl i ck on the schol arshi ps tab at http://unetrhsmith.umd.edu . 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL, AND NATURAL SCIENCES (CMNS) 

2300 Symons H al 1 , 301-405-4906 
www.cmns.umd.edu 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 155 



Dean: J ayanth R. Banavar 

Associate Dean(s): Robert I nf anti no, Daniel Lathrop, Paul Smith 

Assistant Dean(s): Lisa Bradley-Klemko, J oelle Presson 

N ati oral I y and i nterrati oral I y recogni zed for our educati oral programs, research excel I ence, 

distinguished faculty and students, the Col I eqe of Computer, M athemati cal , and N atural Sci ences 

(CMNS) i s a critical educati oral and sci entif i c resource benef iti ng the regi on and the rati on. The 

Col I ege offers every student a hi gh-qual i ty, i nnovati ve, and cross-di sci pi i nary educati oral 

experi ence. Strongl y commi tted to maki ng studi es i n the sci ences avai I abl e to al I , the Col I ege 

actively encourages and supports the recruitment and retention of women and rri nori ties 

underrepresented i n our di sci pi i nes. 

Our students have the opportunity to work closely with faculty members i n state-of-the-art 

laboratories, both on- and off-campus, on some of the most exciti ng problems of modern science and 

mathemati cs. We have devd oped courses to ref I ect the evol vi ng and i ncreasi ngl y i nterdi sci pi i nary 

nature of the sci ences, mathemati cs, and advances i n i nf ormati on technol ogy. Asa new approach to 

undergraduate educati on, multi pi e tracks are offered withi n maj ors, i ncl udi ng tracks for future 

teachers, and tracks with an emphasis on computation. 

Our students participate in the University Honors College College Park Scholars , the Quest 

and Hinman CEOs programs, the Corporate Scholars program departmental honors programs, and 

many other co-curri cul ar opportuni ti es. Students pursue research proj ects i n f acul ty I aboratori es, or 

i n the rich cl uster of federal and private research i restitutions i n proxi rrity to our campus; they apply 

their lab and cl assroom ski 1 1 s through i nternshi ps at area compani es, non-governmental 

organi zati ons, and i n cl i ni cal setti ngs. Excel I ent advi si ng and career servi ces are i n pi ace to gui de our 

students through thei r acaderri c program and faci I itate transiti on to graduate programs and 

professional schools, private-sector employment, and public service careers. Our highly-skilled 

graduates pursue careers i n a great many f i d ds and prof essi ons. 

Admission Requirements 

F reshmen and transfer students i nterested i n appl yi ng for admi ssi on shoul d consul t wi th the general uni versi ty 
admissions information provided in Chapter 1 of this catalog. Admission to some CM NS majors is limited - please 
consult the information in Chapter 1 or the foil owing I ink for information about L i rri ted E nrol I ment P roarams . 
F reshmen consi deri ng a maj or i n a CM N S di sci pi i ne shoul d pursue a hi gh school program of studi es that i ncl udes four 
years of mathemati cs - pref erabl y i ncl udi ng al gebra, geometry, pre-cal cul us, and cal cul us. Students i nterested i n 
pursui ng maj ors i n the I if e sci ences and physi cal sci ences shoul d take two to three courses i n the bi ol ogi cal and physi cal 
sci ences with I aboratory. Students i nterested i n Computer Sci ence are encouraged to take hi gh school computer sci ence 
coursework, i ncl udi ng A P Computer Sci ence i f i t i s avai I abl e. M ath and sci ence courses work at the honors/A P/l B 
I evel i s strongl y encouraged. 

For more information about admissions to the College, pi ease contact the CM NS admissions coordinators below: 

For interest in Biological Sciences, Biochenristry, Cherristry, and Environmental Science and Policy-Biodiversity and 
Conservation majors: Ms. Eden M . Garosi, egarosi@umd.edu, 301-314-8375. 

For interest in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Astronomy, Computer Science Geology, Mathematics, Physics, and 
Physical Sciences majors: Ms. MelissaAffolter, msal3@umd.edu, 301-314-2331. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rements'Deg-ee Options 

PI ease see individual department/major entries in Chapter 7 for specific information about specific undergraduate 
maj or requi rements. 

Advising 

Every student i n the Col I ege i s assi gned an acaderri c advi sor, who may be a f acul ty member or a prof essi onal staff 
member of the C ol I ege or acaderri c department. A dvi sors work wi th students to devel op thei r programs and to ensure 
that they are maki ng requi red progress toward the degree Educati onal and career goal s, acaderri c progress, and 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 156 



pre- regi strati on course pi anni ng are among the topi cs di scussed duri ng advi si ng sessi ons. A dvi sors can al so hel p 
students connect to val uabl e opportuni ti es and resources on- and off-campus. 

A dvi si ng i s mandatory for most C M N S students, and al I are encouraged to take advantage of thi s servi ce. Sped f i c 
i nf ormati on about advi si ng appears on the Col I ege websi te at www.crms, umd,edu/undergraduate/i ndex, htm . 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng careers i n the heal th prof essi ons can f i nd addi ti onal advi si ng support from the 
Reed-Yorke Health Professions Advising Office . 1210 H.I Patterson Hall, 301-405-7805. 

Dep a rt m ents and Centers 

The f ol I owi ng academi c departments del i ver undergraduate courses and degree programs i n CM N S: 

Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science 

Department of Astronomy 

Department of B i ol ogy 

Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Department of C hemi stry and B i ochemi stry 

Department of Computer Science 

Department of Entomology 

Department of Geology 

Department of M athemati cs 

Department of Physics 

U ndergraduates i n C M N S al so parti ci pate i n research and co-curri cul ar acti vi ti es of the research 
programs, i nstitutes, and centers of the col I ege I i sted i n the Research U nits secti on bd ow. 

Majors 

Astronomy 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Science 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Policy- Bi odi versi ty and Conservati on 

Geology 

Mathematics 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Minors 

The Col I ege offers minors in the foil owing areas: Actuarial Mathematics, Astronomy, Atmospheric Chemistry, 
Atmospheric Science, Computer Science, Earth History, Earth Material Properties, Geophysics, Hydrology, 
Mathematics, Meteorology, Physics, Planetary Sci ence, Statistics, and Surf icial Geology. 

Living-Learning Programs 

The Col I ege sponsors several I i vi ng I earni ng programs whi ch offer sped al academi c and co-curri cul ar opportuni ti es to 
participants. 

The new I ntegrated L i f e Sci ences Program (I LS) i n the University Honors College was created to offer students 
enhanced cross-di sci pi i nary trai ni ng i n the I i f e sci ences through an i nnovati ve curri cul um and research and i ntemshi p 
opportunities. The I LS program is directed by Dr. Todd Cooke. CM NS faculty members also also contribute to the 
course of f eri ngs of the Digital Cultures and Creativity honors program that emphasi zes i nterdi sci pi i nary approaches to 
expl ori ng emergi ng technol ogi es and thei r gl obal i mpacts. 
The Col I ege sponsors three programs i n the Col I ege Park Schol ars (CPS) I i vi ng-l earni ng program whi ch draw upon the 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 157 



breadth of the academi c disci pi i nes and faculty experti se i n CM N S. Each of these two-year programs bri ngs students 
together around a common di sci pi i nary focus through courses, serri nars, and experi enti al I earni ng opportuni ties. The 
programs i nspi re students to devel op thei r i nterests and i ntel I ectual capaci ty by bui I di ng a communi ty i n whi ch 
everyone has shared i nterests i n schol arl y pursui ts, i n cl ose contact wi th f acul ty who are worki ng at the forefront of 
thei r fi el ds of experti se 

CP5- Life Sciences 

Director: Dr. Reid Compton 

Assistant Director: Ms. Becky ZoniesKenemuth 

CP5 - Science. Discovery & the Universe 

Co-Directors: Dr. Alan C. Peel and Dr. Neal A. Miller 

Sci ence and G I obal C hanqe 

Di rector: Dr. Thomas R. Holtz, J r. 

Associ ate Di rector: Dr. J ohn M erck, J r. 

Specialized Academe Programs 

An i mportant part of the content of CM NS majors is delivered outside the classroom, with the greatest emphasis being 
on I everagi ng our strength: research. Our students experi ence sci entif i c di scovery f i rst hand, as conceptual I earni ng i n 
cl ass i s i ntegrated and appl i ed. E ach maj or provi des access to a vari ety of research experi ences that wi 1 1 provi de 
opportuni ties to collaborate with faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, graduate, and undergraduate students. Our 
geographi c I ocati on al so offers many uni que opportuni ti es for students to gai n research and i ntemshi p experi ence i n 
federal laboratories and agencies, private companies, and non-governmental organizations. Employers and graduate 
school s I ook for research experi ence i n appl i cants. B e a part of the sci ence di scovery i n C M N S, whi ch pi aces the 
col I ege among the top publ i c and pri vate uni versi ti es worl dwi de M ore i nf ormati on about research opportuni ti es are 
provided on th eCol lege website , and on departmental webpages. 

College Honors Program 

I n addi ti on to our I i vi ng I earni ng programs descri bed above, C M N S departments offer research- i ntensi ve departmental 
honors programs to whi ch students may appl y. B ased on a student's performance i n a mul ti -semester mentored 
research proj ect and defense of a wri tten thesi s, the department may recommend that candi dates recei ve thei r 
bachel or's degree wi th Departmental H onors or Departmental H i gh H onors. Successful compl eti on of departmental 
honors i s recogni zed on a student's di pi oma and transcri pt. Parti ci pati on i n the U ni versi ty H onors Col I ege i s not a 
prerequi si te for parti ci pati on i n departmental honors programs. See i ndi vi dual C M N S department websi tes for more 
information. 

Financial Assistance 

The Col I eae Schol arshi ps page provides a list of scholarships and awards administered at the Col I ege level for 
currentl y enrol I ed students, and i nf ormati on about the appl i cati on process. Students compl ete an el ectroni c appl i cati on 
to be consi dered for al I merit and need-based schol arshi ps admi ni stered by the Col I ege for whi ch they are el i gi bl e The 
annual appl i cati on deadl i ne for schol arshi p appl i cati ons for retumi ng students i s i n M ay. 

See departmental websites for more i nf ormati on about undergraduate schol arshi ps based i n the departments of CM N S. 
The C M N S Corporate Scholars Program provi des qual i f i ed students wi th a summer i nternshi p and a $2,000 
schol arshi p i n the name of thei r host company. Thi s program i s open to al I students who have a maj or I i sted i n the 
col I ege, and who are mai ntai ni ng at I east a 3.0 GPA . 

Awards 

See the C ol I ege websi te for a compl ete I i sti ng of undergraduate schol arshi ps and awards . 
Research Units 

I n addi ti on to our academi c departments, many undergraduate students pursue mentored research proj ects i n the 
Col I ege's research centers and i nstitutes. Contact i nf ormati on for the centers and i nstitutes are provided be! ow. 
I nf ormati on about the scope of research i n the uni t, as we! I as aff i I i ated f acul ty, i s provi ded on the websi te of each 
center or institute 

C enter f or B i oi nf ormati cs and C omputati onal Biol ogy 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 158 



3115 Biomolecular Sciences Building, 301-405-5936 

Acti ng Di rector: M i hai Pop 

C enter f or N anophvsi cs and A dvanced M ateri al s 

0368 Physics Building, 301-405-8285 

Professor and Director: Michael S. Fuhrer 

Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling 

4149 Computer Science I instructional Center, 301-405-0648 

Distinguished University Professor and Director: EitanTadmor 

Earth System Sci ence I nterdi sci pi i nary Center 
5825 University Research Court, 301-405-5599 
Professor and Director: Antonio J . Busalacchi 
I nstitute for Advanced Computer Studi es 

2119 A . V . Wi 1 1 i ams B ui I di ng, 301-405-6722 
Professor and Director: Arritabh Varshney 

I nsti tute for Physi cal Sci ence and Technol ogy 

4211 Computer and Space Sciences Bui Idi ng, 301-405-4814 

Professor and Director: Rajarshi Roy 

Professor and Associate Director: Michael Coplan 

I nsti tute for Research i n E I ectroni cs and A ppl i ed Physi cs 

Energy Research Facility, 301-405-4951 

I nteri m Di rector: Thomas E . M urphy 

I oi nt Quantum I nstitute 

2207 Computer and Space Sciences Bui Idi ng, 301-405-1300 

Professor and Di rector: Steve Rolston 

M arvl and B i ophvsi cs Program 

I nsti tute for Physi cal Sci ence and Technol ogy, 301-405-9307 

Disti ngui shed U ni versity Professor and Di rector: Devaraj an Thi rumal ai 

M arvl and Pathogen Research I nstitute 

3102 Biosci ence Research Building, 301-405-2156 

Professor and Director: David M osser 

M ateri al s Research Sci ence and E ngi neeri ng C enter 

2120 Physics Building, 301-405-8349 
Professor and Di rector: J anice E. Reutt-Robey 

Norbert Wiener Center for Harmonic Analysis and Applications 
2211 Mathematics Building, 301-405-5058 
Professor and Di rector: J ohn J . Benedetto 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

The C ol I ege Student Servi ce Off i ce coordi nates ori entati on and advi si ng servi ces, revi ews dean's excepti ons to pol i cy 
requests, and f i el ds i nqui ri es about academi c regul ati ons, transfer credit revi ew, study abroad, and other undergraduate 
program matters. E ach department i s al so served by an undergraduate program of f i ce whi ch coordi nates departmental 
academic advising 

C M N S Student Servi ces Off i ce 

1300 Symons Hall 

301-405-2080 

cmnsque@umd.edu 

Students i nterested i n pursui ng careers i n the heal th prof essi ons can f i nd addi ti onal advi si ng support from 

the Reed-Y orke H eal th Prof essi ons A dvi si ng Off i ce . 1210 H.J Patterson Hall, 301-405-7805. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) 

1204 B enj ami n B ui I di ng, 301-405-2344 
www.educati on. umd.edu/studenti nf o 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 159 



Dean: Donna L. Wiseman 

Associate Dean(s): Margaret J. McLaughlin 

Assistant Dean(s): Kathleen A. Angeletti 

The Col I ege of Educati on i s a prof essi onal col I ege committed to prepari ng accompl i shed begi nni ng and advanced-l evel 
professionals who can advance the I eami ng and devel opment of thei r students and who are ready to become I eaders i n 
theirfields. The Col I ege seeks to fosterthe I earning and devel opment of PK-16 students through our educator 
preparation programs, leadership, research, advocacy, and partnerships. Educational inequities exist on multiple levels; 
therefore, we ai m to prepare educators wi th the ski 1 1 s and commi tments necessary to ensure equi ty for al I students i n 
the publ i c school s and cl assrooms they wi 1 1 1 ead. 

The col I ege programs prepare educators, counselors, psychologists, administrators, researchers, and educational 
sped al i sts. G raduates work wi th i ndi vi dual s from i nf ancy through adul thood i n school s, communi ty agenci es, col I eges 
and universities. Educational programs are accredited/approved by the foil owing: National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education, Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE), American Psychological Association, 
Council on Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Professions, and Council on Rehabilitation 
E ducati on. A ccredi tati on provi des red procal certi f i cati on wi th most other states that recogni ze nati onal accredi tati on. 
M SDE issues certificates to teach in the public schools of the state I n addition to graduation from an approved 
program, MSDE requires satisfactory scores on the state Praxis licensure exams for certification. Atthetimeof 
graduation, the Col I ege informs MSDE of the graduates' eligibility for certification. Under Maryland law, criminal 
background checks may be requi red and consi dered by M SDE i n the awardi ng of teachi ng certi fi cati on, and by 
empl oyers before granti ng empl oyment i n the teachi ng f i el d. C erti f i cati on may be deni ed or revoked for i ndi vi dual s 
who have been convi cted of cri mes of vi ol ence and/or cri mes agai nstchil dren. A ddi ti onal I y, some M ary I and counti es 
requi re a cri rri nal background check pri or to pi acement i n an i nternshi p. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

Students in the Col I ege of Education have the opportunity to work with an exemplary faculty. Among our ranks are 
nati onal I y known f acul ty researchers who have made si gni f i cant contri buti ons to advanci ng theory and i mprovi ng 
prof essi onal practi ce. I n addi ti on, the C ol I ege's strategi c I ocati on provi des students wi th research opportuni ti es that are 
unparal I el ed. Teacher candi dates can compl ete thei r teachi ng i nternshi p and conduct research i n school di stri cts wi th 
hi ghl y di verse popul ati ons. The regi on al so provi des access to several research I i brari es, government agenci es, 
not-for-profit organizations, and educational associations. 

The Col I ege of Educati on offers many sped al resources and f aci I i ti es to students, faculty, and the community, 
i ncl udi ng the f ol I owi ng centers: 

• The Center for Mathematics Education provi des a mathemati cs I aboratory for undergraduate and graduate 
students. Occasi onal I y there are tutori ng servi ces for chi I dren and adol escents. These servi ces are offered i n 
conj uncti on wi th sped al graduate and undergraduate courses i n el ementary and secondary school mathemati cs. 
Center f acul ty are engaged i n research i n mathemati cs educati on, serve as consul tants to school systems and 

i nstructi onal publ i shers, and provi de i n-servi ce teacher educati on i n additi on to graduate degree programs. 

• The Center for Young Children is part of the I nstitutefor Chi Id Study/Human Development i n the Col lege of 
E ducati on. 1 1 offers a creati ve I earni ng experi ence for chi I dren three, four, and f i ve years ol d whose parents are 
affiliated with the University. The Center engages in chi Id study, curriculum devel opment, and teacher 
preparati on. I ts research and observati on f aci I i ti es are avai I abl e to parents, f acul ty, and other persons concerned 
with the care and educati on of young chi I dren. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to Teacher Education Professional Course Work 

A ppl i cants to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and who have decl ared an i nterest i n educati on are adrri tted to a department i n the 
Col I ege. All maj ors must meet the sel ecti ve admi ssi on requi rements for f ul I adrri ssi on i nto the Col I ege of Educati on i n 
order to enrol I i n the prof essi onal sequence of the teacher educati on degree programs. 

The admi ssi on process i ncl udes three steps: 

1. Pre-Admission Review: Candidates must (1) compl ete the English and math lower-level fundamental studies 
(si x credi ts) wi th a grade of C- or better; (2) earn 45 semester hours wi th an overal I cumul ati ve grade poi nt 
average of at I east 2. 75 on a 4. seal e; (3) compl ete gateway and/or sped al i zati on or maj or requi rements for the 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 160 



program area with a mini mum 2.70 GPA, and earn at least a B i n any Education course identified by the program 
as a sped f i c gateway prerequi si te; (4) subrri t a personal goal statement that i ndi cates an appropri ate corrmi tment 
to professional education; (5) have prior experiences in the education field; (6) submit three letters of 
recommendation/reference (7) receive satisfactory ratings on the Col lege of Education Technical 
Standards/F oundati onal Competenci es (or submi t a si gned copy of the Col I ege of Educati on F oundati onal 
Competencies/Technical Standards Self Assessment if formal evaluations have not yet occurred); (8) submit 
cri mi nal hi story di scl osure statement; and, (9) have passi ng scores on the Praxi s I . 

2. Program Faculty review the appl i cati ons of the candi dates who meet the above criteri a and rate them on si x 
components: (1) overall GPA, (2) GPA in gateway/specialization/major, (3) rating for prior experience, (4) rating 
of recommendations, (5) rating of application essay, and (6) review of Foundational Competencies 

eval uati on/self- report 

3. The faculty sets a minimum cut score for eligibility based upon several factors (eg., instructional resource 
capacity of the prograrrydepartment, Professional Development School [PDS] placement capacity in the 
certification area, availability of high quality mentors in the certification area, work force need in the state, etc.). 
Candi dates meeti ng at I east rri ni mum cut scores are schedul ed for i ntervi ews. Program f acul ty re- ranks 

candi dates based on aggregate scores from the compl ete prof i I e - i . e. , the si x factors i n step 2 pi us the i ntervi ew. 
The hi ghest ranki ng i ndi vi dual s usi ng the aggregate score are offered adrri ssi on. [The total number adrri tted i s 
based on target enrol I ment gui del i nes. ] 

Admission application forms are available in Room 1204 of the Benjamin Building. Only those who are admitted are 
abl e to enrol I i n the prof essi onal educati on sequence. A n overal I grade poi nt average of 2. 75 must be mai ntai ned after 
adrri ssi on to Teacher Educati on to conti nue i n the prof essi onal educati on programs. The program faculty i s abl e to 
recommend sel ected other candi dates for D i screti onary A dmi ssi on based on any of a vari ety of sped al consi derati ons. 
Consult the Student Servi ces Off i ce (Room 1204 Benj ami n B I dg. ) for pol i ci es and procedures regardi ng Di screti onary 
Admission. 

C ri teri a for adrri ssi on to the Teacher E ducati on program appl y to any teacher preparati on program offered by the 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and. Thus, undergraduates desi ri ng a maj or i n musi c or physi cal educati on shoul d appl y to the 
C ol I ege of E ducati on for adrri ssi on to the prof essi onal program i n Teacher E ducati on. I ndi vi dual s who are not enrol I ed 
i n the Col I ege of Educati on but who, through an establ i shed cooperati ve program with another col I ege are prepari ng to 
teach, must meet al I adrri ssi on, schol asti c and curri cul ar requi rements of the Col I ege of Educati on. The courses i n the 
prof essi onal educati on sequence are restri cted to teacher candi dates who are enrol I ed i n an approved teacher 
preparati on program and degree-seeki ng maj ors who have met Col I ege of Educati on requi rements for adrri ssi on and 
retention. 

Gateway Requirements for Early Childhood and Elementary Education Programs 

In order to meet the M aryl and State Department of Education's (MSDE's) institutional performance 
criteria for the Redesign (i.e strong math and science background for early childhood and elementary 
education teacher candidates), prospective majors in these programs need to fulfill additional performance 
criteria. In addition to the requirements for admission to teacher education that are listed above early 
childhood and elementary education majors must satisfy the following gateway requirements: 

1. Completion of a four-credit general education laboratory physical science, a four-credit general 
education laboratory biological science, Elements of Numbers and Operations (MATH 212), and Elements 
of Geometry and Measurement (MATH 213) with a mini mum grade of C- in each class and a 2.7 
cumulative GPA across all four courses. 

2. Completion of L ooking I nside Schools and Classrooms (EDCI 280) or Exploring Teaching in Early 
Childhood (EDHD220) with a grade ofB- or better 

3. Passing scores on the Praxis I: Academic Ski I Is Assessments (Applicants will be requi red to meet the 
individual cut-off scores for each of the three Praxi si assessments. A composite score will not be accepted 
for admission.) 

I n keepi ng with the campus undergraduate adrri ssi ons pol i cy, the Col I ege of Educati on wi 1 1 admit as many freshmen as 
possi bl e as " pre-servi ce' ' educati on maj ors. I nternal and external transfers who have compl eted fewer than 60 credi ts 
and who have not yet met the standards requi red for enrol I ment i n the prof essi onal degree programs al so wi 1 1 be 
adrri tted as ' ' pre-servi ce' ' educati on maj ors. F or di recti y adrri tted freshmen, the above adrri ssi on requi rements wi 1 1 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 161 



serve as the cri teri a for the sophomore ( earl y chi I dhood, el ementary, and sped al educati on) or j uni or (secondary 

educati on) I evel revi ew. F or i nternal and external transfers, these cri teri a make up the " gateway. ' ' Teacher candi dates 

who pass the sophomore/j uni or I evel revi ew or the gateway wi 1 1 be adrri tted i nto the prof essi onal degree programs. 

Transfers with sixty or more credits will be granted permission to enrol I as a pre-service major in educati on, provided 

they have maintained at I east a 2.75 G PA and successfully completed the lower- 1 evel fundamental studies witha 

mi ni mum grade of C- or better. These i ndi vi dual s wi 1 1 be gi ven one semester to meet the requi rements for admi ssi on to 

teacher education. 

Detailed information regarding admi ssi on to the Teacher Education program i ncl udi ng the gateway requi rements for 

E arl y C hi I dhood or E I ementary E ducati on, i s avai I abl e i n the Student Servi ces Off i ce, Room 1204 B enj ami n 

(301-405-2344). 



Undergraduate Degree Requirements/Degree Options 

The Col I ege of Educati on confers the degrees of Bachel or of A rts (B . A .) or Bachel or of Sci ence (B .S.) dependi ng on 
the amount of I i beral arts study i ncl uded i n a parti cul ar degree program M i ni mum requi rements for graduati on are 120 
semester hours. Sped f i c departmental program requi rements for more than the mi ni mum must be f ul f i 1 1 ed. 
I n addi ti on to the uni versi ty 's general educati on requi rements and the sped f i c requi rements for each curri cul um, the 
Col I ege requi res that all majors complete a Foundations of Education course (e.g., EDPS301) and, depending upon the 
teacher educati on maj or, si x to twel ve semester hours of readi ng course requi rements. A grade of C- or better i s 
requi red i n al I pre- prof essi onal and prof essi onal course work requi red for the maj or. A n overal I grade poi nt average of 
2.75 must be maintained after admission to Teacher Education. A grade of S is required in the teaching internship. All 
teacher candi dates are requi red to obtai n satisfactory eval uati ons on the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal 
Competenci es/Techni cal Standards and attai n qual if yi ng scores for the State of M aryl and on the Praxi s I and Praxi s 1 1 
assessments. Detailed i nf ormarj on about the Praxi s assessments i s avai I abl e i n the Student Servi ces Off i ce, Room 1204 
Benjamin. 

E xcepti ons to curri cul ar requi rements and rul es of the C ol I ege of E ducati on must be recommended by the teacher 
candi date's advisor and department chai rperson and approved by the Dean. 

Yearlong I nternship 

The yearl ong i nternshi p, whi ch i s the cul mi nati ng experi ence i n the teacher prepararj on program, takes pi ace i n a 
collaborating school (i.e., partner school, PDS-- Professional Development School). Each teacher candi date's 
i nternshi p wi 1 1 vary accordi ng to the uni que attri butes of the r teacher educati on program AIM nternshi ps wi 1 1 provi de 
teacher candi dates wi th the opportuni ty to i ntegrate theory and practi ce through a comprehensi ve, real i ty- based 
experi ence. The yearl ong i nternshi p i s arranged through the Col I ege of Educati on i n col I aborarj on with the school site 
coordi nators, PDS Coordi nators, and the desi gnated schools i n the partnershi p. 

The yearl ong internship is a full -time commitment. Interference with this responsibility because of employment or 
course work i s strongl y di scouraged. Teacher candi dates assi gned to school s for thi s i nternshi p are responsi bl e for the r 
own transportarj on and I i vi ng arrangements and shoul d be prepared to travel to whi chever school has been assi gned. 
The f i nal semester of the yearl ong i nternshi p requi res a sped al fee. PI ease consul t the course I i sti ngs wi thi n Testudo 
for the current I ab fee. Duri ng the teachi ng i nternshi p, teacher candi dates shoul d be prepared to adhere to the academi c 
schedul e/cal endar for the school system i n whi ch they are pi aced. 

I n order to recei ve a yearl ong i nternshi p pi acement, al I teacher candi dates must make appl i cab on the semester pri or to 
the i nternshi p year. Prospecti ve i nterns must have been adrri tted to Teacher E ducati on and have compl eted al I 
prerequi si tes. Pri or to assi gnment, al I candi dates i n teacher preparati on programs must have: ( 1) mai ntai ned a 
mi ni mum overal I grade poi nt average of at least 2.75 with a rri ni mum grade of "C-" i n every course requi red for the 
maj or; (2) sati sfactori I y compl eted al I other requi red course work i n thei r program; (3) recei ved a f avorabl e 
recommendati on from thei r department; (4) attai ned qual i f yi ng scores for the State of M aryl and on the Praxi s I and 
Praxi s 1 1 assessments; (5) appl i ed f or a year-l ong i nternshi p pi acement through the Col I ege of Educati on duri ng the 
semester pri or to the i nternshi p year; (6) recei ved f avorabl e rati ngs from pri or supervi sed experi ences i n school 
setti ngs; (7) recei ved f avorabl e eval uati ons on the Col I ege of Educati on Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal 
Standards; and(8) submitted a cri mi nal history disclosure statement. Inaddition, state I aw gives the local school to 
whi ch the i ntem i s assi gned the di screti on to requi re a cri mi nal background check pri or to pi acement. E arl y C hi I dhood 
E ducati on maj ors must have a certi f i cate i ndi cati ng freedom from tubercul osi s and proof of i mmuni zati on. 
Note All regi strati ons i n the teachi ng i nternshi p, regardl ess of whether an i ntern wi thdraws or takes a I eave of 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 162 



absence, wi 1 1 be counted as an attempt under the campus repeat pol i cy. Onl y two regi strati ons wi 1 1 beall owed. After 
two regi strati ons, further attempts at the teachi ng i nternshi p must be approved by the department and the school system 
prof essi onal s i nvol ved i n the teacher candi date's i nternshi p experi ence 

College of Education Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards 

A 1 1 candi dates i n the U M prof essi onal preparati on programs are expected to demonstrate that they are prepared to work 
with children and youth in educational settings. This preparation results from the combination of successful completion 
of uni versi ty coursework and f i el d/i nternshi p experi ences and the demonstrati on of i mportant human characteri sti cs 
and di sposi ti ons that al I educators shoul d possess. These characteri sti cs and di sposi ti ons, the Col I ege of Educati on 
Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards, are grouped into seven categories: English Language Competence, 
I nterpersonal Competence, Work and Task Management, Analytic/Reasoning Competencies, Professional Conduct, 
Physical Abilities, and Professional Dispositions. 

Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards serve several important functions, including, but not limited to: (a) 
provi di ng i nf ormati on to those consi deri ng pre K - 12 and communi ty prof essi onal careers that wi 1 1 hel p such 
individuals in their career decision- making; (b) advising applicants of non-academic criteria considered in admissions 
deci si ons made by the U ni versi ty's pre K - 12 and communi ty prof essi onal preparati on programs; ( c) servi ng as the basi s 
for feedback provi ded to candi dates i n these programs regardi ng thei r progress toward mastery of al I program 
obj ecti ves; and (d) servi ng as the basi s for the f i nal assessment of attai nment of graduati on requi rements and 
recommendati on for certi f i cati on. 

Candi dates i n the undergraduate teacher preparati on programs wi 1 1 be requi red to achi eve sati sfactory rati ngs on the 
Collegeof Education Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards (or, if evaluations are not yet avail able, submit a 
College of Education Foundational Competencies/Technical Standards Acknowledgment Form) as part of the College's 
sel ecti ve admi ssi ons revi ew i n the sophomore or j uni or year. Sel f- assessments of candi dates and f acul ty eval uati ons on 
the Foundati onal Competenci es/Techni cal Standards al so wi 1 1 occur duri ng each f i el d/i nternshi p experi ence. Teacher 
candi dates wi 1 1 be moni tored and gi ven feedback throughout the program. At sped f i ed poi nts, they wi 1 1 be noti f i ed of 
i nadequaci es that may prevent them from progressi ng through thei r program. Documentati on and consensus regardi ng 
the teacher candi date's f uncti oni ng wi 1 1 be sought before any acti on i s taken. Candi dates who experi ence def i ci end es i n 
any areas wi 1 1 be encouraged to seek appropri ate prof essi onal hel p from uni versi ty or other sources. I f the probl em 
seems to be beyond remedi ati on, admi ssi on and/or conti nuati on i n the prof essi onal programs, graduati on, or 
recommendati on for certi f i cati on may be deni ed. 

Foundational Competencies/Technical standards may be met with, or without, accommodations. The University 
compl ies with the requi rements of Section 504 of the Rehabi I itation Act and the Americans with Disabi lities Act of 
1990. Therefore, the Col I ege of Educati on wi 1 1 endeavor to make reasonabl e accommodati ons with respect to these 
standards for an appl icant with a disabi I ity who is otherwise qual if ied. For detai I ed i nformati on on the Col I ege of 
Educati on- Foundati onal Competencies/Technical Standards, see www. educati on. unxl.edu/studentirfo/teachercert html. 

L iveText Portfolio Requirement 

The Col I ege recent! y i nsti tuted a new I earni ng el ectroni c portf ol i o and accreditati on management system for its teacher 
preparati on programs. A n acti ve subscri pti on to L i veText i s a requi rement for the courses that compri se the 
prof essi onal educati on curri cul um. Teacher candi dates wi 1 1 be expected to subrri t a number of thei r course and 
portf ol i o assi gnments through L i veText. 

The L i veText account, whi ch can be purchased at the U ni versity Book Center, i s a one-ti me purchase that i s 
comparabl e i n pri ce to the cost of a textbook. These accounts wi 1 1 1 ast f or a f ul I year after graduati on so that educati on 
maj ors can use thei r el ectroni c L i veText portf ol i os i n the j ob seeki ng process. F or more i nformati on about L i veText, 
contact Dr. Kathy Angel etti, Assistant Dean (kangel@ umd.edu). 



Advising 

The Student Servi ces Of f i ce provi des academi c advi si ng for educati on maj ors regardi ng admi ssi on, ori entati on, 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 163 



regi strati on, graduati on, and certi f i cati on. At other ti mes, teacher candi dates who have been adrri tted to the Col I ege of 

Education receive academic advisi ng through the; r program advisors. Advisi ng is mandatory i n the Col lege of 

E ducati on: E ducati on maj ors must be advi sed pri or to regi strati on each semester. Teacher candi dates shoul d consul t 

an advi sor i n thei r academi c program for further i nf ormarj on about the mandatory advi si ng requi rement 

Teacher candi dates are requi red to compl ete an academi c audi t i n the Off i ce of Student Servi ces upon admi ssi on to the 

prof essi onal teacher educafj on degree program. U ndergraduates are expected to compl ete thei r degree program i n a 

ti mel y manner and to adhere to program benchmarks. I nf ormarj on about program benchmarks and four-year pi ans i s 

avai I abl e on the Student Servi ces websi te at http://www.educati on.umd.edu/studenti nf o/underqraduate_i nf o/i ndex.htm 1 . 

Departments and Centers 

The Col I ege i ncl udes a number of centers that offer special resources and faci lities to students, faculty, and the 
community, i ncl udi ng the fol I owi ng: 

Center for Chi I dren, Re! ati onshi ps and Culture 

Center for E ducati on Pol i cy and Leadershi p 

Center for I ntegrated Latent Vari abl e Research (CI LVR) 

Center for Literacy, Language, and Culture 

Center for M athemarj cs E ducati on 

C enter for Y oung C hi I dren 

I nsfj tute for the Study of Excepti onal C hi I dren and Y outh 

International Center for Transcultural Education 

M aryland Assessment Research Center for Education Success (M ARCES) 

M aryland Engl ish I nstitute 

M ary I and I nsti tute forMinorityAchi evement and U rban E ducati on 

Sci ence Teachi ng Center 

Researchers from the Col I ege of Education also will be studying the neural basis of language, emotion and thought in 
the new campus B rai n I magi ng Center. The centerpi ece of thi s center wi 1 1 be a new f uncti onal magneti c resonance 
i magi ng or f M Rl scanner. Thi s new center wi 1 1 al I ow uni que research to be conducted, i ncl udi ng exami ni ng brai n 
activity aschil dren I earn to read and understand word meani ngs, and di scoveri ng brai n areas i n chi I dren that are 
acrj vated duri ng soci al acceptance or rej ecti on. 



Minors 

The College of Education offers five minors: 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 164 



1. The M i nor i n Secondary Educati on i ncl udes 15 credi ts and provi des opportuni ti es for undergraduate subj ect area 
maj ors to enrol Una sequence of educati on courses that hel ps them to deterrri ne i f teachi ng i s a vi abl e career opti on for 
them. For more i nformati on about the secondary educati on mi nor, contact the program advisor, 1204 Benj ami n 
Building. 

2. The M i nor i n Second Language Educati on (TESOL ) provi des opportuni ti es for undergraduate subj ect area maj ors to 
compl ete a sequence of courses that hel ps them prepare for careers as teachers of E ngl i sh as a second I anguage i n U S 
school s and/or prepares them for rol es as teachers of E ngl i sh as a f orei gn I anguage i n i nternati onal setti ngs. 1 1 i ncl udes 
coursework from Curriculum and Instruction and from Human Development. For more information about theTESOL 
mi nor, contact the program advi sor, 1204 B enj ami n B ui I di ng . 

3. The Mi nor in Special Educati on provi des opportuni ties for undergraduates to enrol I in a sequence of education 
courses to determi ne i f worki ng wi th students wi th di sabi I i ti es i s a vi abl e career opti on. F or i ndi vi dual s who are 

i nterested i n pursui ng thi s career opti on, a one-year M.Ed, program, I eadi ng to certi f i cati on as a sped al educator, i s 
also available. The minor is under review. For more information aboutthe 18- credit special education minor, contact 
the Off i ce of Student Servi ces, 1204 Benj arri n B ui I di ng. 

4. The M i nor i n H uman Devel opment provi des a ri gorous f oundati on i n human devel opment for undergraduates who 
wi sh to support the r maj or f i el d of study wi th knowl edge of human growth and devel opment across mul ti pi e domai ns 
and devel opmental stages, as wel I as knowl edge rel ated to pri nci pi es of teachi ng and I eami ng, and/or who desi re acti ve 
parti ci pati on i n human devel opment research under the supervi si on of H uman Devel opment f acul ty in I aboratory 
settings. Contact the Human Development undergraduate minor advisor, Ms. Eileen Kramer, at ekramer@umd.edu or 
301-405-8432 for more i nformati on or to arrange an advi si ng appoi ntment. 

5. The E DC P M i nor i n L eadershi p Studi es promotes col I ege student I eadershi p devel opment by educati ng 
undergraduate studentsfor and about I eadershi p i n a compl ex worl d. The goal of the rri nor i s to prepare students to 
serve effectively informal and informal leadership roles in campus, local, national, and global contexts. Faculty and 
students i n the rri nor are dedi cated to advanci ng trie f i el d of I eadershi p studi es by bui I di ng upon and cri ti cal I y 

eval uati ng exi sti ng theoreti cal , research- based, and practi cal knowl edge F or the I i st of approved courses and 
additional detai I s regarding the EDCP Mi nor in Leadership Studies, please visit 
www. educati on. umd. edu/edcp/l eadershi p. 

Specialized Academic Programs 

Secondary Education Pro-am Options The Col I ege of Education has multiple pathways for individuals who are 
i nterested i n teachi ng at the secondary I eve! : 

The Dual Major option, which is designed for incoming freshmen or sophomores, leads to the Bachelor's degree with 
a maj or i n an acaderri c content area pi us a second maj or i n secondary educati on. A 1 1 secondary maj ors are requi red to 
have an acaderri c content maj or whi ch sati sf i es the requi rements of the acaderri c department and meets the standards 
for teacher certi fi cati on. Candi dates who f ol I ow the proposed sequenci ng of courses can compl ete both maj ors i n four 
years with careful advi sement and schedul i ng. 

The Certificate Program requires completion of an academic major - including coursework specific to meet 
certi f i cati on standards i n the certi f i cate area - and a bachel or's degree i n an approved acaderri c content area, pi us the 
compl eti on of a certi f i cate program i n secondary educati on to meet requi rements i n U M 's approved program f or M SDE 
certi f i cati on. Sel ected coursework from the M i nor i n Secondary E ducati on may be taken pri or to adrri ssi on to the 
Certificate Program option. (The Certificate Program is currently under review. For additional information, contact 
the Office of Student Services, 1204 Benjamin.) 

The Five-Year Integrated Master's with Certification Program for content majors entering the junior or senior 
year, i s f or tal ented undergraduates witharrinimumGPAof3.0 who seek to combi ne undergraduate studi es i n the 
content area and professi onal educati on as a foundation for a focused professi onal year at the graduate I evel I eadi ng to 
secondary- 1 evel certi fi cati on i n the subj ect f i el d and the M aster's of Educati on degree. Candi dates who are admitted to 
the program compl ete thei r baccal aureate degrees with a maj or i n the rel evant content area and a rri ni mum of 12 
credi ts i n professi onal educati on studi es rel ated to teacher certi fi cati on requi rements. I n thei rfifth year, they enrol Una 
full -year i nternshi p and compl ete graduate- 1 evel professi onal studi es that make them el i gi bl e f or teacher certi fi cati on 
and the master's of educati on degree. 

F or detai I ed i nformati on about these secondary educati on program opti ons, contact the Off i ce of Student Servi ces, 
1204 Benj ami n Bui I di ng. 

College Honors Program 

U ndergraduate teacher educati on maj ors meed ng certai n schol asti c requi rements may parti ci pate i n the Col I ege of 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 165 



Educati on H onors Program The obj ecti ve of thi s program i s to exami ne the f i el d of educati on at I eve! s of depth and 
breadth that go beyond that provi ded by any one teacher preparati on sequence. The program consi sts of three 
components: group, cross-di sci pi i nary, and i ndi vi dual study. The H onors Program represents an excel I ent spri ngboard 
for teacher candi dates with aspi rati ons to go on to graduate school . For further i nformation contact Dr. Christy Corbi n, 
1117H Benjarrin Building, 301-405-7793. 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Col lege sponsors chapters of Phi Delta Kappa; the Teacher Education Association of M aryland Students 
(TEAMS), a state/national education association; the College of Education Student Assembly, a student governance 
organizati on; and Kappa Delta Pi , an honor soci ety i n educati on. The M ary M cLeod Bethune Soci ety is a 
pre- prof essi onal organi zati on concerned wi th mi nori ty i ssues and educati on. Student E ducators of Y oung C hi I dren 
( SE Y C ) i s a student organi zati on sponsored by the M aryl and A ssoci ati on for the E ducati on of Y oung C hi I dren 
(MDAEYC), an affiliate of the National Associ ati on f or the Educati on of Young Chi I dren (N A EYC). A chapter of the 
Council for Exceptional Chi I dren is open to teacher candi dates in Special Education. 

The PI an of Organi zati on for the Col I ege of Educati on cal I s for undergraduate student representati on on both the Col I ege 
Collegeof Education Assembly and Col I ege Senate. These organi zati ons assume a critical rolein policy development 
for the Col I ege of Education. The Assembly meets at I east once a year during the fall semester for its annual meeting. 
Senate meed ngs typi cal I y occur once a month duri ng the f al I and spri ng semesters. N i ne f ul I -ti me undergraduates are 
elected as voting members of the Col lege Assembly. At least two representatives from each of the departments with 
undergraduate maj ors serve on the A ssembl y . The chai r of the U ndergraduate Student A ssembl y al so serves as a 
voti ng member of the Col I ege of Educati on Assembl y. Of the ni ne Assembl y members, one i s el ected to serve as a 
del egate to the C ol I ege of Educati on Senate. F or f urther i nf ormati on about the Col I ege A ssembl y or Senate, contact 
the Off i ce of Student Servi ces, Room 1204 Benj ami n. 

I n several departments there are i nf ormal organi zati ons of students. Students shoul d contact the i ndi vi dual 
departments or, i n the case of C ol I ege- wi de groups, the Student Servi ces off i ce, for addi ti onal i nf ormati on regardi ng 
these organi zati ons. 

Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty of f i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For information (including details regarding TEACH grants), visit: www.fi nanci al ai d. umd. edu . 

I n addi ti on, contri buti ons from the C ol I ege of E ducati on A I umni and F ri ends have made i t possi bl e to award a number 
of $1,000 schol arshi ps to deservi ng teacher educati on candi dates each academi c year. These awards are based on the 
foil owing criteria: 

• academic performance 

• financial need 

• I eadershi p and contri buti ons to the f i el d of educati on or 
comrri tment to potenti al I eadershi p i n the f i el d of educati on 

• encouragement of a diverse and multicultural community 

Schol arshi p appl i cati ons may be obtai ned i n the Off i ce of Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj ami n) . A ppl i cati ons al so are 
avai lableon-li ne http://www.educati on.umd.edu/studenti nf o/schol arshi ps/i ndex.html . 

F or more i nf ormati on about the Col I ege of Educati on Schol arshi ps, i ncl udi ng deadl i nes and appl i cati on materi al s, 
contact the Off i ce of Student Servi ces ( 1204 B enj ami n) . 

Awards 

M aryland Teachers of Promise Program 

Each year, the College identifies five to seven of its most promising gifted pre-service educators, who are seniors and 
who pi an to teach i n the state of M aryl and. These i ndi vi dual s become part of a sel ect group of outstandi ng pre-servi ce 
and veteran teachers participating in a mentor-prot<^(5program and educati onal Institute As part of the program, each 
teacher candi date i s pai red wi th an award- wi nni ng veteran teacher mentor (Teacher of the Y ear, M i I ken N ati onal 
E ducator, B I ue Ri bbon School M aster Teacher, etc. ) , who provi des gui dance and support duri ng the transi ti on peri od 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 166 



into teaching. For more information about thisprograrn contact Dr. KathyAngeletti, Assistant Dean 
(kangd@umd.edu). 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Student Services Office 

1204 Benj ani n B ui I di ng, 301-405-2344 
www. educati on. umd. edu/studenti nf o 

The Student Servi ces Of f i ce provi des academi c advi si ng for educati on maj ors regardi ng admi ssi on, ori entati on, 
registration, graduation, and certification. Information about the Praxis assessments and theCollegeof Education 
Schol arshi ps al so i s avai I abl e i n Student Servi ces. 

Educational Technology Services 

0234 Benj ani n B ui I di ng, 301-405-3611 

E ducati onal Technol ogy Servi ces hel ps the C ol I ege advance the eff ecti ve use of technol ogy i n support of student 
I earni ng. The Center provi des a range of technol ogy and medi a resources and servi ces to faculty and students. The 
Center also offers professional development courses, technology planning, consulting assistance, and other outreach 
servi ces to educators and pol i cy makers throughout the state and regi on. A number of research, devel opment, and 
demonstrati on acti vi ti es i n educati onal technol ogy al so are conducted through the Center's grants and contracts wi th 
federal, state, and private funding sources. 

Career Center 

3100 Hornbake Library; 301-314-7225 

www. C areerC enter, umd. edu 

The Employment Registration Program (TERP) includes job listings in private and public schools and institutions of 

higher I earning, on-campus interviews with in-state and out-of-state school systems, and resume referral to employers 

i nterested i n hi ri ng educati on maj ors. I nf ormati on and appl i cati ons from school systems throughout the country, j ob 

search publ i cati ons, and vari ous empl oyment di rectori es also are avai I abl e i n the Career Center. 



A.J AMES CLARK SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING (ENGR) 

3110 J eong H . K i m E ngi neeri ng B ui I di ng, 301-405-8335 

www.eng.umd.edu 

Dean: Darryll Pines 

Associate Dean(s): William Foumey, Mark Shayman, Alison Flatau 

The C I ark School , I ocated i n cl ose proxi rri ty to many of the federal agenci es and techcorporati ons that hel p shape the 
f i el d of engi neeri ng, offers students excepti onal opportuni ti es to prepare for and I aunch rewardi ng careers and hel p 
make the world a better place 

We combi ne ri gorous cl assroom I earni ng with initiati ves that I et students appl y concepts through hands-on work, 
i ncl udi ng the autonomous hovercraft proj ect i n freshman year and capstone courses i n j uni or and seni or years; 
numerous national and international engi neeri ngcompeb tons in which the school is consistently successful; and 
extensi ve i nternshi p opportuni ti es. 

We offer students the chance to engage i n cutti ng-edge research, whether i n the many I abs run by prorri nent faculty 
members i n state-of-the-art faci I i ti es, or wi th potenti al empl oyers i n nearby federal research I abs and corporati ons. 
Research enabl es students to di g deeper i nto thei r maj ors or expl ore new areas of possi bl e i rterest. 

E ntrepreneurshi p i s a key characteri sti c of C I ark School students, and the school offers nati onal I y recogni zed 

I i vi ng- 1 earni ng programs to hel p students understand and begi n the process of tech company f ormati on. The school 
mai ntai ns a strong program to I i nk students wi th counterparts i n the Smi th School of B usi ness. 

With one of the nati ones most acti ve chapters of Engi neers Without Borders, Clark School students can apply thei r 
ski 1 1 s and energi es i n the servi ce of I ess fortunate peopl e al I around the worl d. Servi ce opti ons cl oser to home are 
avai I abl e through the many student soci eti es, al ternati ve spri ng breaks and targeted initiatives started by f el I ow 
students. 

I I i s thi s range of opportuni ti es that makes the C I ark School so val uabl e to tal ented, ambi ti ous students who want a 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 167 

deeper uni versi ty experi ence We encourage you to expl ore further by visiting www.ena.umcl.edu . 
Admission Requirements 

Di rect Admissions Requi rements 

1. Admission to the CI ark School of Engineering is limited. Applicants are reviewed and will be admitted directly on a 
competitive basis. Evaluation is based on high school grades, standardized test scores, activities, leadership and 
demonstrati ons of potenti al to succeed. A n appl i cant may appl y to any of the maj ors offered wi thi n the School . A n 
appl i cant al so has the opti on of enteri ng as an U ndeci ded E ngi neeri ng maj or and wi 1 1 typi cal I y choose a degree 
program i n the f i rst year. 

2. National Merit and National Achievement Finalists and Semi finalists, Mary I and Distinguished Scholar Finalists, and 
B anneker/K ey Schol ars are adrni tted di recti y to the School A cademi c B enchmarks 

Four Year Plan 

The C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng has expectarj ons and policies that are desi gned to promote the success of i ts students 
and to ensure ti mel y progress to the degree. A student, i n consul tati on wi th School and departmental advi sors, i s 
requi red to devel op an i ndi vi dual pi an for ti mel y compl eti on of hi s/her degree program The pi an wi 1 1 be revi ewed by 
the student and hi s/her advi sor on a regul ar basi s and revi sed, i f necessary, as i ndi vi dual ci rcumstances change. U nder 
normal ci rcumstances, a student i s expected to compl ete hi s/her degree requi rements i n no more than four years. 

Benchmarks 

Directly admitted freshmen will be subject to an academic review at the end of the semester in which they attain 45 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and credi ts. I n order to successful I y compl ete the revi ew, students must have an overal I G PA of at 
least 2.0 and have completed EN ES 100, Fundamental Studies English, one Distributed Studies Course from the 
Humanities or Social Sciences, and the foil owing sequence of Gateway requirements: MATH 141, PHYS 161, and 
CHEM 113, CHEM 135, or CH EM 271 with a grade of C- or better. 

Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway courses, either at the University of Maryland or at any other 
uni versi ty or col I ege, wi 1 1 be consi dered to meet the revi ew requi rements. A course i n whi ch a grade of W ( wi thdrawn) 
i s earned i s counted as an attempt Students who f ai I to meet these requi rements by the semester i n whi ch they attai n 45 
University of M aryl and credits may be dismissed from the Clark School and may not reapply. Dismissed students may 
appeal in writing directly to the Associate Dean of Retention, Graduation and Career Services in the CI ark School. 

The second benchmark revi ew occurs two semesters after the 45 credit revi ew, and the thi rd benchmark revi ew occurs 
two semesters after the second review. Transfer students admitted to the Clark School will be subject to only the second 
and thi rd benchmark revi ews. 

Each academi c program has specific benchmark requi rements. Refer to 
www.eng. umd.edu/advi si ng/advi si ng_4-year-pl anshtml for program benchmarks. 

Transfer Admission 

Di rect Admissions Requi rements 

I ntemal and external transfer students wi 1 1 be di recti y adrni tted to the C I ark School i f they meet the G ateway 
requirements, MATH141, PHYS 161, CH EM 113 or CHEM 135 with a grade of C- or better, have completed 
F undamental Studi es E ngi i sh, have compl eted at I east one H umani ti es or Soci al Studi es course, and have a mi ni mum 
cumul ati ve G PA of 3. i n al I col I ege- 1 evel coursework, and who have not previ ousl y been adrni tted to the C I ark 
School of Engineering. Only one repeat of a single course to the set of Gateway courses, either at the University of 
M aryl and or at any other uni versi ty or col I ege, wi 1 1 be consi dered to meet the revi ew requi rements. A course i n whi ch a 
grade of W ( wi thdrawn) i s earned i s counted as an attempt. Students shoul d wai t unti I al I gateway requi rements are 
compl ete before appl yi ng for adrni ssi on to the School . 

Appeal Process 

All students denied adrni ssi on to the CI ark School may appeal the decision in writing directly to the Associate Dean of 
Retenti on, G raduarj on and Career Servi ces i n the CI ark School . External transfer students who are deni ed adrni ssi on to 
the U ni versi ty may appeal to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons of the U ni versi ty . 

Special Note 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 168 



Students with a previous B. A. orB.S. degree will be admitted to the CI ark School of Engineering with a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 in all college-level coursework and a completion of MATH 140, MATH141, CHEM113orCHEM135, and 
PHY S 161 with a grade of C- or hi gher i n each. Post-baccal aureate students must meet al I transfer admissi on 
requi rements. 



Engineering Transfer Programs 

M ost of the community col I eges i n M aryl and provi de one- or two-year programs whi ch have been coordi nated to 
prepare students to enter the sophomore or j uni or year i n engi neeri ng at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. These curri cul a are 
i denti f i ed as E ngi neeri ng Transfer Programs i n the catal ogs of the sponsori ng i nsti tuti ons. The vari ous associ ate degree 
programs i n technol ogy do not provi de the preparati on and transf erabi I i ty i nto the degree curri cul a as the desi gnated 
transfer programs. A maximum of one-half of the degree credits (approximately 60 semester hours) may be transferred 
from a two-year community col I ege program 

There may be some courses whi ch are not offered by the school s parti ci pati ng i n the E ngi neeri ng Transfer program 
Students shoul d i nvesti gate the f easi bi I i ty of compl eb ng these courses i n summer school at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and 
before starti ng thei r j uni or course work i n the f al I semester. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/Degree Options 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 169 



Structure of Engi neeri ng Curri cul a: Courses i n the normal curri cul um or program and prescri bed credit hours I eadi ng to 
the degree of B achel or of Sci ence (wi th curri cul um desi gnati on) are out) i ned i n the secti ons descri bi ng each department 
i n the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng. N o student may modi f y the prescri bed number of hours wi thout sped al permi ssi on 
from the Dean of the School . The courses i n each curri cul um may be cl assif i ed i n the f ol I owi ng categori es: 

1. Courses i n the General Educati on Program, 

2. Courses i n the physi cal sci ences, mathemati cs, chemi stry, physi cs. 

3. Rel ated techni cal courses, engi neeri ng sci ences and other courses approved for one curri cul um but offered by 
another department 

4. Courses i n the maj or department. A student shoul d obtai n wri tten approval for any substi tuti on of courses from the 
department chai r and the Dean of the School . The courses i n each engi neeri ng curri cul um, as cl assi f i ed bel ow, form a 
sequenti al and devel opmental pattern i n subj ect matter. Inthis respect, curri cul a i n engi neeri ng may di ff er from 
curri cul a i n other col I eges. Some regul ati ons whi ch are general I y appl i cabl e to al I students may need cl ari f i cati on for 
purposes of orderl y adrri ni strati on among engi neeri ng students (see the A cademi c Regul ati ons i n chapter 4) . M oreover, 
the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng establ i shes pol i ci es whi ch suppl ement uni versi ty regul ati ons. 

School Regulations 

1. The responsi bi I ity for proper regi strati on and for sati sfyi ng stated prerequi sites for any course must rest with the 
student as does the responsi bi I ity for proper achi evement i n courses i n whi ch the student is enrol I ed. Each student 
shoul d be f ami I i ar wi th the provi si ons of thi s catal og, i ncl udi ng the A cademi c Regul ati ons. 

2. Requi red courses i n mathemati cs, physi cs, and chemi stry have hi ghest pri ori ty. 1 1 i s strongl y recommended that 
every engi neeri ng student regi ster for mathemati cs and chemi stry or mathemati cs and physi cs each semester unti I the 
student has f ul I y sati sf i ed requi rements of the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng i n these subj ects. 

3. To be el i gi bl e for a bachel or's degree i n the Cl ark School of Engi neeri ng, a student must have an overal I average of 
at I east a 2.0 and a grade of C- or better i n al I engi neeri ng and CM SC courses used to sati sfy maj or requi rements. 
Responsi bi I ity for knowi ng and meerj ng al I graduati on requi rements i n any curri cul um rests with the student. 

4. I n additi on to the requi rement for a C- or better i n al I engi neeri ng and CM SC courses, al I students who begi n 
college-level work, either at the Uni versity of Maryland or any other institution in the Spring 2005 semester or later, 
must receive a grade of C- orhigherinall technical courses(eg. mathematics, physics, etc) used to sati sfy major 
requi rements. 

5. A course taken at U M i n whi ch a grade has been earned may not be repeated vi a transfer from another institution. 

6. Students i n the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng must have a ni ni mum 2. U ni versi ty of M aryl and G PA to enrol I i n 
courses at another institution. 

7. A 1 1 students are requi red to compl ete a number of general educati on courses and must f ol I ow the uni versi ty's 
requi rements regardi ng compl eti on of the General Educati on Program. Consult the Academi c Regul ati ons secti on of 
this catalog for additional information. Engineering students who began col lege- level work (either atthe University of 
M aryl and or at other i institutions) duri ng the Fall 1989 semester or later are requi red to complete a j uni or- level 
techni cal wri ti ng course regardi ess of the r performance i n freshman E ngi i sh cl asses. Thi s represents a School pol i cy, 
not a U ni versi ty- wi de pol i cy . 

8. A 1 1 degree programs i n the C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng requi re a rri ni mum of 120 credi ts pi us sati sf acti on of al I 
department School , and U ni versi ty general educati on program requi rements. Students shoul d be aware that for al I 
currentl y exi sti ng engi neeri ng programs the total number of credits necessary for the degree exceeds 120 by some 
number that depends on the sped f i c maj or. 

C urri cul a f or the vari ous engi neeri ng departments are gi ven i n thi s catal og to i 1 1 ustrate how the programs can be 
compl eted i n four years. These curri cul a are ri gorous and rel ati vel y di ff i cul t Surveys have shown that onl y about 
one-thi rd to one- half of the students actual I y receive an engi neeri ng degree i n f our years. The maj ority of students 
(whether at M aryl and or at other engi neeri ng school s nati onwi de) compl ete the engi neeri ng program i n four and 
one- half tofi ve years. 1 1 i s qui te f easi bl e for a student to stretch out any curri cul um; thi s may be necessary or desi rabl e 
for a vari ety of reasons. H owever, students shoul d seek competent advi si ng i n order to ensure that courses are taken i n 
the proper sequence 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 170 



A 1 1 students are urged to compl ete a seni or audi t usi ng Degree N avi gator and revi ew wi th the r departmental advi sor at 
least two semesters prior to graduation. The purpose of the seni or audit is to discuss academic progress and confirm 
that graduati on requi rements are bei ng compl eted. 

Depart m e n ts and Deyees 

The C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng consi sts of ei ght academi c departments and offers the degree of B achel or of Sci ence 
in the foil owing fields of study: Aerospace Engineering, Bioengi neeri ng, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, 
Computer E ngi neeri ng, E I ectri cal E ngi neeri ng, F i re Protecti on E ngi neeri ng, M ateri al s Sci ence and E ngi neeri ng, and 
M echani cal E ngi neeri ng. A 1 1 of the above programs are accredi ted by the E ngi neeri ng A ccredi tati on C orrmi ssi on of 
ABET, www.abetora . Ill Marketplace, Suite 1050, Baltimore, M D 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700. 

Freshman-Sophomore Years 

The freshman and sophomore years i n engi neeri ng are desi gned to I ay a strong f oundati on i n mathemati cs, physi cal 
sci ences, and the engi neeri ng sci ences upon whi ch the student wi 1 1 I ater devel op a prof essi onal program duri ng the 
upper di vi si on (j uni or and seni or) years. D uri ng the f i rst two years, students are i ntroduced to the concepts of 
engi neeri ng desi gn and work i n mul ti di sci pi i nary teams. The School course requi rements for the freshman and 
sophomore years are si mi I ar for al I students, regardl ess of the r i ntended academi c program thus aff ordi ng the student 
maxi mum f I exi bi I i ty i n choosi ng a sped f i c engi neeri ng sped al i zati on. 

E ngjneering Sciences 

E ngi neeri ng Sci ence courses represent a common core of basi c materi al offered to students of several di ff erent 
departments. A 1 1 freshman and sophomore students of engi neeri ng are requi red to take E N E S 100. Other E N E S 
courses, 102, 220, and 221, are specified by the different departments or taken by the student as el ectives. The 
responsi bi I i ty for teachi ng the engi neeri ng sci ence courses i s di vi ded among the engi neeri ng departments. I n addi ti on 
to the core courses noted above, several courses of general i nterest to engi neeri ng or non-engi neeri ng students have 
been given ENES designations. Seethe List of Approved Courses in chapter 8 for further descriptions of these courses. 

Freshman Curriculum 

See i ndi vi dual department requi rements i n the Departments and M aj ors seed on of thi s si te E nteri ng freshman math 
pi acement i s deterrri ned sol el y by performance on the U ni versi ty math pi acement exam and not on the M ath SAT 
score PI acement i n M ATH 115 or I ower wi 1 1 del ay by a semester el i gi bi I i ty to take certai n engi neeri ng courses. 

SophomoreYear 

N o I ater than the sophomore year, a student shoul d sel ect an academi c degree program (A erospace, B i oengi neeri ng, 
Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Fire Protecti on, Mechanical, or Materials Sci ence and Engineering) and this 
department assumes the responsi bi I ity for the students academi c gui dance, counsel i ng, and program pi anni ng from that 
poi nt unti I the compl eti on of the degree requi rements of that program as wel I as the School . F or the sped f i c 
requi rements, see the curri cul um I i sti ng i n each engi neeri ng department. 



Advising 

Advi si ng i s mandatory for al I students i n the CI ark School . Advi si ng for freshmen and undeci ded engi neeri ng students 
i s provi ded by the Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dvi si ng and A caderri c Support, I ocated i n Room 1131 G I enn L . M arti n 
H al 1 , 301-405-9973, and i s avai I abl e by appoi ntment M onday through F ri day from 8: 30 a. m. to 4: 30 p. m. Wal k-i n 
advi si ng i s al so avai I abl e at sped f i c ti mes duri ng the week. A ppoi ntments for other hours can be made by sped al 
request. Students wi th a ded ared engi neeri ng maj or shoul d seek advi si ng from thei r academi c department. Refer to the 
individual program for additional information. 

Minors 

Eng neeri ng Leadership Development 16 credits. Preparing engineering students for lifelong leadership roles in 
educati on, i ndustry, and government i s the goal of the mi nor i n engi neeri ng I eadershi p devel opment. The rri nor wi 1 1 
compl ement the techni cal ski 1 1 s and knowl edge students acqui re duri ng thei r academi c careers to better prepare them 
for I eadershi p and col I aborati ve rol es i n thei r prof essi onal futures. Students may earn the rri nor and a notati on on thei r 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 171 



of f i ci al transcri pt by compl eti ng coursework whi ch focuses on communi cati on, gl obal awareness, proj ect management, 
understanding oneself and working effectively with others. Contact the minor advisor, Ramsey I abaj t{iabaji(cDumd,edu) . 
or vi si t the web at www,ursp.umd,edu/l eadershi p/i ndex.html for more i nf ormati on. 

I nter national E ngneering: 15 to 18 credi ts. I n addi ti on to a strong engi neeri ng background, there i s a need for 
engi neers wi th cross-cul tural experi ence and f orei gn I anguage abi I i ti es. Students may earn the mi nor by compl eti ng a 
course i n I nternati onal B usi ness C ul tures f or E ngi neeri ng and Technol ogy, a G I obal Studi es M i nor Program si gnature 
course, and addi ti onal courses i n I anguage, cul ture studi es, or i nternati onal I y rel ated studi es, pi us an engi neeri ng 
experi ence abroad. Contact the mi nor advi sor, Ramsey J abaj i fjabaji (cDumd.edu , or vi si t the web at 
www. ursp. umd. edu/i nternati onal /i ndex. html for more i nf ormati on. Students who f ul f i 1 1 mi nor requi rements wi 1 1 recei ve 
a notati on on the r off i ci al transcri pt 

Nanoscience and Technology: 15 credi ts. Expl osi ve growth i n the f i el d of nanometer seal e sci ence and technol ogy 
( N S&T) has I ed i n the past few years to many technol ogi cal advances i n devi ces and materi al s structured at the 
nanometer seal e. The I nterdi sci pi i nary M i nor Program of Study i n N anosci ence and Technol ogy i s i ntended to prepare 
parti ci pati ng students for a career i n thi s rapi dl y devel opi ng field. This program draws upon the consi derabl e experfj se 
i n nanosci ence at the U ni versi ty of M ary I and, i n departments di stri buted among three school s, E ngi neeri ng, C omputer, 
M athematics and Physical Sciences and Chemistry and Life Sciences. Students take courses in Fabrication/Synthesis 
and C haracteri zati on, whi ch emphasi ze the experi mental si de of N S&T, as wel I as F undamental Sci ence and 
Sped al i zati on E I ecti ves, whi ch teach the underl yi ng pri nci pi es and di recti ons, and i ncl ude underl yi ng theory and the 
moti vati ons f or N S&T . V i si t the web si t e/vww. nanocenter. umd. edu/educati on/nano_mi nor/nano_mi nor, php for more 
information. 

Nuclear Engineering: 15 credits. The need for engi neers with knowledge of nuclear engineering topics will grow 
si gni f i cantl y i n the corn ng years, wi th new nucl ear pi ants bei ng pi anned, exi sti ng pi ants conti nui ng operarj on, and 
i ncreasi ng i ndustri al and medi cal uses of radi ati on sources. The mi nor i n N ucl ear E ngi neeri ng provi des an engi neeri ng 
student wi th an understandi ng of nucl ear engi neeri ng and i ts appl i cati on to many di ff erent f i el ds, such as power 
generati on, reactor operarj on, and i ndustri al uses. Students i n the mi nor wi 1 1 1 earn the fundamental s of nucl ear reactor 
engi neeri ng, radi ati on i nteracrj ons and measurement, power pi ant desi gn concepts, and reactor safety and ri sk 
assessment. The minor is open to any student in the CI ark School of Engineering. Contact Dr. G.A. Pertmer 
( pertmer@umd.edu) for further i nf ormati on. Students who f ul f i 1 1 rri nor requi rements wi 1 1 recei ve a notati on on the r 
official transcript. 

Project Mana g e m e n t: 15 credits. A basi c understandi ng of proj ect management is becomingi ncreasi ngi yimportant 
for engi neers. Such knowl edge enabl es them to contri bute i mmedi atel y to empl oyers, and to advance thei r careers. I n 
addi ti on to a strong engi neeri ng background, there i s si gnif i cant need for engi neers to understand the fundamental s of 
managi ng proj ects i n order to eff ecti vel y parti ci pate as members of proj ect teams. Students who successful I y compl ete 
mi nor requi rements will receive a notati on on their official transcript. ContactDr. QingbinCui, Proj ect Management 
M i nor A dvi sor (cui (cDumd.edu) or vi si t the web si te :http://pm umd. edu/page. php?i d=642 

Technology E ntrepreneurship: 15 credi ts. The goal of the M i nor i n Technol ogy E ntrepreneurshi p i s to i nf use 
technol ogy-creati ng students wi th that knowl edge and i ts accompanyi ng ski 1 1 s. The M i nor i n Technol ogy 
E ntrepreneurship prepares students for launching successful technology ventures and bringing life-changing products 
and servi ces to market The mi nor devel ops the entrepreneur! al rri nd-set and f uncti onal ski 1 1 sets of students to i mprove 
thei r abi I i ty to create, I aunch, and manage technol ogy ventures. Students earn the rri nor by compl eti ng coursework 
whi ch focuses on entrepreneuri al opportuni ty anal ysi s, marked ng hi gh-technol ogy products, strategi es for managi ng 
i nnovati on, and i nternati onal entrepreneurs!! p and i nnovati on. F or detai I s and contact i nf ormati on, vi si t http://www. mtecr 
http://www. rrtech. umd.edu/educate/mi nor/ 

Living-Learning Procyams 

Flexus The Dr. Marilyn Barman Pdlans Women in Engineering Living & Learning Community 

Women i n Engi neeri ng Program 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall 

301-405-3931 

Director: Paige Smith 

The Women in Engi neeri ng Living & Learning Community (WIE LLC) is open to any first-year female engineering 

student wi th an i nterest i n promoti ng gender di versi ty i n the f i el d of engi neeri ng. Students who compl ete the f i rst year 

of the program are i nvited to parti ci pate i n a second year. The program seeks to promote community among f i rst and 

second year engi neeri ng students cornmi tted to gender di versi ty i n the f i el d and to provi de encouragement and support 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 172 



for academic and professional success by: 

1. i ntroduci ng students to women mentors and rol e model s; 

2. offering professional and personal development opportunities; 

3. hel pi ng students make connecti ons with peers i n engi neeri ng and 

4. rei nforci ng i important techni cal ski I Is needed to succeed i n engi neeri ng. 

The components of thi s I i vi ng and I earni ng communi ty i ncl ude a one credi t semi nar course, course cl usteri ng, 

resi denti al housi ng on a common f I oor i n Easton H al I and resources provi ded i n the resi dence hal I . Parti ci pants wi 1 1 

al so have the opportuni ty to work cl osel y wi th V i rtus: a L i vi ng and L earni ng C ommuni ty for Success i n E ngi neeri ng 

Virtus A L iving and Learning Community for Success in E ngi neeri ng 

Successful Engi neeri ng Educati on and Devel opment Support Program 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall 

301-405-3936 

Coordi nator: Tamara Fuller 

V i rtus provi des f i rst-year mal e engi neeri ng students access to an engi neeri ng based I i vi ng and I earni ng envi ronment 

The pri mary goal of V i rtus i s to promote communi ty among f i rst and second year engi neeri ng students and to provi de 

support for acaderri c and prof essi onal success. L i vi ng i n Easton H al I , parti ci pants wi 1 1 be i ntroduced to a di verse range 

of mentors and rol e model s and offered prof essi onal and personal devel opment opportuni ties. In addi ti on to a common 

resi dence f I oor, the components of thi s I i vi ng and I earni ng communi ty i ncl ude a one credi t semi nar, course cl usteri ng, 

and resources provi ded i n the resi dence hal I . Parti ci pants al so have the opportuni ty to make connecti ons wi th peers i n 

engineering and work closely with Flexus: the Dr. Marilyn Berman Pollans' Women in Engineering Living and 

L earni ng C ommuni ty . V i rtus i s funded through the N ati onal Sci ence F oundati on's Sci ence, Technol ogy, E ngi neeri ng, 

and M athematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP, Award#0969232). 

College Park Scholars- Science, Technology, and Society 

1125 Cumberland Hall 

301-405-0527; http://www.sts.umd.edu 

Director: Dr. Betsy Mendelsohn 

Co-sponsored by the Clark School of Engineering, the Science, Technology and Society (STS) program is one of 11 

I i vi ng- 1 earni ng programs offered by the Col I ege Park Schol ars Program. Thi s 2-year program for acaderri cal I y tal ented 

freshmen and sophomores wel comes al I maj ors, who I i ve together i n C hestertown Hall. In smal I courses, students 

exarri ne the ways that soci al processes shape scientific research and technol ogi cal devel opment, and converse! y, the 

ways that sci ence and technol ogy shape soci ety . Students I earn and practi ce ski 1 1 s of group work, peer revi ew, publ i c 

speaki ng, and acaderri c writi ng, whi ch serve them wel I i n maj or-rel ated courses. Outsi de the cl assroom students 

vol unteer as sci ence demonstrators, tour nearby research I aboratori es, and mentor chi I dren i n STE M . Students are abl e 

to earn credi t for compl eti ng i ntemshi ps, vol unteeri ng wi th after school roboti cs cl ubs, or becorri ng teachi ng assi stants. 

STS program activities build communi ty , cul ti vate I eadershi p, connect coursework wi th real worl d needs, prepare 

students to seek i ntemshi ps, and hel p students to thri ve i n col I ege. 

College Honors Program 

Students in the A. J ames Clark School of Engineering may participate in the University's Honors College, College Park 
Scholars, Gemstone, the Clark School Honors Program, and/or departmental honors programs (see the individual 
department secti on for detai I s) . 

Clark School Engineering Honors Program 

The C I ark School offers an E ngi neeri ng H onors Program that provi des el i gi bl e students the opportuni ty to pursue an 
enri ched program of studi es that wi 1 1 broaden thei r perspecti ves and i ncrease the depth of thei r knowl edge E ngi neeri ng 
students meed ng al I of the foil owing criteria are eligible to apply: 

1. Upper fourth of engineering juniors and seniors; 

2. J uni or standi ng or 60 appl i cabl e credi ts; 

3. Compl eti on of at I east one semester at UMCP. 

The requi rements for compl eti ng the program are as f ol I ows: 

1. A n H onors Research Proj ect whi ch often can be used as a techni cal el ecti ve, a wri tten report, and an oral 
presentation to afaculty panel of the EHP; 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 173 



2. Successful completion of both Engineering Honors Seminars (ENES 480 and ENES 481, one credit hour each); 

3. M ai ntenance of a G PA to remai n i n the upper thi rd of the cl ass. 

F or more i nf ormati on see http://www, enq, umd, edu/current/honors- program 

Approved Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Professional Societies 

Each of the engi neeri ng departments sponsors student chapters or student secti ons of a nati onal engi neeri ng soci ety. 
The student chapters sponsor a vari ety of acti vi ti es i ncl udi ng techni cal meeti ngs, soci al gatheri ngs, and School or 
U ni versi ty servi ce proj ects. A 1 1 students are strongl y encouraged to j oi n one or more of these chapters. 

These organizations are: American Helicopter Soci ety- Intl.: American I nstitute of Aeronautics and Astronautics: 
American Ceramic Society; American I nstitute of Chemical Engineers; American Nuclear Soci ety; American Society 
of C i vi I E ngi neers; A men can Soci ety of H eati ng, Ref ri gerati on, and A i r Condi ti oni ng E ngi neeri ng; A meri can Soci ety 
of Mechanical Engineers; ASM International; Black Engi neers Soci ety; I nstitute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers; Materials Engineering Soci ety; Materials Research Society; Minerals, Metal sand Materials Soci ety; 
Society of A si an Engineers; Society of Automotive Engineers; Society of Fire Protection Engineers; Society of 
Hispanic Engineers; Society of Manufacturing Engineers; and Society of Women Engineers. 

Honor Societies 

The C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng and each of the engi neeri ng departments sponsor honors soci eti es. N oni nati ons or 
i nvi tati ons for membershi p are usual I y extended to j uni or and seni or students based on schol arshi p, servi ce, and/or 
other sel ecti ve cri teri a. Some of the honors organi zati ons are branches of nati onal soci eti es; others are I ocal groups: 
TauBetaPi (Col lege Honorary); A I pha N u Si gma (N ucl ear E ngi neeri ng); Alpha Sigma Mu (Materials Science 
Engineering); Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering); Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical and Computer Engineering); Omega Chi 
Epsi I on (Chemical Engineering); Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering); Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering); 
and Sigma Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering). 

Financial Assistance 

The CI ark School offers schol arshi ps to tal ented undergraduate engi neeri ng students. Thi s i s a competi ti ve schol arshi p 
program wi th schol arshi ps awarded for meri t F i nanci al need and a vari ety of other factors may al so be consi dered. 
N ew freshmen are automati cal I y consi dered for most C I ark School schol arshi ps. C urrent and new transfer students 
must compl ete the oni i ne schol arshi p appl i cati on by M ay 31st for best consi derati on. V i si t the websi tewww. ursp. umd. edi 
www. ursp. umd. edu/schol arshi ps/i ndex, htni f or more i nformati on. 

The Benjamin T. Rome Scholarship is a ful I -ride scholarship awarded to a new freshman student each year. The 
Rome Schol arshi p covers al I expenses (tui ti on and fees, room and board) pi us a book al I owance and a sti pend. The 
award i s renewabl e for up to three addi ti onal years provi ded the red pi ent mai ntai ns good acaderri c standi ng and 
makes progress toward an engi neeri ng degree 

The Herbert Rabin Scholarship is awarded to one or two enteri ng freshman students each year based on merit. The 
Rabin Scholarship, in conjunction with other university scholarships, covers tuition and fees, and room and board. The 
award i s renewabl e for three addi ti onal years provi ded the red pi ent is an undergraduate engi neeri ng student, 
mai ntai ns good acaderri c standi ng and makes progress toward an engi neeri ng degree. 

The Off i ce of Student F i nanci al A i d (OF SA ) admi ni sters al I types of federal , state, and i nsti tuti onal f i nanci al assi stance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other U ni versi ty of f i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For more information, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu . 

Research Units 

Undergraduate Research Programs 

U ndergraduate research programs al I ow qual i f i ed undergraduate students to work wi th research I aboratory di rectors i n 
departments, thus gi vi ng students a chance for a uni que experi ence i n research and engi neeri ng desi gn. Proj ects i n 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 174 



engi neeri ng al I ow undergraduate students to do i ndependent study under the gui dance of f acul ty members i n an area of 
mutual i nterest. For more i nf ormati on, contact the department 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Office of Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-9973 
Di rector: J enna Dol an 
www.eng.umd.edu/advising 

The Off i ce of U ndergraduate A dvi si ng and A cademi c Support Off i ce provi des a broad vari ety of servi ces to assi st 
students duri ng the r col I egi ate careers. I ndi vi dual advi si ng may focus on a number of student rel ated i ssues i ncl udi ng: 
schedule planning, course selection, university policy interpretations, career choices, social and personal adjustments, 
as wel I as i denti f i cati on and support for students wi th sped f i c academi c concerns. The off i ce al so provi des ori entati on 
to new students, cl ears students for graduati on, and i s i instrumental i n hel pi ng students process admi ni strati ve forms. 
The staff works cl osely with other campus off i ces to i denti fy resources that address the various needs of our students. 

Engineering Co-op and Career Services 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3863 
Director: Heidi Sauber 
CareerEngrCcDumd.edu . www.coop.eng.umd.edu 

W hether i ts to wi re robots i n a car pi ant, moni tor a waste water management proj ect, or ref ormul ate cough syrup for a 
pharmaceuti cal company, the Engi neeri ng Co-op and Career Servi ces Off i ce assi sts students i n f i ndi ng cooperati ve 
educati on (co- op) and i nternshi p posi ti ons i n pri vate i ndustry and the government Students may work f ul I -ti me or 
part-time during the fall, spri ng and/or summer semesters. Co-op and internship positions complement classroom 
I eami ng and provi de students the opportuni ty to gai n prof essi onal I evel experi ence, bui I d mentori ng rel ati onshi ps, 
i ntegrate theory and practi ce, corf i rm career choi ces, and hel p f i nance thei r educati on. 

The f i rst step i n the appl i cati on process i s to attend an ori entati on sessi on that focuses on i nternshi p/co-op search 
strategi es. After writi ng a resume and havi ng it critiqued by our off i ce, students are given permission to upload their 
resume i nto our database of engi neeri ng j obs and on-campus i ntervi ews. To assi st students i n thei r search we offer a 
wi de vari ety of workshops on topi cs such as eff ecrj ve resumes, i ntervi ew strategi es, prof essi onal i sm, career fai r 
preparati on, sal ary negoti ati on, and advanced j ob search techni ques. Our website I i sts the current schedul e of 
workshops. I n addi ti on, students have the opportuni ty to meet empl oyers by parti ci pati ng i n our career fai rs, empl oyer 
i nf ormati on sessi ons, and sped al j ob search presentati ons conducted by engi neeri ng recrui ters. V i si t our websi te for 
more i nf ormati o nwww.coop.ena.umd.edu . 

Office of I nternational and Leadership Programs 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3857 
Di rector: J ane F . Fi nes 
www.ursp.umd.edu 

The Off i ce of I nternati onal and L eadershi p Programs i s responsi bl e for devel opi ng i nternafj onal and I eadershi p 
opportuni ti es for engi neeri ng students. Servi ces i ncl ude advi si ng students studyi ng abroad, advi si ng students 
compl eti ng the mi nors i n I nternati onal Engi neeri ng and Engi neeri ng Leadershi p Devel opment devel opi ng faculty-l ed 
programs abroad, advi sing the Breakaway Program (alternative spring break service program), and leadership 
devel opment programs for engi neeri ng students. 

Undergraduate Recruitment 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-0287 
Coordinator: Mr. Bruk Berhane 
www, ursp. umd. edu 

The Off i ce of U ndergraduate Recrui tment i s responsi bl e for outreach and new student recrui tment acti vi ti es i n the A . 
J ames C I ark School of E ngi neeri ng. Servi ces i ncl ude undergraduate recrui tment, meeti ng wi th prospecrj ve students, 
provi di ng K - 12 outreach acti vi ti es, and admi ni steri ng the C I ark School 's schol arshi p program for new students. . 

TheCenter for Minorities in Science and Engineering 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3878 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 175 



Director: Rosemary L. Parker 

The Center is dedicated to increasing the enrollment and graduation rates of African American, Hispanic, and Native 
American students majori ng i n engi neeri ng. The Center provides a complete package of services designed to assist 
students from pre-col I ege through compl eb on of the undergraduate degree. Servi ces i ncl ude academi c advi si ng, tutori al 
assi stance, schol arshi p i nf ormati on, the B Rl DG E Program outreach programs, j ob i nf ormati on and support of student 
organizations. 

Women in Engineering Program 

1131 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-3931 

www.wieumd.edu 

Director: Paige E.Smith 

The Women i n E ngi neeri ng Program ( Wl E Program) i s dedi cated to i ncreasi ng the enrol I ment retenti on, and 
graduati on rates of f emal es i n the School , as we! I as i denti f yi ng and addressi ng thi s group's uni que needs. The 
Program provi des a comprehensi ve set of i ni ti ati ves desi gned to encourage and assi st women students to become 
successful professional engineers. 

Servi ces offered i ncl ude research f el I owshi ps, prof essi onal mentori ng program i nf ormati on I i stserv, websi te, I i vi ng 
and I earni ng community, f i rst year peer mentori ng program workshops on careers, outreach programs, speakers, 
student advi sory board, and support of women engi neeri ng organi zati ons. 

Engineering Information Technologies (E IT) 

2125L J .M . Patterson Building, 301-405-0236 
Executive Director: J ames F. Zahniser, 301-405-3885 
www.eit.umd.edu 

K eepi ng pace wi tin tine I atest devel opments i n the area of i nf ormati on technol ogi es worl dwi de, tine C I ark 
School of E ngi neeri ng provi des a state of-the-art computi ng envi ronment that wi 1 1 be tine standard for 
engi neers i n tine years ahead. Faculty and students have access to computer workstati ons with a wide range of 
engi neeri ng software and technol ogy enabl ed cl assrooms wi tin tine I atest presentati on capabi I i ti es. I n addi ti on, 
E I T provi des access and support on tine I atest tool s and servi ces for onl i ne col I aborati on, presentati on 
technol ogi es, and i nf rastructure servi ces. 

Distance Education Technology and Services 

2104 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-4910; Fax: 301-314-9639 

Assistant Di rector: M arty Ronni ng, 301-405-4899 

www.eitumd.edu 

Distance Education Technology and Services, DETS, provides distance education technology and support 
service to tine A. J ames Clark School of Engineering and thellMCP campus. We serve over 1000 students 
per year by provi di ng graduate and undergraduate courses i n engi neeri ng and other rel ated f i d ds. I n addi ti on, 
we al so provi de techni cal , servi ces to tine campus such as vi deo corf erenci ng, vi deo capturi ng, satd I i te 
servi ces and more 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (SPHL) 

2242 SPH Building, 301-405-2438 

www.sph.umd.edu 

Dean: Roberts. Gold 

Associate Dean(s): DushankaKleinman, Sandra C rouse Qui nn 

Assistant Dean(s): CokeFarmer, Mary Kivlighan 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 176 



The School of Publ i c H eal th provi des prepared on I eadi ng to the B achel or of Sci ence degree i n the f ol I owi ng 

prof essi onal areas: K i nesi ol ogy, Communi ty H eal th and F ami I y Sci ence. I n addi ti on, each department offers a wi de 

vari ety of courses for al I university students. These courses may be used to f ulf i 1 1 the general educati on requi rements 

andaselectives. 

Programs combi ni ng servi ce and i nstructi on are provi ded by the Chi I dren's H ealth and Devel opmental CI i ni c (see 

KNES 389E) and the Adult Health and Developmental Program (see HLSA 287). 

The Public Health Science Program is a third and forth year program at the Universities of Shady Grove. 
Special Advantages and Facilities 

The Friedgen Family Student Lounge, located in the SPH Buildingisavailableforusebyall students in the col lege 
between 7 am and 10 p. m Access is through the student ID card. See the Director of Facilities in 3310 SPH Bldgif 
you do not have access. The Student Servi ce Center, 2242C SPH , has study areas and computers avai I abl e to SPH 
students from 8: 00 am - 4: 30 pm dai I y. Occasi onal I y, avai I abi I i ty and access are I i mi ted due to cl asses and student 
programs. 

Undergraduate Degree Requi rerrients/Degree Options 

The School of Publ i c H eal th offers the baccal aureate i n the f ol I owi ng f i el ds of study: Physi cal Educati on, K i nesi ol ogy, 
Community Health and Family Science. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students who have met 
the condi ti ons of the r curri cul a as herei n prescri bed by the School of Publ i c H eal th. 

TheSchool of Public Health also offers a baccalaureate degree in Public Health Science Thisisa science-based 
program for 3rd and 4th year students. The program is offered excl usi vely at the Shady Grove campus. For more 
i nformati on pi ease refer to www.sph.umd.edu/phs/. 

E ach candi date for a degree must f i I e a formal appl i cati on wi th the Records Of f i ce accordi ng to the schedul ed 
deadl i nes for the anti ci pated semester of graduati on. 

Advising 

At the time of matriculation and first registration, each student wi 1 1 meet with the departmental Undergraduate Director 
who wi 1 1 act as the student's advi sor. Additionally, athl etes and al I students on probati on or di smi ssal have mandatory 
advisi ng and are seen by advisors i n the Student Service Center. 301- 405-2357. 

Departments and Centers 

The School i s composed of several departments and an i nsti tute The f ol I owi ng departments offer maj or programs that 
I ead to a B achel or of Sci ence degree: 
Department of Behavioral and Community Health 
Department of Farri I y Sci ence 
Department of K i nesi ol ogy 

Living-Learning Programs 

Global Public Health Scholars Living and Learning Community 

TheSchool of Public Health offers a Global Public Health Scholars program within the Col lege Park Scholars Living 
and Learning Communities; For more information please refer to www.scholars.umd.edu. 

College Honors Program 

Phi Alpha Epalon. Honorary Society of the School of Public Health. The purpose of this organization isto recognize 
academi c achi evement and to promote prof essi onal growth by sponsori ng acti viti es i n the f i el ds of physi cal educati on, 
kinesiology, family sciences, community health, and related areas. 

Students qual if y for membershi p when they attai n j uni or standi ng i n ki nesi ol ogy, farri I y sci ences, or community 
health, and have a minimum overall average of 3.5 and a minimum of 24 credits at the University of Maryland, College 
Park. For additional information, pi ease contact the Student Service Center, 301-405-2357. 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 177 



Awards 

Awards within the School of Public Health include the Jerry P. Wrenn Scholarships, the Noel Myricks Endowed 
Schol arshi p, the N ed G ayl i n E ndowed Schol arshi p, the J eanette Spi er B eavers M emori al Schol arshi p the A ndrew 
B i 1 1 i ngsl ey E ndowed Schol arshi p, the Davi d H yde Schol arshi p, the Dori s Sands Schol arshi p, the Qui nn Schol arshi p, the 
Alice Morgan Love Scholarships, NASPE Major of the Year A ward, EDA/AAPHERD Outstanding Future 
Professi onals A wards, the Dean's Seni or Schol ars Awards and the Fral ey Award. 

Research Units 

Center on Aging 

Chair and Professor: Dr. Laura B. Wilson 
www.sph. umd. edu/hl sa/A G I N G/ 

The Center on Agi ng, as part of the Department of H ealth Servi ces Adrri ni strati on (a graduate program), sfj mul ates 
and supports agi ng- rel ated acti vi ti es wi thi n exi sti ng departments, col I eges, and school s throughout al I of the vari ous 
i institutions of the U ni versity System of M aryl and. The Center coordi nates the Graduate Gerontol ogy Certifi cate 
(master's and doctoral levels), the university's first approved graduate certifi cate program The Center assists 
undergraduate and graduate students i nterested i n the f i el d of gerontol ogy and hel ps them to devi se educafj onal 
programs to meet thei r goal s. 1 1 i s a research center worki ng i n heal th and agi ng pol i cy, I i f el ong I earni ng and ci vi c 
engagement, di sabi I i ty and agi ng, behavi oral and soci al aspects of agi ng, and heal th servi ce del i very systems. 1 1 al so 
conducts community education programs, assists faculty in pursuing research activities in the field of aging, conducts 
conferences on adulthood and agi ng-rel ated topi cs, provi des on- and off-campus techni cal assistance to practiti oners 
who serve ol der adul ts and sponsors the U ni versi ty of M aryl and Osher L i f el ong L earni ng I nsti tute, L egacy L eadershi p 
Institutes, the University of Maryland Retirees Association, and Retired and Seni or Volunteer Programs International 
(RSVPI). 

Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health L iteracy 

The Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy has been establ ished to address the major publ ic health problem 
of poor health I iteracy and its effect on health outcomes. This is the nation's fi rst academic based health I iteracy center 
and is devoted to improving health through the lifespan with emphasis on closing the health disparities gap. Research 
i s needed to establ i sh the nature of the casual rel ati onshi ps between and among the vari ous factors i ncl udi ng cul ture and 
soci ety , educati on systems, heal th systems and heal th outcomes and costs to devel op eff ecti ve i nterventi ons and heal th 
policy. The Center was establ ished with a generous gift from Alice Horowitz and her family. 

Maryland Center for Health Equity 

The M aryl and Center for Health Equity is designed to address issues connected with health disparities. The emphasis is 
on creati ng eff ecti ve change from the I eve! of the i ndi vi dual to i ssues at the macro pol i cy I evel . 

Student Engagement and Service Units 

Student Service C enter 

1304 School of Public Health Building, 301-405-2753 

www.sph.umd.edu/studentservi ces 

The Student ServiceCenter provi des advising on admissions, orientation, academic policy, 4- year planning, career 

i nf ormati on, and requi red advi si ng for students on academi c probati on or di smi ssal and al I col I ege athl etes. The 

Center collaborates with the departments in recruitment, retention and graduation initiatives. The Center is open from 

8: 00 am - 4: 30 pm week days for use by students for studyi ng and group meed ngs. There are twel ve computers 

avai I abl e for student use 

G ymkana T roupe 

1120 SPH Building, 301-405-2566 

www. gymkana umd. edu 

Director: Scott Welsh 

F or over 60 years, the U ni versi ty of M aryl and Gymkana Troupe has been i nf I uenci ng young peopl e to I i ve heal thy 

I ifestyl es. Founded at the U ni versity of M aryl and Col I ege Park campus i n 1946, the troupe has travel ed throughout 

M aryl and and nei ghbori ng states promoti ng drug-free I i vi ng. E ach of i ts 60+ members pi edges themsel ves to be 

drug-free Through the; r rol e-model i ng and uni que gymnasti c performances, they have i nf I uenced hundreds of 

thousands of peopl e to j oi n them i n I i vi ng a drug-free I i f e. The troupe, whi ch i s open to al I U ni versi ty of M aryl and 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 178 



students of al I abilities, is considered a one-of-a-kind organization and is believed to be the only collegiateexhibitional 
gymnasti c troupe acti vel y touri ng the U ni ted States. A s an outreach program of the School of Publ i c H eal th, the 
Gymkana Troupe uses peer rol e model s who share thei r experi ences and the r message of heal thy I i vi ng wi th others. 
Students i nf I uenci ng students to avoi d drugs i s the heart of Gymkana's program 



THE PHILIP MERRILL COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM (JOUR) 

1100 KnightHall, 301-405-2399 
www. merri 1 1 . umd. edu 
Dean: Kevin Klose 
Associate Dean(s): Olive Reid 
Assistant Dean(s): Emily Hartz, Anne Martens 

Professors: M . Feldstein (Richard Eaton Chair), H.J ohnson (Knight Chair), K. Klose (Dean and Prof), S. Moeller (Prof 
andDir. International Center forMediaand the Public Agenda), C. Rogers (Prof Of Practice), G. Solomon (Prof Of 
Practice and Dir. Povich Centerfor Sports J ournalism), L. Steiner, C. Stepp 
Associate Professors: I. Chinoy, C. Hanson, J . Newhagen, E. Zanot 

Assistant Professors: K. Chadha(Asst Prof andDir. Media, Self & Society, CP Scholars), R. Yaros 
Lecturers: C. Clayton, A. Flynn (Lecturer and Dir. CNS Washington Bureau), P. Fuchs (Lecturer and Dir. Assessment), 
C. Harvey (Lecturer and Dir. I ntemshi ps and Career Development), D. Huffman (Baltimore Sun Distinguished 
Lecturer), S. Katcef, R. Lorente (Lecturer and Dir. CNS Annapolis Bureau), S. Mussenden (Lecturer and Dir. CNS 
College Park Bureau)), D. Nelson (Senior Lecturur and Dir. Carnegie Seminar) 

Professors Emeriti: M. BeasleyJ . BlumlerJ . Franklin, P. Geraci (Assoc Prof Emeritus), D. Gomery, R. Hiebert, L. 
Martin, E. Roberts 
Visiting Faculty: S. Banisky (Visiting Prof), K. B I acki stone (Povich Professor), L. Walker (Visiting Prof) 

The Major 

The Philip M errill Coll ege of J oumal i sm prepares students for careers i n newspapers, magazi nes, TV news, newsl etters 
and onl i ne j ournal i sm ourJ ets. The undergraduate j ournal i sm program cul mi nates i n a B . A . degree i n j ournal i sm. 

The col lege is fully accredited by the Accrediting Council on Educati on inj oumal ism and Mass Communications. 

Students I earn i n col I ege programs such as C api tal N ews Servi ce, a dai I y wi re servi ce i n Washi ngton and A nnapol i s, 
U M TV , a cabl e stati on operated by the col I ege, and the A meri can J ournal i sm Revi ew, the nati on's I eadi ng medi a 
magazi ne. 

Students maj ori ng i n j ournal i sm take approxi matel y one-thi rd (42 credi ts) of thei r total coursework i n the Phi I i p M erri 1 1 
Col I ege of J ournal i sm. J ournal i sm courses are desi gned to provi de students with a worki ng knowl edge of the tool s and 
concepts they wi 1 1 need to perform as top-f I i ght prof essi onal communi cators. 

The remai ni ng two-thi rds (80 credits) of undergraduate coursework consi sts of a vari ety of other subj ects such as 
history, economics, government sociology and psychology. This exposure acquaints students with fundamental 
probl ems and i ssues they wi 1 1 encounter i n thei r careers. Withi n these credits, j ournal ism students must choose a 
"Concentration" (a core of advanced work in a substantive field) to establish competency in a specialized area of 
knowl edge they wi 1 1 be abl e to use as prof essi onal s. 

Program Objectives 

About theCdlege 

The Philip Merrill College of J oumal ism is widely considered one of the best journal ism programs in the nati on, 
bl endi ng a mi x of pri ze- wi nni ng j oumal i sts, communi cati on schol ars and nati onal I y recogni zed prof essi onal programs. 
The school 's mi ssi on i s si mpl e: to produce the best possi bl e j oumal i sts for I eadi ng newspapers, magazi nes, TV , radi o 
and onl i ne news outl ets. Recent graduates are edi tors, reporters and producers at The N ew Y ork Ti mes, Washi ngton 
Post CBS, Los Angeles Times, CNN, America Online and many of the nati on's other top news organizations. 

L ocated I ess than 10 mi I es from the news capi tal of Washi ngton, students parti ci pate i n i ntemshi ps duri ng the acaderri c 
year at The Washi ngton Post, The (Baltimore) Sun, CNN, and a wide array of Washi ngton news bureaus. Inthe 
summer, students intern at top news organizations around the country. Broadcast news students produce and anchor a 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 179 



30- mi nuts ni ghtl y news show that reaches more than 400,000 househol ds i n suburban Washi ngton on the 
College-operated U MTV station, and multi- platform students work on Maryland Newsline, apolitical and public 
policy Web-based news magazine. Advanced students enroll in Capital News Service, an intensive full -time reporting 
program i n Washi ngton, A nnapol i s and Col I ege Park. Students al so parti ci pate i n some of the school 's many 
prof essi onal programs, i ncl udi ng A meri can J ournal i sm Revi ew, a nati onal magazi ne publ i shed six ti mes a year, and 
thej ournal ism Center on Chi Idren & Fami lies. 

College Mission Statement 

The Col I ege seeks to be the nation's preeminent professional school inits field, amodel for others in its integration of 
schol arl y work and prof essi onal practi ce. A s we enter a new century, i t aspi res to I ead i n the uses and study of new 
technol ogi es to i mprove understandi ng and performance i n our f i el ds. I ts mi ssi on i s to educate uni versi ty students at the 
undergraduate, master's and doctoral I evel within a li beral arts context prepari ng them for careers i n j ournal i sm, and 
schol arl y work and teachi ng i n these f i el ds; to el evate the standards of prof essi onal practi ce and to advance the qual i ty 
of publ i c I if e through knowl edge of publ i c i ssues, i ncl udi ng those rel ated to the rol e i n a democrati c soci ety. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

1. Demonstratethe ability to research, write, report and edit relevant news stories acceptable by a professional news 
outlet. 

2. U nderstand the hi story of j ournal i sm, be f ami I i ar with coverage of di verse groups i n soci ety and I earn the rol e of 
journalists in soci ety. 

3. U nderstand the ethi cal gui del i nes and practi ces that govern the prof essi on and the I egal i mpl i cati ons and 
consi derati ons that i nf orm the prof essi on. 

4. Demonstratethe ability to apply tools, concepts and technology appropriate for the presentation of images and 
i nf ormati on i n the prof essi on. 

5. Conduct research and eval uate i nf ormati on by methods appropri ate to the prof essi on. 

6. Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts. 

Special Advantages and Facilities 

The M erri 1 1 Col I ege i s home to many uni que programs and opportuni ti es avai I abl e to undergraduate students: 

UMTV: B roadcast j ournal ism students study and I earn at U MTV, the college-owned cable TV station that houses 

state-of-the-art equipment including DVC Pro, Avid and ENPS systems used in the field today. Students begin their 

broadcast educati on from thei rfirst semester at the Col I ege, vol unteeri ng as crew members for programs produced 

under the gui dance of renowned broadcast faculty members. 

Capital Newsservice: the college's Capital News Service operates news- editorial and multi -platform bureaus 

in Annapolis, Washington, D.C, Col lege Park, a daily television newscast, and an online news magazine. CNS 

provi des students wi th real - 1 i f e reporti ng experi ences coveri ng a beat, devel opi ng sources, generati ng story i deas and 

writi ng on deadl i ne under the supervisi on of a faculty editor. 

Real-World Experience Students take thei r educati on out of the cl assroom and i nto the real worl d. U si ng 

i ntemshi ps, student medi a and i n-cl ass reporti ng, our students don't j ust I earn why, but how. The col I ege i s I ocated j ust 

outsi deWashi ngton, D . C ., the nati on's capi tal , and the country's ei ghth I argest medi a market 

Top-Noteh Faculty: The M erri 1 1 Col I ege i s home to i nternati onal I y renowned j ournal i sts and medi a schol ars. Courses 
are al so taught by worki ng j ournal i sts who serve as adj unct professors. 

Access to Centers of J ournal ism Study: The Merrill Col lege is home to ni ne centers for journalism study and 
prof essi onal devel opment. U ndergraduates have opportuni ti es to i nteract wi th these programs. I nternshi ps are avai I abl e 
for students at two of these centers. Students can wri te and research topi cs i mpacti ng the f i el d at A meri can J ournal i sm 
Review, oneof two national publications that cover the journal ism industry. Students can also intern at theCasey 
J ournal ism Center on Chi I dren& Families. 

Technology for the " Real World" : Students use the same technol ogi es used by prof essi onal j ournal i sts and medi a 
sped al i sts. F rom the I atest i n non- 1 i near edi ti ng systems, to updated technol ogi es f or di gi tal art and pagi nati on, every 
undergraduate wi 1 1 have access to the hardware and software used by prof essi onal s i n tel evi si on and radi o producti on, 
vi sual j ournal i sm onl i ne news and medi a communi cati on. 

Admission Requirements 

J ournal ism is a Limited Enrol I ment Program (LEP). See the Admissions section in chapter If or general LEP admission 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 180 



policies. 

F reshman Admission and the 45-C redit Review 

First-ti me enteri ng freshmen wi 1 1 gai n admission to the Phil i p M erri II Col lege of J oumal ism directly from high school 
on an avai I abl e basi s. E arl y appl i cati on i s encouraged. F reshmen admi tted to the program wi 1 1 have access to the 
necessary advi si ng through the r i ni ti al semesters to hel p them determi ne i f J oumal i sm i s an appropri ate area for the r 
i nterests and abi I i ti es. A cademi c and career advi si ng i s provi ded to j ournal i sm students throughout thei r academi c 
career by qual i f i ed academi c counsel ors and the C ol I ege's f acul ty . 

F reshmen who are adrri tted di recti y to J ournal i sm wi 1 1 be subj ect to a performance revi ew by the ti me they have 
compl eted 45 credi ts. To meet the provi si ons of the revi ew, these students must compl ete ( 1) The two, f i rst-year 
Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and mathematics; (2) at I east nine credits of Distributive Studies coursework, 
(3) J OUR 201 with a grade of C- or higher (J OUR 181, ENGL 101 AND J OUR 200 are prerequisites for J OUR 201); 
and (4) a ni ni mum cumul ati ve G PA of 2. Students must prove grammar ski 1 1 s competency through attai nment of a 
mi ni mum of a C- i n J OU R 181 or an 80 or hi gher on the grammar competency exam offered i n J OU R 181. Students 
who do not meet these requi rements wi 1 1 not be al I owed to conti nue i n the L E P and wi 1 1 be requi red to sel ect another 
maj or. I n additi on freshmen are expected to compl etej OU R 200 by the end of thei rfirst year. 

Transfer Admission 

These requi rements appl y to new transfer students to the U ni versi ty as wel I as on- campus students. 

N ote N o more than 12 transfer credi ts of communi cati ons courses from an accredi ted j oumal i sm program may be 
approved by the Col I ege to be appl i ed toward the degree. Transfer students who wish to receive credit for J OU R 201 
based on work done i n a non- accredi ted j oumal i sm program must pass a prof i ci ency exam. 

I n order to be admi tted to J oumal i sm, transfer students wi 1 1 be requi red to meet the f ol I owi ng set of gateway 
requirements: (1) The two, first-year Fundamental Studies courses: ENGL 101 and mathematics; (2) at least nine 
credits of Distributive Studies coursework, (3) J OUR 201 with a grade of C- or higher (J OUR 181, ENGL 101 and 
J OUR 200 are prerequisites for J OUR 201); and (4) attainment of a2.8GPA for all college-level work attempted. 

Appeals 

Students who are unsuccessful i n gai ni ng admi ssi on to J ournal i sm at the freshman or transfer I evel , and bel i eve they 
have extenuati ng or sped al ci rcumstances that shoul d be consi dered, may appeal i n wri ti ng to the Off i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. The student wi 1 1 be noti f i ed i n wri ti ng of the appeal deci si on. 

Students admitted to J ournal ism as freshmen that do not pass the 45-credit review but bel i eve they have special 
ci rcumstances that shoul d be consi dered, may appeal di recti y to the Col I ege. 

For further i nf ormati on, contact The Col I ege's Student Servi ces off i ce at 301-405-2399. 

Requi rements for the Maj or 

Effective for students matriculating Fall 2012 or later. (Student matriculating before Fall 2012 should contact an 
advisor about requi rements). 

Students are requi red to earn a mi ni mum of 122 credi ts. A ccredi ted j ournal i sm programs requi re maj ors to 
compl ete successful I y approxi matel y two-thi rds of thei r coursework i n areas other than j oumal i sm and communi cati on. 
The Philip Merrill College of J oumal ism at the University of Maryland adheres to this nationwide policy. In practical 
terms, thi s means that of the 122 rri ni mum credi ts requi red for graduati on, a j oumal i sm student must take 42 credi ts i n 
journalism (numbered 100 or above). Of the remaining 80 credits, ami ni mum of 65 must be earned in liberal-arts 
designated courses. 

The Philip Merrill College of J ournal ism stipulates that 56 of the total credits must betaken in upper- 1 evel courses 
(courses numbered 300-499). 

Requi red courses for al I j ournal i sm maj ors regardl ess of whether j ournal i sm i s a student's pri mary or secondary 
major: 

I .Journalism requi rements outside theCdlege 

Students must compl ete the f ol I owi ng I i beral arts coursework compl ementi ng the U ni versi ty's general educati on 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 181 



requirements. Forthe University's general education requirements, consult the General Education program in the 
current U ndergraduate Catal og. 

• A bstract thi nki ng ski 1 1 s requi rement ( ni ne credi ts) 

1. One three-credi t stati sti cs course from the f ol I owi ng list: 

BIOM 301, BMGT 230, CCJ S 200, ECON 321, EDMS 451, GEOG 306, HLTH 300, PSYC 200, SOCY 
201, STAT 400 or a more advanced stati sti cs course. 

2. A mi ni mum of si x credi ts through one or a combi nati on of the f ol I owi ng opti ons. Shoul d a student choose 
to combi ne the opti ons, at I east one I anguage course must be at the i ntermedi ate I evel : 

• L anguage: up to two courses wi th at I east one course at the i ntermedi ate I evel and no more than one 
course at the i ntroductory I evel . ( H i gh school equi val ency does not sati sf y thi s requi rement. ) 

• M ath/Stati sti cs/C omputer Sci ence: up to two courses 

• Any mathematics (MATH) course numbered 111 or higher. 

• Any computer science (CM SC) course. 

• Public Speaking: one course from COM M 100, 107, 200, or 230 

• H i story: one course from H I ST 200 or 201. 

• Behavioral or Social Science one course from A NTH 260; PSYC 100 or 221; SOCY 100 or 105. 

• Economics: one course from ECON 200 or 201. 

• Government and Pol i tics: one course from GVPT 100 or 170 

• Supporti ng A rea: F our upper- 1 evel ( numbered 300 or hi gher) courses f or a rri ni mum of 12 credi ts i n a 
supporti ng f i el d (cannot be i n Communi cati on) . 

I I . J ournalism course requirements 

• JOUR 200: H i story, Rol es and Structures (three credi ts) 

• JOUR 201: N ews Wri ti ng and Reporti ng (three credi ts) 

• JOUR 203: Multimedia Reporting (three credits) 

• J OU R 300: Ethics (three credits) 

• JOUR 352: Online] ournalism (three credits) 

• J OU R 396: Supervised I nternshi p (two credits) 

• J OU R 400: Law of M ass Communi cati on (three credits) 

• J OU R 470-479: M edi a Research (three credits) 

• J oumal i sm C apstone Experi ence (three credi ts) 

• J ournalism Capstone Colloquium Business of J ournalism (one credit) 

SPECIALIZATIONS (15 credits) 

MULTI-PLATFORM: 

J OUR202: News Editing (three credits) 

J OU R320: N ews Wri ti ng and Reporti ng 1 1 (three credi ts) 

J OUR321-389 OneJ oumal ism Ski I Is Electives (three credits) 

E I ecti ves wi thi n J oumal i sm (si x credi ts) 

BROADCAST: 

J OUR262: Broadcast Field and Studio Production (three credits) 

J OU R360: Broadcast News Writi ng and Reporti ng I (three credits) 

JOUR361: Broadcast News Writing and Reporting II (three credits) 

E I ecti ves wi thi n J oumal i sm (si x credi ts) 

III. Specific J ournalism Requirements 

• Completion of J OUR 201: Students must completej OUR 201 with a "C-" or higher. Consult the Undergraduate 
Catal og or onl i ne Schedul e f or a I i st of prerequi si tes and restri cti ons for j oumal i sm courses. 

• "C" Requirement: Students must earn a "C-" or better inj OUR 201 and J OUR 202/262 prior to taking any 
courses for whi ch they serve as a prerequi site. 

Placement in Courses 

E nrol I ment i n J OU R 201 requi res proof of grammar competency through the attai nment of at I east a C- i n J OU R 181 or 
a score of 80 or hi gher on the grammar di agnosti c exam compl eti on of E N G L 101 wi th at I east a C- and successful 
completion of LOUR 200. 



Advising 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 182 



The Office of Student Services, 1100 Knight Hal I, 301-405-2399, provides academic advising to majors on an 
appointment basis. Send e-mail inquiriestojourug@deans.umcl.edu. 

Living-Learning Programs 

College Park Scholars Media, Self & Society 

CPS in Media, Self and Society Director: Dr. Kalyani Chadha 

Co-sponsored by the Philip Merrill Col lege of J ournalism the Media, Self and Society Program is one of the 
I i vi ng/l earni ng programs offered by the Col I ege Park Schol ars Program Thi s two-year program for i ncomi ng freshman 
i s desi gned to gi ve students the opportuni ty to undertake a cri ti cal exami nati on of medi a organi zati ons, i nsti tuti ons and 
practi ces as wel I as gai n practi cal experi ence through i nvol vement i n a medi a- rel ated acti vi ty of the r choi ce F or more 
i nf ormarj on, see the Col I ege Park Schol ars Program secti on i n thi s catal og. 

Honors Prog-am 

A I though no departmental honors program currentl y exi sts wi thi n the Col I ege, acaderri cal I y outstandi ng students are 
recognized through Kappa Tau A I pha, the J oumal ism academic honor society. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The col I ege sponsors student chapters of the Soci ety for Prof essi onal J ournal i sts, the N ati onal Associ ati on of B I ack 
J ournal i sts, and the Radi o and Tel evi si on N ews Di rectors Associ ati on. These organi zati ons provi de students with 
opportuni ti es to practi ce ski 1 1 s, establ i sh soci al rel ati onshi ps wi th other students both on and off campus, and meet and 
work wi th prof essi onal s i n the f i el d. 
F or i nf ormati on on the organi zati ons I i sted, contact the Student Servi ces Off i ce, 1100 K ni ght H al 1 , 301-405-2399. 

Financial Assistance 

The College is committed to enrolling the most qualified students, regardless of ability to pay. Toward that end, the 
Col I ege through donor-sponsored awards gi ves approxi matel y $100,000 annual I y i n schol arshi ps to undergraduates. 
A ddi ti onal I y, the U ni versi ty awards schol arshi ps and f i nanci al ai d i ncl udi ng I ow- i nterest I oans, grants and work- study 
opportunities. 

Sources for Incoming Students 

AIM ncomi ng freshman are automati cal I y consi dered for schol arshi ps granted by the Col I ege. 

Baltimore Sun Diversity in J ournal ism Scholarship- Established by the Times Mirror Foundation, this non- renewable 
award is granted to an i ncomi ng freshman with hi gh academi c achi evement i n hi gh school and wi de-rangi ng cultural 
and economi c background, who resi des i n the Balti more Sun's ci rcul ati on area. 

FrankR. Cormier White House Correspondents' Association Scholarship - Establ i shed i n 1991 by the White House 
C orrespondents' A ssoci ati on, thi s award was renamed i n 1994 to honor the memory of F rank R . C orrri er, who for two 
decades exempl i f i ed the best qual i ti es of Whi te H ouse correspondents wi th a bl end of gentl eness, humor and 
prof essi onal i sm that endeared hi m to the readers of hi s di spatches for The Associ ated Press. Thi s renewabl e 
schol arshi pis awarded to an incoming freshman from Washington, D.C. or Prince George's County, Maryland on the 
basis of financial need. 

William Randolph Hearst Scholarships - Establ i shed i n honor of Wi 1 1 i am Randol ph H earsts 82nd bi rthday, these are 
among the col I ege's f i rst schol arshi ps. A I i mi ted number of non- renewabl e awards are granted to outstandi ng 
M aryl and hi gh school students admitted to the Phi I i p M erri 1 1 Col I ege of J ournal i sm 

Sources for C urrent Students 

Students are sel ected on a basi s of need, meri t, donors' i ntent or a combi nati on of these factors. Belowisaselectionof 
schol arshi ps students may apply for: 

Fred I ., Edna O. and FredJ . Archibald Scholarship 

Paul B erg Diamondback Schol arshi p 

B onni e B ernstei n '92 J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 183 



J ohn Story C I eghorn and N ona Reese C I eghorn Schol arshi ps 

Reese C I eghorn Excel I ence i n J ournal i sm Schol arshi ps 

J . Theodore Crown, Sr. andJosephT. Crown, J r. Scholarship 

Ralph CrosbyJ ournalism Excellence Award 

E ntravi si on C ommuni cati ons B roadcast J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

M arj ori e F erguson- B enj ami n H ol man Schol arshi p 

C arol H omer J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

K. Christopher Houston '85 Scholarship 

J ay J ackson Schol arshi p 

Tom K unkel J ournal i sm Excel I ence Schol arshi p 

Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association Scholarships 

Frank Qui ne and Mary Ellen Doran-QuineJ ournalism Scholarship 

Stanl ey E . Rubenstei n M emori al J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

J oseph R. SI evin Award 

Washington Exanriner J ournal i sm Schol arshi p 

Ri chard W. Worthi ngton J ournal ism Schol arshi p 

Sources for Current StuderrtsTraveling Abroad 

HiebertJ ournal ism International Travel Award 

Gene Roberts Award 

For more i nformati on, and el i gi bi I ity requi rements, vi si t http://www, merri I . umd, edu/underqraduate/schol ashi ps 

Other Sources 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance 
programs and, i n cooperati on wi th other uni versi ty of f i ces, parti ci pates i n the awardi ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng 
students. For information, visit: www.fi nanci al ai d, umd, edu 

The National Scholarships Office is committed to helping students of the University of Maryland identify, apply for, 
and wi n nati onal schol arshi ps and f el I owshi ps i n the r pursui t of hi gher educati on. We al so he! p students f i nd research 
opportuniti es i n thei r f i el ds of study. 

Awards and Recognition 

Maryland-Delaware-District of Columbia Press Association Top News- Editorial Student- Awarded annually to 
an outstandi ng news-edi tori al j ournal i sm student at the M ay commencement. A separate award i s al so gi ven to the top 
broadcast j ournal i sm student and top rail ti medi a j ournal i sm student. 

J ulie Gal van Outstanding Campus Member Award - The Soci ety of Prof essi onal J ournal i sts chapter sel ects one 

graduate i n j ournal i sm who i s outstandi ng i n hi s or her cl ass on the basi s of character, servi ce to the corrmuni ty, 

schol arshi p, prof i ci ency i n practi cal j ournal i sm and si gni f i cant contri buti ons to thei r SPJ chapter. 

Kappa Tau Al pha Top Scholar Award - A warded at each commencement to the j ournal i sm student earni ng the 

hi ghest academi c achi evement for al I undergraduate study. 

Kappa Tau Alpha National Honor Society The top ten percent of the journal ism graduating class is inducted into 

this national organization each commencement. 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 184 



Fieklwork Opportunities 

Internships 

Supervised internships are essential. ChrisHarvey is the Director of the Journal ism Internship Program, 1100A Knight 
Hall, 301-405-2796. 

Professional Expert axe Opportunities 

Capital Newsservice 

Capital NewsServiceisastudent-powerednewsorganizationrunbythePhilipMerrill Col lege of Journalism. Fortwo 
decades, we have provi ded deepl y reported, award- wi nni ng coverage of i ssues of i mport to M aryl anders. 

With bureaus in Col lege Park, A nnapol is and Washington run by professional journalists, we deliver news in multiple 
mul ti medi a formats vi a partner news organi zati ons, a desti nati on Web si te, a ni ghtl y on-ai r tel evi si on newscast and 
affiliated social mediachannels (including Twitter and Facebook). We provide breaking news coverage, in-depth 
i nvesti gati ve and enterpri se j ournal i sm, and serve as a I aboratory for students to test and devel op i nnovati ve new 
methods of reporti ng and tel I i ng stori es. 

UMTV 

F or students i nterested i n broadcast news, opportuni ti es to gai n experi ence wi th cabl e news programs are presented 
wi thi n the curri cul um and by vol unteeri ng at the campus tel evi si on stati on, U M TV . 

Student-Run Campus Media Outlets 

Students can gai n broadcast news and sports reporti ng experi ence through the campus radi o stati on, WM U C . There are 
numerous student-run publ i cati ons on campus. These i ncl ude, The Di amondback, an i ndependent dai I y newspaper that 
appears in pri nt and onl i ne The Diamondback is one of the most-read campus dail ies i n the nation. Among the many 
campus publ i cati ons there are I i terary magazi nes and newspapers of i nterest to sped al popul ati ons. These i ncl ude the 
Eel i pse, B I ack Expl osi on, The Publ i cAsi an, M itzpeh and U nwi nd! magazi ne 



COLLEGE OF INFORMATION STUDIES, Maryland's iSchod (INFO) 

4105 H ornbake B ui I di ng, 301-405-2033 
www. i school . umd. edu 
Dean: J enniferj . Preece 

W hi I e the C ol I ege does not currentl y have an undergraduate maj or, i t offers a I i mi ted number of courses at the 
undergraduate I evel . These courses are suggested for students wi shi ng to devel op ski 1 1 s i n I ocati ng, anal yzi ng, and 
eval uati ng i nf ormati on and those seeki ng to I earn more about career opportuni ti es i n the i nf ormati on f i el d. 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY (PUAF) 

2101 Van Munching Hall, 301-405-6330 

www.puaf.umd.edu 

Dean: Don Kettl 

The School currently offers both courses and co-curri cul ar programs at the undergraduate I evel , as wel I as a M i nor i n 
Sustai nabi I i ty Studi es. Courses may be found under PUAF. These courses are suggested for students wi shi ng to 
devel op knowl edge and experi ence i n publ ic policy and I eadershi p. The School al so offers a 5-year bachel or's/master of 
publ i c pol i cy program for sel ected students. F or addi ti onal i nf ormati on on the wi de range of undergraduate 
opportuni ti es se e www, publ i cpol i cy. umd.edu/current/undergraduate . 



OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 185 



2110 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-9363 
www.ugst.umd.edu 

Associate Provost and Dean: Donna B. Hamilton 

D i rector of A dmini strati on and External Relations: Ashley Self ridge 

Associate Dean for General Education: Douglas Roberts 

Associ ate Dean: Robert Gai nes 

Assistant Deans: Deborah Reid Bryant, Lisa Kiely, Kathryn Robinson, Ann Smith 

Assistants to the Dean: MarkKuhn, Laura Slavin 

Through i ts many programs, the Of f i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es serves al I undergraduate students at the U ni versi ty 
and the f acul ty and staff that support the undergraduate rri ssi on of the campus. The Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es i s 
the pri mary di vi si on at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and responsi bl e for I eadershi p and oversi ght of undergraduate curri cul ar 
and co-curri cul ar education. The responsibilities of Undergraduate Studies include: 

• L i vi ng-l earni ng programs 

• Academic enrichment programs 

• I nterdi sci pi i nary and i ndi vi dual studi es programs 

• Academic advising policy and assessment 

• General Education 

• Acaderri c pi anni ng and pol i cy 

• Enrol I ment management 

• U ni versi ty I earni ng outcomes assessment 

L i sti ngs for programs that report to the Off i ce of U ndergraduate Studi es: 

Academic Achievement Programs 

2204 M ari e M ount Hal 1 , 301-405-4736 

www.aap.umd.edu 

Dr. J erry L. Lewis, Executive Director 

The A cademi c A chi evement Programs (A A P) pri mari I y serves tradi ti onal I y under- represented and I ow- i ncome and 
f i rst-generati on col I ege students. A cademi c support ski 1 1 enhancement, acaderri c advi si ng and counsel i ng, and 
tutori ng are provi ded for these popul ati ons and for students wi th di sabi I i ti es. A cademi c A chi evement Programs 
include the Intensive Educational Development (I ED), Educational Opportunity Center (EOC), the Ronald E. McNair 
Post- Baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair), the Summer Transitional Program, and Student Support Services 
(SSS). EOC, M cNai r, and SSS, are part of the Federal TRI O programs and are funded by the U .S. Department of 
Education to promote access, provide support services, motivate, and prepare students from disadvantaged 
backgrounds for retenti on i n and graduati on from undergraduate programs and to prepare for doctoral programs. 

Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) 

Dr. Marcal Graham Associate Director 
301-429-5933 

EOC is supported by a U.S. Department of Education grant designed to assist persons 19 and older, low-income, and 
f i rst-generati on i n pursui ng post-secondary educati onal opportuni ti es. U M - E OC serves pri mari I y I nner- B el tway 
communiti es i n Pri nee George's County and provi des assistance i n the appl i cati on processes for admi ssi on to and 
f i nanci al ai d for post-secondary educati on. Sped f i c gui dance i s gi ven i n sel ecrj ng col I eges, compl eti ng the F A F SA , and 
promoti ng post-secondary educati on for target popul ati ons. E OC al so works wi th hi gh school seni ors i n some Pri nee 
George's County High Schools. 

Summer Transitional Program (STP) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director, AAP and I ED 
301-405-4739 

The Summer Transi ti onal Program (STP) assi sts students i n both the r acaderri c and personal adj ustment to the 
U ni versi ty . 1 1 i ncl udes very i ntensi ve ski 1 1 s enhancement i n math, E ngl i sh, and col I ege study strategi es, coupl ed wi th 
enrol I ment i n a sel ected three-credi t uni versi ty CORE course with tutori ng to faci I i tate students' acaderri c adj ustment 
I n addi ti on, students enrol Una one- credi t ori entati on course and parti ci pate i n weekl y i ndi vi dual and/or group 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 186 



counsel i ng sessi ons. The si x-week STP i s requi red of al I students adrri tted to the U ni versi ty through SSS/I E D . 

Intensive Educational Development (I ED) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director, AAP and I ED 
301-405-4739 

I E D provi des an array of i ntensi ve acaderri c and tutori al servi ces to f i rst-year and second-year students who parti ci pate 
in the Summer Transitional Program (STP), eligible first- and second-year transfer students, and other eligible students 
who seek academic support. The I ED program begi ns with the STP; prospective students who are admitted to the 
U ni versi ty through the I E D program are requi red to attend thi s si x-week transi ti onal program. Successful compl eti on of 
the STP i s requi red for adrri ssi on to the U ni versi ty . A dmi tted students conti nue to recei ve program servi ces throughout 
the r undergraduate career at the U ni versi ty . 

Student Support Services (SSS) 

Dr. Tilahun Beyene, Associate Director 
301-405-4739 

SSS i s a U .S. Department of Educati on grant supported program geared toward I ow-i ncome and f i rst-generati on 

col I ege students. 1 1 works i n conj uncti on wi th the I E D Program f ocusi ng much of i ts support to f i rst- and second- year 

students. SSS provi des acaderri c and career advi si ng, tutori ng, stress management, and study-ski 1 1 and test-taki ng 

support to el i gi bl e I ow-i ncome and f i rst-generati on undergraduate students throughout the r ti me at the U ni versi ty. 

The SSS program al so provi des f i nanci al ai d workshops and assi stance, i ndi vi dual and group counsel i ng, and 

I eadershi p devel opment workshops. I n I i ni ted cases, SSS provi des suppl emental grant ai d to el i gi bl e parti ci pants i n 

the program. 

Ronald E . McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program 

Dr. Terri D. Wright, Associate Director 
301-405-4749 

The M cN ai r program i s funded and desi gned pri nci pal I y to prepare I ow- i ncome, f i rst- generati on col I ege j uni ors and 
seni ors and/or students from tradi ti onal I y underrepresented groups to attend graduate school , especi al I y, to pursue 
doctoral degrees. The M cN ai r program offers a si x-week summer research experi ence that affords students the 
opportuni ty to work i nti matel y wi th f acul ty mentors on sped f i c research proj ects, ref i ne ski 1 1 s i n wri tten and oral 
communi cati on, computer appl i cati ons, stati sti cs and research methodol ogy. Parti ci pants are requi red to compl ete a 
research abstract/paper for publ i cati on. Seni ors are gi ven the opportuni ty to parti ci pate i n a mock di ssertati on defense, 
they recei ve f i nanci al support toward presenti ng the r research at conferences. The program al so offers assi stance with 
preparati on of a compel I i ng personal statement, adrri ssi on and f i nanci al ai d appl i cati ons, preparati on for graduate 
school adrri ssi ons tests, and successful completion of graduate degrees. 



Asian American Studies Program (AAST) 

1145 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aastumd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

D i rector: J anel I e Wong, Ph.D. 

The Asian American Studies Program (AAST) provides students with the opportunity to study critically the 
experiences of A si an Americans. Through an interdisciplinary approach, students examine the hi stories, communities 
and cul tures of A si an A meri cans as both di sti ncti ve from and connected to the broader themes for di versi ty , ethni ci ty , 
race, gender and mi grati on i n the A meri cas. AAST offers a 15 credit-hour rri nor. For the M i nor, courses may be 
cross- 1 i sted i n other departments and some may sati sf y general educati on requi rements. 

Minor Requirements: 

A. AAST Core Courses (6 credits): 

1. Introduction to Asian American Studies (AAST200/AMST298C) 

2. Asian American History and Society (AAST201/HI ST219M ) 

B. Upper-level Courses (6 credits): In addition to the two requi red foundational courses, students will alsoselectfl/i/o 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 187 



additional upper-level (300/400) courses, one of which would be at the 400 level. The foil owing list of regular and 
special topics courses include: AAST 222, AAST 233, AAST 298, AAST 384, AAST 398, AAST 420, AAST 424, 
AAST498,AAST499 

C. Thefinal requirement for the Mi nor is the successful completion of A A ST378( Experiential Learning- 3 credits), a 
semester- 1 ong i nternshi p at an organi zati on that centers i ts efforts on A si an A meri can i ssues. Such organi zati ons may 
i ncl ude governmental units, non-profit agencies, and on-campus organizations. Alternately, students may opt for 
A A ST388 ( I ndependent Research - 3 credi ts) , a semester- 1 ong research proj ect that al so centers around A si an A meri can 
issues. 

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) Program 

2126 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-314-3242 

www.afrotc.umd.edu 

afrotcdet330@umd.edu 

Director: Colonel J enkins 

The Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) provides students the opportunity to earn a commission as a 
second I i eutenant i n the U ni ted States A i r F orce whi I e compl eti ng the r undergraduate or graduate degree. 1 1 i s hi ghl y 
recommended that students seeki ng a corrmi ssi on contact the A F ROTC department for f ul I program detai I s before 
regi steri ng for cl asses. 

Program requirements 

A F ROTC i s desi gned to be a 4-year experi ence, but the schedul e can be compressed ( ni ni mum of 3 years) for 
qualified candidates. A full four-year program is composed of the two-year General Military Course (GMC) and the 
two-year Professional Officer Course (POC). GMC students receive an introduction to the Air Force and various career 
fields, and may have a chance to compete for schol arshi ps. N on-schol arshi p G M C students i ncur no mi I i tary servi ce 
obi i gati on and may el ect to di sconti nue the program at any ti me. Students wi shi ng to conti nue i n the POC must pass 
al I cadet standards by thei r I ast semester i n the G M C , successful I y compete for acceptance i nto summer f i el d trai ni ng 
course, and compl ete f i el d trai ni ng. POC students concentrate on the devel opment of I eadershi p ski 1 1 s and the study of U 
U ni ted States defense pol i cy . A ddi ti onal I y, al I POC students recei ve a monthl y al I owance of $450- $500. 

Scholarships and I ncenoves 

I f the A i r F orce i s off eri ng schol arshi ps, members of A F ROTC i n al I degree programs are el i gi bl e to compete for 
schol arshi ps based on a competi ti ve sel ecti on process. Schol arshi p red pi ents recei ve money f or tui ti on up to $18, 000 
per year, a book al I owance (current) y $900/year), and a monthl y al I owance from $300 to $500, depend ng on the 
student's A F ROTC year. 



Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 

1150 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-314-9939 

www.armyrotc.umd.edu 

armyrotc@umd. edu 

Director: Lieutenant Colonel Curtis Burrell 

The A rmy Reserve Off i cer Trai ni ng Corps offers students the opportunity to devel op I eadershi p ski 1 1 s pi us earn a 
commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army (Active, Reserve, or National Guard) while completing 
thei r undergraduate degree. 

Four-Year Program 

The four- year program i s composed of the B asi c L eadershi p Course and the A dvance L eadershi p Course. The f i rst two 
years ( B asi c C ourse) consi sts of a general i ntroducti on to ni I i tary customs and courtesy, sol di er ski 1 1 s, communi cati on 
ski 1 1 s, personal devel opment and i ntroductory I eadershi p ski 1 1 s. Students enrol I ed i n the basi c course ncur no 
obligation and may discontinue the program at any time. Inthe final two years (Advanced Course), students 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 188 



concentrate on devel opi ng I eadershi p ski 1 1 s i n organi zati ons. Students must have perm ssi on of the Di rector of A rmy 
ROTC to enrol I i n the advanced course. The Advanced Course requi res five weeks of f i el d trai ni ng at Fort Lewi s, 
Washi ngton the summer after the r j uni or year. 

Two-Year Program 

The two-year program i s avai I abl e to students wi th two years remai ni ng i n thei r uni versi ty studi es. The academi c 
requi rements for thi s program are i denti cal to the A dvanced Course i n the four-year program, and students are el i gi bl e 
to receive the same benefits. Prerequisites for the Advance Course must be f ulf i 1 1 ed pri or to enrol I ment. The fol I owi ng 
opti ons exi st to hel p students f ul f i 1 1 B asi c C ourse requi rements before enrol I i ng i n the A dvance C ourse 

1. Leadershi p Trai ni ng Course (LTC): Students may attend a five week adventure chal I enge course at Fort K nox, 

K entucky . Students shoul d start the appl i cati on process for thi s opti on no I ater than J anuary of thei r sophomore year. 

2. Veterans: Students with pri or military service. 

3. Basic Training: Constructive credit will beawardedforstudentswhohavecompletedBasicTrainingpriorto 
starti ng thei r j uni or year. 

4. ReserveDuty: Students serving in the Reserves or National Guard Training pri or to entering their junior year or 
starti ng a graduate program. 

5. J ROTC : Students who compl eted 3-4 years of J ROTC i n H i gh School . 

6. Servi ce A cademy or Seni or ROTC : Two year attendance at a servi ce academy or successful compl eti on of two 
years in a sister service Senior ROTC training can qualify for constructive credit. 

Scholarships and I ncentives 

Army ROTC Scholarships are avai I able for four, three or two years on a competitive basis. The scholarships are based 
solely on merit notfinancial need. Scholarshipawardees may applybenefits to eitherRoom and Board or Tuition and 
M andatory Fees. Anadditional book allowance ($1,200 a year) and a non-taxable monthly stipend ranging from 
$300- $500 based on academic year is extended to students. 

A rmy ROTC students/cadets may compete for summer trai ni ng opportuni ti es to i ncl ude A i rborne, A i r A ssaul t, Sapper 
School , Combat Di ver Qual i f i cati on, or N orthem Warfare Trai ni ng duri ng the summer and wi nter breaks. 
Additionally, students/cadets may compete for summer abroad opportunities. Previous Army ROTC cadets have 
compl eted summer abroad i n B razi I , G reece, I ndi a, M orocco, Panama, SI ovaki a, and Estoni a (to name a few) . 

Curriculum 

Basic L eadershi p Course 

F reshman Y ear: ARMY 101 (f al I ) A RM Y 102 (Spri ng) 
Sophomore Y ear: ARMY 201 (Fall) ARMY 202 (Spring) 

Advanced L eadershi p Course 

J uni orYear: ARMY301 (Fall) ARMY302 (Spring) 
Seni orYear: ARMY401 (Fall) ARMY402 (Spring) 

The Freshman and Sophomore level classes are open to any student for credit: ARMY 101, 102, 201, 202 (and 
103/104- physical fitness), whether or not he or she is enrol led as a cadet in the A rmy ROTC program. Thejuniorand 
Senior levels are restricted to "Cadet" status only (ARMY 301,302, 401 and 402). Contact Army ROTC for further 
information. 

Beyond the C lassroom 

1104 South Campus Commons, Building 1, 301-314-6621 

www.BeyondTheClassroom.umd.edu 

btcinfo@umd.edu 

Di rector: J ames V . Ri ker 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 189 



B eyond the C I assroom ( BTC ) i s an i nterdi sci pi i nary living-l earni ng program that prepares students to be acti ve and 
responsible citizens and leaders in a complex, multi-cultural, and global society. Students develop the educational and 
prof essi onal I eadershi p ski 1 1 s to understand and to contri bute constructi vel y to ci vi c engagement and soci al change i n a 
global context Students address significant civic and social issues through exciting internship, community service, and 
ci vi c I earni ng experi ences wi th nonprof i t, nongovernmental and ci vi I soci ety organi zati ons i n the greater Washi ngton, 
D.C. metropolitan area. Through its integrated academic, experiential, and service components that offer students 
real - worl d I earni ng opportuni ti es outsi de the cl assroom, BTC enabl es students from al I di sci pi i nes and maj ors to 
develop and to realize their potential for civic I eadershi pat the local, national and global levels. BTC isa 
three-semester program open to al I sophomores, j uni ors, and seni ors. 

Center for Teaching Excellence 

2301 M ari e M ount Hal 1 , 301-405-9356 

www.cteumd.edu 

cte@umd.edu 

Di rector: Spencer Benson 

The Center for Teachi ng Excel I ence supports departmental , i ndi vi dual and campus-wi de efforts to enhance teachi ng 
and I earni ng at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and. The Center offers assi stance to departments, f acul ty, graduate and 
undergraduate teachi ng assistants. The Center provi des workshops, teachi ng assistant devel opment, eval uati on and 
support strategi es for i mprovi ng teachi ng and I earni ng, i ndi vi dual consul tati ons for f acul ty and graduate students, 
research on current teachi ng practi ces, and i mpl ementati on of i nnovati ve teachi ng and I earni ng strategi es. The Center 
for Teachi ng Excel I ence i s a uni t wi thi n the Of f i ce ofj ndergraduate stud es . 



College Park Scholars Program (C PSP) 

1125 Cumberland Hall, 301-314-2777 

www.schol ars. umd. edu 

Executive Director: Dr. Greig Stewart 

Col I ege Park Schol ars i s a nafj onal I y accl ai med I i vi ng and I earni ng program that offers outstandi ng students the best 
elements of a small residential col I ege paired with the exciting opportuni ties avail able at a large public research 
uni versi ty . E ach of i ts 11, two-year programs for freshmen and sophomores provi des a cl ose- kni t communi ty and a 
chal I engi ng academi c experi ence. Students attend weekl y, f acul ty- 1 ed col I oqui a that encourage acti ve di scussi on and 
debate. Other courses i n the curri cul um sati sf y G eneral E ducati on requi rements. I n the second semester of the r 
sophomore year, students choose from i ndependent research, servi ce-l earni ng proj ects, or i ntemshi ps - both on and off 
campus - to sati sf y the r Schol arspracti cum requi rement 

The Programs' focus on community offers many advantages. Program faculty maintain offices in Cambridge 
Community residence halls which facilitates meeting with students. Several program faculty lead study-abroad 
experi ences duri ng the wi nter term or summer semester. L i vi ng together i n the resi dence hal I s he! ps students form 
study groups for common courses. Schol ars al so engage wi th guest speakers and have the opportuni ty to confj nue 
conversati ons outsi de the cl assroom. Program di rectors encourage students to pursue I eadershi p opportuni ti es i n 
co-curri cul ar acti vi ti es, desi gn and i mpl ement communi ty servi ce and soci al events, parti ci pate i n mentori ng programs, 
recrui tment acti vi ti es . or serve on the Student Advisory Board . 

U pon successful compl erj on of the program, students earn an academi c C i tati on (requi rements vary by program) . I n 
the r j uni or year, students are encouraged to bui I d on the r Schol ars experi ences by parti ci pati ng i n departmental honors 
programs and other research and internship opportunities. 

Admission to College Park Scholars is selective and by invitation. Upon invitation to Scholars, students indicate their 
preference from the f ol I owi ng programs: 

Arts 

B usi ness, Soci ety, and the Economy 

Environment, Technology and Economy 

Global Public Health 

I ntemarj onal Studi es 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 190 



Life Sciences 

Media, Self, and Society 

Public Leadership 

Sci ence and G I obal C hange 

Science, Discovery, and the Universe 

Science, Technology, and Society 



Federal Semester Program 

2407 M ari e M ount Hall, 301-314-0261 
www.f ederal semester, umd. edu 
federal semester@umd.edu 
Di rector: Dr. J oan Burton 

The Federal Semester Program i s a hi ghl y sel ecti ve, yearl ong program offered withi n the Off i ce of U ndergraduate 
Studi es, i n conj uncti on wi th other col I eges, programs and campus i ni ti ati ves. The program bri ngs together students 
from al I di sci pi i nes to I earn, di scuss and expl ore i ssues of federal pol i cy, and gal vani zes them toward publ i c servi ce 
careers. Ri si ng sophomores, j uni ors, and seni ors wi th strong academi c backgrounds and an i nterest i n publ i c servi ce are 
encouraged to apply. The Federal Semester Program consists of three primary components: 

1. TheFederal Semester Seni nar: UNIV348 (3 credits, fall semester). A choice of several seminar courses, each 
focused on a sped f i c theme wi thi n federal pol i cy (currentl y, heal th pol i cy, homel and securi ty pol i cy, f orei gn 
pol i cy, or energy and envi ronmental pol i cy). The seni nars benefit from trie di versity of students who parti ci pate 
i n the program. The smal I setti ng al I ows students to bri ng knowl edge from the r di sci pi i nary focus i nto the 

di scussi on. Taught by an i ndustry expert the semi nars exarri ne the pol i cy- maki ng process and di scuss vi tal 
i ssues wi thi n each theme. G uest speakers offer real - worl d perspecti ves on how governments and other actors 
implement pol icy. 

2. The Internship: UNIV349 (3-6 credits, spring semester). The Federal Semester experiential I earning course offers 
credi t f or an i ntemshi p wi th a federal agency or rel ated organi zati on. I n cl ass, students work on prof essi onal 
devel opment and ref I ect on the r i ntemshi p experi ences through j ournal assi gnments ( Wi th perrri ssi on, students 
may compl ete the i ntemshi p under the course number for i ntemshi ps i n the students maj or) . 

3. Support ng course work: Two regul ar U M courses, approved by the program, that compl ement the Federal 
Semester mission (6 credits). With permission, students may apply courses completed prior to the Federal 
Semester year. 

In addition, students participate in Federal Semester Program activities including visits to Capitol Hill and federal 

agenci es, conversati ons with I eaders i n publ i c pol i cy, prof essi onal devel opment workshops and an end-of -the- year 

reception. 

Students i n the program must have compl eted 45 credi ts by the end of the semester i n whi ch they appl y and have a 

grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Fordetailsandapplicationpleaseseewww.fecleralsemester.umd.edu. 

First Year Book Program 

Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies 

2110 Marie Mount Hal I 

www.fi rstyearbook. umd. edu 

Director: LisaKiely 

Each year si nee 1993, the U ni versity has sel ected a book for all first year students. The goal of the F i rst Y ear B ook 

Program(FYB) is to provide a shared intellectual experi ence for all new students along with the opportunity to discuss 

the book from a vari ety of di sci pi i nes. Courses, departmental I ectures, I i vi ng/l earni ng programs and student groups al I 

sponsor events that compl ement a maj or address by the author and/or other i mportant vi si tors to campus. 

General Education 

2110 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-9361 

www. ugst. umd. edu/core 

Laura SI avin: Assistant to the Dean 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 191 



General Education 

To earn a baccal aureate at the U ni versity of M aryl and al I students compl ete both a maj or course of study and a 
campus- wide general education program For more information, seeChapter5, General Education. 

General Education@umd (effective beginning fall 2012) 

2100 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-9363 

Contact: Dougl as Roberts, Associ ate Dean for General Education 

www.qened, umd, edu 

gened@umd.edu 

CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences Program 

2110 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-9361 

www. ugst. umd. edu/core 

Laura SI avin: Assistant to the Dean 

Global Studies Minor Program 

www.alobalstudie5.umd.edu/ 

The G I obal Studi es M i nor Program provi des opportuni ti es for students from any di sci pi i ne or maj or 
to study how evol vi ng gl obal connecti ons affect the wd I - bei ng of peopl e throughout the worl d. 
Students i n thi s i nterdi sci pi i nary program devd op an understandi ng and appreci ati on of how and 
why i nteracti ons across nati onal and ethni c borders are shaped by I anguage, culture, politics, 
economi c devd opment, and corf I i ct 

The program i s compri sed of a number of sped al i zati on tracks whi ch address i ssues from the 
perspective of different disci pi i nes. The tracks are 

• I ntemati onal Devel opment and Corf I i ct M anagement 

• International Engineering 

• Global Poverty 

• Global Terrorism 

A 1 1 students choose one course from a set of "si gnature" courses outsi de of thd r chosen track for 
exposure to maj or gl obal i ssues addressed by the other Gl obal Studi es M i nors. The nri nors provi de 
an opportuni ty for an experi enti al component wi thi n a students d ecti ve courses, i nd udi ng a study 
abroad experience. The Global Studies M i nor Program i nd udes special activi ties that i nvol ve 
students across the mi nors, such as sped al speaker forums, parti ci pati on i n maj or events, and 
experi ences i n Washi ngton, DC . 

Honors College 

Anne Arundel Hall, 301-405-6771 

www.honors.umd.edu 

honors@umd.edu 

Di rector: Professor Wi 1 1 i am Dorl and 

The Honors College i s home to M aryl and's hi ghl y accl ai mad programs and courses for students wi th excepti onal 
academic talents. Honors creates a very special community of faculty and intellectually gifted undergraduates. Small 
cl asses and outstandi ng teachers encourage di scussi on and foster i nnovati ve thi nki ng across academi c di sci pi i nes. 
H onors students have excl usi ve access to H onors I i vi ng- 1 earni ng program courses, H onors semi nars, and H onors 
versions of courses offered by the academic departments on campus. 

Students i n the H onors Col I ege may earn an H onors Col I ege C i tati on on the transcri pt by compl eti ng coursework and 
requi rements i n an Honors Li vino- Learning Program and by maintaining an overall 3.2 GPA. Honors Living- Learning 
Programs i ncl ude Digital Cultures and Creativity . Entrepreneurship and I nnovati on, Gemstone . Honors Humanities . 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 192 



I integrated L if e Sci ences. and University Honors . Acceptance of first- year students into the Honors Col lege is 
competi ti ve and by i nvi tati on based on the standard appl i cati on to the U ni versi ty of M ary I and ( by N ovember 1st for 
best consi derati onforHonorsColl ege and meri t schol arshi ps) . 

I n addition to joining an Honors College Living- Learning Program, Honors students may apply to one of 40 
Departmental Honors Programs offered by the academi c departments and col I eges on campus i n order to take f ul I 
advantage of advanced, di sci pi i ne- based H onors coursework and research opportuni ti es i n the r maj or area of study. 
M ost departmental honors programs begi n i n the sophomore or j uni or year. Students i n a Departmental H onors 
Program may earn departmental honors on the transcri pt and di ploma. 

I ncf vidual Studies Program 

2407 M ari e M ount Hall, 301-314-0023 

www.ivsp.umd.edu 

Di rector: Dr. J oan Burton 

Thelndividual Studies Program (I VSP) is a degree-granting academic program administered through the Office of 
U ndergraduate Studi es. The program enabl es students to desi gn the r own i nterdi sci pi i nary maj ors I eadi ng to the 
B achel or of A its or B achel or of Sci ence degree Students draw pri marl I y from the U ni versi ty of M ary I and's course 
of f eri ngs to form an academi c concentrati on not otherwi se avai I abl e to them at the i nsti tuti on. A wri tten proposal that 
def i nes the student's maj or and outl i nes the curri cul um i s requi red to appl y to the program. I ndi vi dual I y created student 
maj ors have recently included such titles as International Relations and Diplomacy, Peace Bui I ding and Social Change, 
Global Health, 3D Environment Modeling and Design, Environmental Sustainability, Education and Social Change in 
Latin America, Healthcare Management for Diverse Communities, Global Development, Middle Eastern Studies, 
A si an A meri can Pol icy and Advocacy, International Relations and EastAsia, Women's Health and Global 
Communication, Renaissance Studies, and Urban Design and Studies. 

Students must seek the gui dance and approval of a F acul ty M entor pri or to havi ng thei r proposal revi ewed by the 
I ndi vidual Studies Faculty Review Board. If approved, the courses agreed upon by the Faculty Review Board become 
the basi s for the student's maj or requi rements. These I i sted requi rements from numerous academi c departments, al ong 
wi th the CORE general educati on requi rements, are anal ogous i n most ways to the academi c requi rements gi ven to 
students who sel ect from the U ni versi ty's tradi ti onal maj ors. H owever, each student i s requi red to desi gn a uni que 
program of study and defend it i n order to be a part of I VSP. 

I ndi vi dual Studi es students must compl ete a seni or capstone proj ect and are encouraged to engage i n i nternshi ps, 
research proj ects, i ndependent studi es, and study abroad to suppl ement thei r work i n the cl assroom. D rawi ng from 
real -I i f e experi ence as a suppl ement to the academi c curri cul um i s general I y encouraged. These proj ects often serve as 
a way for the students to devel op academi c connecti ons among the mul ti pi e di sci pi i nes i nvol ved i n thei r programs. 
Whi I e I VSP gives students the opportunity to create a uni que academi c program focused on a specif i c area of study, 
usi ng courses from mul ti pi e academi c departments, i t does not substi tute for or repl i cate the educati onal goal s of 
existing University programs, including the Limited Enrollment Programs (LEPs). I VSP programs may not include 
substantial numbers of courses from LEP departments. 

Devel oping a successful IVSP proposal takes time and involves several meetings to review and edit the draft proposal. 
I nterested students shoul d contact the I V SP staff and begi n the appl i cati on process earl y i n thei r academi c career. 
Working closely with the I VSP staff and their prospective Faculty Mentor, students should plan to complete and 
submittheirlVSP proposal, preferably during their sophomore year, or in their junior year, before reaching 90 credits. 

To beactvittBd intothel ndvidual Stucies Program the student trust 

1. H ave a cl earl y def i ned academi c goal that cannot be reasonabl y sati sf i ed i n an exi sti ng curri cul um at the U ni versi ty 
of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

2. Have at least 30 earned college credits with at least 12 credits completed at College Park. 

3. Have a mini mum of a2.5GPA ineachof their previous two semesters of col I ege and at I east a 2.0 G PA overall. 

4. Compl ete at I east 30 additional credits beginning the term foil owing admission to IVSP. 

5. I denti f y an appropri ate f acul ty mentor, pref erabl y tenured or tenure track, wi th si gni f i cant undergraduate educati on 
experi ence rel ated to the f i el d of study. 

6. C ompl ete a detai I ed pi an of study ( proposal ) that i s approved by thei r F acul ty M entor and then approved by the 
I ndi vidual Studies Faculty Review Board. This proposal will include: 

a. A cl ear statement of the central academi c purpose for thei r maj or. 

b. Specif i c course requi rements i ncl udi ng at I east 27 credits of upper- di vi si on maj or coursework (300 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 193 



and 400 level) beyond the IVSP courses (IVSP 317, IVSP 318, and I VSP 420). 

c. The list of courses must include at least one Writing Craft course (in addition to the CORE Fundamental 
Studi es Academi c Writi ng and the Professional Writi ng requi rements) sel ected from an approved I ist that is 
avai I abl e from the I ndi vi dual Studi es staff. 

d. A semester- by-semester pi an for the compl eti on of thei r undergraduate degree withi n a reasonabl e 
period of time 

7. Complete the I VSP Departmental Notifi cation Form in order to notify academic units from which they will take 
three or more 300- to 400-1 evel courses. 

Following admission, students must 

1. Earn a grade of C- or better in all courses requi red i n thei r I VSP program of study, i ncl udi ng I VSP 420 as wel I as a 
sati sf actory grade i n I V SP 317. 

2. Complete mandatory advising sessions with their Faculty M entor and the IVSP staff every semester, including a 
revi ew of thei r semester- by-semester academi c pi an for compl eti on of thei r I V SP program. 

3. I f not al ready compl eted, work towards i mmedi ate compl eti on of the F undamental Studi es requi rements. 
F or detai I s and f urther i nformati on, vi si t the I V SP websi te at www. i vsp umd. edu. 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) 

2417 M ari e M ount H al 1 , 301-405-5428 

www. I gbts umd. edu 

lgbts@umd.edu 

Director: Dr. MarileeLindemann 

The Program in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (LGBT) offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate 
certi f i cate and a mi nor desi gned to exami ne the I i ves, experi ences, i denti ti es and representati ons of L G BT persons, 
those who are today descri bed as havi ng a mi nori ty sexual ori entati on or who are gender transgressi ve Students study 
LGBT families and communities, cultures and subcultures; histories, institutions, languages and literatures; economic 
and political I i ves; and the compl ex rel ati ons of sexual mi nori ti es to the cul ture and experi ence of the gender 
conformant and ( hetero) sexual maj ori ty . L G BT Studi es i s an i nterdi sci pi i nary and mul ti di sci pi i nary f i el d, and 
promotes the application of new theories and methodologies (eg., queer, feminist critical race, and multicultural 
theori es) to establ i shed di sci pi i nes, and i t advances the generati on of new knowl edge wi thi n tradi ti onal f i el ds of 
schol arshi p. Through study of sexual mi noriti es, students gai n an understandi ng of and respect for other differences i n 
human lives such as age, ability, class, ethnicity, gender, race, and religion. With their faculty advisors, certificate 
candi dates desi gn a program that compl ements thei r maj or f i el d of study. 

Certificate Requirements: 

21 credits 15 credits are in required courses, while 6 credits are earned in two elective courses. 
A . Requi red core curri cul um for the Certi f i cate i n LGBT Studi es (15 credits) 

1. L G BT200- 1 ntroducti on to L esbi an, G ay, B i sexual , and Transgender Studi es 

2. One lower- 1 evel course focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT people, either LGBT 265 
(X-listed as ENGL 265) or LGBT 291 (X-listed as CM LT 291); 

3. One of the f ol I owi ng upper-di vi si on courses focused on the personal , soci al, political, and hi stori cal 
aspects of LGBT people LGBT 350, LGBT 407 (X-listed as PHIL 407), or LGBT 494 (X-listed as WM ST 
494); 

4. One of the foil owing upper-di vision courses focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT 
people LGBT 359 (X-listed as ENGL 359), LGBT 459 (X-listed as ENGL 459), LGBT 465 (X-listed as 
ENGL 465); or LGBT 327 

5. One of the foil owing: 

a. LGBT488 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 194 



Seminar in LGBT Studies 

b. LGBT386 

Supervised Internship- LGBT Community Organizations 

B. Elective courses for the Certificate i n LGBT Studies (6 credits) 

Students choose six hours of elective credits in consultation with their advisor in LGBT Studies. At least three hours of 
el ecti ve credi ts must be from upper-di vi si on courses ( i . e , those numbered 300 or above) . Students are encouraged to 
choose el ecti ves to compl ement thei r knowl edge of L G BT peopl e and i ssues by expl ori ng di sci pi i nes that contrast wi th 
the maj or f i el d of study. Students may sel ect el ecti ve courses from the I i st of core courses above or from a I i st of 
approved courses mai ntai ned by the program The I i st i s updated regul arl y and avai lableat 
www. I gbts. umd. edu/rri nor. html . A student may al so peti ti on to have any other course fulfil I this requi rement by 
provi di ng evi dence, usual I y the syl I abus, that a substanti al amount of the course work, usual I y i ncl udi ng a term paper, 
consists of LGBT material. 

• A ppropri ate substi tuti ons for courses I i sted i n categori es 2 through 4 above may be made wi th approval from the 
Director of LGBT Studies. 

• No course earned with a grade below "C-" will count toward the certificate in LGBT Studies. 

• Students may use a maxi mum of ni ne credi ts (or three courses) to sati sf y the requi rements of both thei r maj or and 
the certi f i cate i n L G BT Studi es. 

• No more than ni ne of the requi red credi ts may be taken at an i nsti tuti on other than the U ni versi ty of M ary I and, 
Col lege Park. 

• Students must decl are the certi f i cate i n L G BT Studi es to the D i rector of L G BT Studi es one year pri or to thei r 
i ntended graduati on to assure appropri ate advi si ng and record- keepi ng. 

Minor Requirements 

15 credits 12 credits are in required courses, while 3 credits are earned in one upper-level elective course. 

A . Requi red core curri cul um for the M i nor i n LGBT Studi es (12 credits) 

1. LGBT 200-lntroductionto Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 

2. One lower-level course focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT people, either LGBT 265 
(X-listed as ENGL 265) or LGBT 291 (X-listed as CM LT 291); 

3. One of the f ol I owi ng upper-di vi si on courses focused on the personal , soci ^, political, and hi stori cal 
aspects of LGBT people LGBT 350, LGBT 407 (X-listed as PHIL 407), or LGBT 494 (X-listed as WM ST 
494); 

4 One of the foil owing upper-di vision courses focused on literature, art, or culture by or about LGBT 
people LGBT 359 (X-listed as ENGL 359), LGBT 459 (X-listed as ENGL 459), LGBT 465 (X-listed 
as465);orLGBT327. 

B. Elective course for the Mi nor in LGBT Studies (3 credits) 

An upper-di vision elective will compl ement the required courses. This elective may be a course from categories 3 and 4 
above that has not been used to f ulf i 1 1 requi rements; or it may be one of the capstone courses i n LGBT Studi es (LGBT 
386 or LGBT 488), or a course chosen from the list of approved el ecti ves for the LGBT Studies program. Thelistof 
approved el ecti ves i s avai I abl e at www. I gbts. umd. edu/rri nor. html . A student may al so peti ti on to have any course 
fulfil I this requi rement by provi di ng evi dence, usual I y the syl I abus, that a substanti al amount of the course work, 
usual I y i ncl udi ng a term paper, consi sts of L G BT materi al . 

• A ppropri ate substi tuti ons for courses I i sted i n categori es two through four above may be made wi th approval 
from the Di rector of LGBT Studi es. 

• No course earned with a grade below "C-" will count toward the mi nor in LGBT Studies. 

• Students may use a maxi mum of six credits (or two courses) to satisfy the requi rements of both thei r maj or and 
the mi nor i n L G BT Studi es. H owever, courses taken to compl ete the rri nor i n L G BT Studi es may not be used to 
satisfy the requi rements of another rri nor. 

• No more than si x of the requi red credi ts (or two courses) may be taken at an i nsti tuti on other than the U ni versi ty 
of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. H owever, at I east si x upper-di vi si on credi ts appl i ed to the rri nor must be taken atthis 
university. 

• Students must decl are the mi nor i n L G BT Studi es to the D i rector of L G BT Studi es one year pri or to thei r 
i ntended graduati on to assure appropri ate advi si ng and record- keepi ng. 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 195 



Letters and Sciences 

1117 Hornbake Library, 301-314-8418 

www.ltsc.umd.edu 

asklt5c@umd.edu 

Assistant Dean/Director: Deborah Reid Bryant, Ph. D. 

www.ltsc.umd.edu 

General Advising: 301-314-8418 or 8419 

Pre-Law Advising: prelaw@umd.edu 

Credit-by-Exam: 301-314-8418 

L etters and Sci ences i s the academi c home for students expl ori ng a vari ety of f i el ds before sel ecti ng a maj or, for 

post-baccal aureate students taki ng additi onal course work, and for non-degree seeki ng students taki ng undergraduate 

courses. L etters and Sci ences may al so serve as the academi c home for students compl eb ng requi rements for entry i nto 

a L i mi ted E nrol I ment Program. L etters and Sci ences advi sors hel p students to sel ect and schedul e courses, pi an 

academi c programs, and I earn about campus- wi de resources. L etters and Sci ences col I aborates cl osel y wi th col I ege 

advi si ng offices, academic departments, and programs across campus and provi des a coordi nated advi si ng network that 

features: 

Choosing a Major 

L etters and Sci ences students recei ve i nf ormati on about and referral to a wi de range of academi c programs and servi ces 
i ncl udi ng sped al i zed workshop sessi ons. L etters and Sci ences staff sped al i ze i n assi sti ng students to devel op strategi es 
and pi ans for enteri ng L i mi ted E nrol I ment Programs. 

Markets and Society 

M arkets and Soci ety is a program for enteri ng freshmen i nterested i n expl ori ng the worl d of busi ness. The M arkets and 
Soci ety Program hel ps students to I earn about the f i el d of busi ness, ref i ne the r career goal s, and i nteract wi th other 
students who share thei r i nterests. 

I nterim Advising Program 

N ewl y admi tted transfer students wi th more than 60 credi ts, who were unsuccessful i n gai ni ng admi ssi on to a L i mi ted 
E nrol I ment Program, recei ve advi si ng and assi stance from a L etters and Sci ences prof essi onal staff member duri ng 
thei rfirst two semesters on campus. F or thi s group of students, the U ni versi ty wai ves the requi rement that al I students 
must decl are a maj or by 60 credi ts. 

Pre-Law Advising 

L etters and Sci ences offers sped al i zed advi si ng for students i nterested i n I aw. F or further i nf ormati on, see the secti on 
on Pre-Law Advi si ng i n this catalog and visit www.prelaw.umd.edu 

Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MC UR) 

2100D (2nd Floor) McKeldin Library, 301-314-6786 
www.ugresearch.umd.edu 
ugresearch@umd.edu 
Director: Francis DuVinage 

The M aryland Center for Undergraduate Research (MCUR) is an initiative of the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate 
Studi es. Created as a resource for students and faculty, the Center serves as a cl eari nghouse for both on-campus and 
off-campus research opportuni ti es for undergraduates. A ddi ti onal I y, the Center serves as a forum where faculty 
members can share di ff erent model s for i ncorporati ng undergraduate students i nto research programs, and ways of 
i nf usi ng undergraduate research i nto the curri cul um. 

M aj or programs of the M C U R i ncl ude M ary I and Student Researchers, whi ch permi ts f acul ty to list research 
opportuni ti es open to undergraduates duri ng the academi c year, and M aryl and Summer Schol ars, whi ch provi des 
fundi ng for students to conduct summer research (on campus or el sewhere i n the U S or abroad as needed) under the 
mentorshi p of M aryl and faculty members. Students new to research as we! I as students with previ ous research 
experi ence parti ci pate i n these programs. 

Orientation 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 196 



1102 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-314-8217 

www.orientsition.umd.edu 

Director: Gerry Strumpf 

The goal of Orientation is to introduce new students to the University of Maryland community. The Orientation Office 
offers a wi de range of transi ti onal programmi ng and servi ces for students and thei r f ami I i es as they prepare to attend 
thel) ni versi ty of M ary I and . 

New Student Orientation 

Held pri or to the semester a student enrol I sat the University of Maryland, new student orientation for first-time 
freshmen normal I y covers two days; ori entati on for new transfer students covers one day. Duri ng N ew Student 
Ori entati on, i ndi vi dual s meet wi th representati ves from thei r academi c col I ege for advi si ng and course schedul i ng. 
U ndergraduate Ori entati on A dvi sors i ntroduce students to academi c and student I i f e at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, 
i ncl udi ng student campus servi ces and resources, and opportuni ti es f or i nvol vement on campus. 

Parent Orientation 

Parents of new U ni versi ty of M aryl and students are strongl y encouraged to attend a one- day program sped f i cal I y 
desi gned to i ntroduce them to the academi c, soci al , and cul tural opportuni ti es of the uni versi ty and to better prepare 
them for the i ssues that are I i kel y to affect thei r son or daughter throughout thei r matri cul ati on at the U ni versi ty . 

Terp Trips 

Terp Tri ps focus on the conti nui ng transiti on of parents. Offered to parents on the second day of freshman ori entati on, 
these one-day programs combi ne a tri p to an area attracti on with connect] ons to other parents and a campus faculty or 
staff host. 

I introduction to the University Seminars 

The Ori entati on Of f i ce coordi nates new student semi nar courses, U N I V 100 and 101. These courses i ntroduce students 
totheworidof higher education and, more specifically, to theU ni versi ty of Maryland. Course topics include 
career/major exploration, successful studying and test- taking strategies, diversity, and involvement within the 
university. 

PreCdlege Procj-ams 

3103 Susquehanna Hall, 301-405-6776 

www.precol lege.umd.edu 

pre-col I ege@umd.edu 

Executive Di rector: Georgette Hardy De) esus 

Upward Bound Programs: 301-405-6776 

Upward Bound-M ath and Science Program (UB-M S): 301-405-1224 

The U ni versi ty of M aryl and Pre-Col I ege Programs i n U ndergraduate Studi es i s compri sed of three federal I y and state 
supported programs: 

Two Upward Bound Programs (UB) and 

U pward Bound-M ath and Sci ence Program (U B-M S) . 

These programs generate the ski 1 1 s and moti vati on necessary for success i n post-secondary educati on. They i rrmerse 
hi gh school parti ci pants i n ri gorous academi c i nstructi on, tutori ng, counsel i ng, and i nnovati ve educati onal experi ences 
throughout the school year and duri ng the si x-week summer resi denti al program. Pre-Col I ege Programs are part of the 
Federal TRIO Programs that provide educati onal opportunity outreach programs desi gned to motivate and support 
students from disadvantaged backgrounds. 

The U B Programs are open to I ow-i ncome and/or f i rst-generati on col I ege bound hi gh school students i n grades 9 
through 12, who demonstrate an academic need and want to pursue a four- year postsecondary education. Eligible 
students must attend target hi gh school s i n Pri nee G eorge's and M ontgomery C ounti es. H i gh school pri nci pal s, 
teachers, and counsel ors recommend students to the program. 

E I i gi bi I i ty f or the U pward B ound Programs requi re that students attend N orthwood High School i n M ontgomery 
C ounty . B I adensburg, C entral , H i gh Poi nt, Parkdal e, or N orthwestern H i gh School s i n P ri nee G eorge's C ounty . 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 197 



The U B-M S is open to students i n grades 9 through 12, who demonstrate an academi c need and want to pursue 
post-secondary education programs in fields related to mathematics and science. U B-M S recruits high school students 
who have successful I y compl eted A I gebra I , and attend Potomac and F ai rmont H ei ghts H i gh School s i n Pri nee 
George's County, MD; WatkinsMill High School in Montgomery County, MD, and Bell High School in Washington, 
DC. 

Pre-Transfer Advising 

0110 Hornbake, 301.405.9449 or 9448 
www.transferadvisi ng.umd.edu/ 
transf eradvi si ng@umd.edu 
Assistant Dean: LisaKiely 

The Pre-Transfer Advi si ng Program promotes academi c success and excel I ence through assessi ng the readi ness of 
students to transfer to U M and esti mati ng the r ti me to degree compl eti on. Pre-Transfer Advi sors provi de advi si ng for 
students i nterested in transferring from community col leges as well as four- year schools. Advisors also work closely 
wi th staff at the M aryl and communi ty col I eges. 

National Scholarship Office 

2403 M ari e M ount Hal 1 , 301-314-1289 
www.schol arshi ps.umd.edu 
schol arshi ps@umd.edu 
Director: Francis DuVinage, Ph.D. 

The N ati onal Schol arshi ps Off i ce at the U ni versity of M aryl and, Col I ege Park ai ms to provi de undergraduates with the 

best possi bl e i nf ormati on, gui dance and support as they I earn about and appl y for nati onal schol arshi ps. 

N ati onal schol arshi ps are competi ti ve, presti gi ous awards that provi de opportuni ti es and support f or a wi de range of 

enri chi ng experi ences, i ncl udi ng study abroad, graduate study (and someti mes undergraduate study al so), federal 

employment teaching, research, and publicservice National scholarships are looking for students (with or without 

f i nanci al need) who are devel opi ng strong i nterests and goal s - academi c and extracurri cul ar - and who want to take 

advantage of every construct] ve opportuni ty that wi 1 1 hel p them reach the r obj ecti ves. J ust as each nati onal schol arshi p 

offers a di ff erent ki nd of opportuni ty, each i s al so I ooki ng for a di ff erent range of strengths and i nterests in its 

appl i cants. I f you devel op a strong academi c record, are thoughtful about your choi ces and devote yoursel f to acti vi ti es 

you care about, you may wel I f i nd one or more schol arshi p opportuni ti es of i nterest to you. 

The N ati onal Schol arshi ps Off i ce stri ves to make I eami ng about and appl yi ng for nati onal schol arshi ps an enl i ghteni ng 

experi ence. I n addi ti on to provi di ng i nf ormati on about nati onal schol arshi ps through our websi te, through group 

presentati ons and through i ndi vi dual advi si ng, we al so provi de i ndi vi dual i zed gui dance and support at every stage of 

the appl i cati on process. We i nvi te you to vi si t our websi te and to make an appoi ntment wi th us to I earn more about 

nati onal schol arshi ps that may hel p you attai n your goals. 

Student Success Office 

0110C Hornbake, www.studentsuccess.umd.edu 

rr-admit@umd.edu 

L i sa K i el y, A ssi stant Dean 

The Student Success Off i ce i s a cl eari nghouse for servi ces and resources to assi st students i n the compl eti on of the r 
undergraduate degrees. This i ncl udes: 



Coordi nati ng reenrol I ment 

Central izi ng tutori ng resources 

M anagi ng data from exiti ng students 

Provi di ng I eadershi p on other retenti on i ni ti ati ves 



For more in fo rmation, please9ee www.studentsiKXPflSLumd.edu . 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 198 



THE UNIVERSITIES AT SHADY GROVE 

Room 1100 Cam lie Kendall Academe Center building I II, 301-738-6000 
www.shadygrove. umd. edu 
shadygrove@umd.edu 

9636 Gudelsky Drive Rockvi I le M D 20850 

301-738-6000 

www.shadygrove umd. edu 

USG Executive Director and Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, USM: 
Dr. Stewart L. Edel stein 

The Universities at Shady Grove (USG) is a regional higher education center created under the auspices of the 
U ni versi ty System of M ary I and. Si nee i ts i ncepti on i n 2000, U SG has been transformed from a I ocati on for part-ti me 
eveni ng i nstructi on i nto a vi brant center off eri ng cl asses duri ng dayti me, eveni ngs, and weekends i n both f ul I -ti me and 
part-ti me formats. U SG currentl y serves more than 4,000 graduate and undergraduate students, wi th more than 1,400 
undergraduates enrol led in dayti me programs. Nine University System of Maryland (USM) degree- granting institutions 
col I aborate to offer the r top degree programs, as wel I as certi f i cate and conti nui ng educati on programs, at one 
conveni ent I ocati on i n M ontgomery County. 

With coursework begi nni ng at the j uni or I evel , U SG provi des al I the presti ge and benefits of a M aryl and educati on 
duri ng a student's f i nal two years of undergraduate study. M ost credit earned at M aryl and community col I eges wi 1 1 
transfer, and students can choose from a vari ety of maj ors, wi th cl asses offered at ti mes that meet the r schedul es. At 
the U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove campus, students work cl osel y wi th professors from nati onal I y ranked academi c 
programs. U SG provi des students wi th access to the f i nest programs of M aryl and's top publ i c uni versi ti es i n an 
atmosphere that features smal I cl asses, customi zed student servi ces and state-of-the-art faci I iti es f or teachi ng and 
I eami ng. Students can al so take advantage of a growi ng number of soci al events, communi ty servi ce acti vi ti es and 
student I eadershi p opportuniti es. 

The U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park i s one of the powerful partners that make up U SG . Students can earn a 
U ni versi ty of M aryl and, C ol I ege Park degree at U SG and eel ebrate Terrapi n tradi ti ons no matter whi ch campus they 
call home. TheUniversity of Maryland, Col I ege Park offers eight undergraduate degrees within five different 
academi c departments at Shady Grove 

Bidocjcal Sciences Prog-am (BSC I ) 

The Universities at Shady Grove, Building 2, rooom4082, 301-738-6007 
chembi o. umd. edu/undergraduateprograms/bi ol ogi cal sci encesprogramatshadygrove 

Dr. Beth Parent Director, Biological Sciences Program, the Universities at Shady Grove 
The Maj or 

Biological Sciences at the University of Maryland at the Universities at Shady Gro^e 

The Biological Sciences Program at the University of M aryl and offers a degree program in General Biology (GENB) 
at the U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove. The B i ol ogi cal Sci ences Program at Shady G rove offers the A dvanced Program 
courses normal I y taken i n the j uni or and seni or years. 

All B i ol ogi cal Sci ences maj ors compl ete a common sequence of i ntroductory and supporti ng courses referred to as the 
B asi c Program F or students matri cul ati ng at the U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove most of these i ntroductory and supporti ng 
courses are taken at a communi ty col I ege or at another four-year i nsrj turj on pri or to admi ssi on to the B i ol ogi cal 
Sci ences Program. Dependi ng on space avai I abl e, students who matri cul ated at Col I ege Park may transfer to the Shady 
G rove Program i n thei r j uni or year, where they may compl ete the A dvanced Program i n General B i ol ogy. 

Requirements for the Bidogjcal Sciences Major in General Biology (GENB) at Shady Grove 

Courses equivalent to these to be taken at an institution that offers lower level course work 
I. General Education Program Requirements 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 199 



II. Basic Program in Biological Sciences 



BSCI105 


Principles of Biology I 


4 


BSCI106 


Principles of Biology II 


4 


BSCI223 


General Microbiology 


3 


BSCI222 


Principles of Genetics 


4 


MATH130 or 


Calculus for Life Sciences I or 


3 


MATH140 


Calculus I 


4 


MATH131 or 


Calculus for Life Sciences II or 




MATH141 


Calculus II 


4 


CHEM13 1/132 


General Chemistry I w/Lab 


4 


CHEM23 1/232 


General Chemistry II w/Lab 


4 


CHEM24 1/242 


Organic Chemistry II w/ Lab 


4 


CHEM27 1/272* 


General Chemistry II w/ Lab 


4 



* CHEM272 Bioanalytical Chemistry Lab is not offered at most institutions. Students accepted into the UMCP Shady Grove 
Biological Sciences may substitute a General Chemistry II Lab for this course 

III. Courses taken at the Universities at Shady Grove 

PH YS 1 2 1 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PH YS 1 22 Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

GENB Advanced Program in General Biology 27 minimum 

ELECT Electives 20-25 

Total credits required to graduate 120 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory during each pre-registration period for all Biological Sciences majors. Advising for students interested in or 
enrolled in the Shady Grove Program is available from the Director. Call 301-738-6007 for an advising appointment. 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business, Shady Grove 

www. rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ 

Dean: Dr. G. Anandalingam 

Associate Dean(s): Victor M ul I i ns 

Director of Programs at Shady Grove LukeGlasgow 

College Park Location: 1570 Van Munching Hall, 301-405-2286 

Shady Grove Location: Building 1 1 1 , Room 5147, 301-738-6079 

The Robert H . Srri th School of B usi ness i s an i nternati onal I y recogni zed I eader i n management educati on and research 
for the di gi tal economy. The f acul ty are schol ars, teachers, and prof essi onal I eaders wi th a comrri tment to superi or 
educati on i n busi ness and management, sped alizing in accounti ng, f i nance, i nf ormati on systems, operati ons 
management management and organization, marketing, logistics, transportation and supply chai n management TheSmitr 
SrritrSchool is accredited by AACSB International -TheAssociation to Advance Collegiate Schoolsof Business, the 
prerni er accrediti ng agency for bachel or's, master's and doctoral degree programs i n busi ness adrni ni strati on and 
accounting, http://www.aacsb.edu. 

The Srri th School of B usi ness offers students the opportuni ty to compl ete the j uni or-seni or curri cul um i n four maj ors at 
the Shady Grove campus including(l) Accounting; (2) International Business; (3) Management- Entrepreneurship 
Track; and (4) M arketi ng. F or detai I s on the maj ors offered at Shady G rove vi si t 
http://www. rhsrri th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 200 



Admission Requirements 

A 1 1 students appl yi ng for admi ssi on to the Robert H . Smi th School of B usi ness as transfer students, whether i nternal 
transfers already enrol led at UMCP or external transfer students entering the university for the first time, will be 
subject to competitive admission for a limited number of spaces in the Smith School at either the Col lege Park or 
Shady Grove location. For complete detail son admission to the Smith School @ Shady Grove visit 
http://www. rhsrri th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/adrri ssi ons. aspx. 

Statement of Pd icy on Transfer of Credit from Community Colleges 

1 1 i s the practi ce of the Smi th School of B usi ness to consi der for transfer from a regi onal I y accredi ted communi ty 
col I ege onl y the f ol I owi ng courses i n busi ness admi ni strati on: an i ntroductory busi ness course, busi ness stati sti cs, 
i ntroducti on to computi ng (equi val ent to B M GT 201), or el ementary account] ng. Thus, i t i s anti ci pated that students 
transf erri ng from another regi onal I y accredi ted i nsti tuti on to Shady G rove wi 1 1 have devoted the maj or share of the r 
acaderri c effort bel ow the j uni or year to the compl eti on of basi c requi rements i n the I i beral arts. A total of 60 semester 
hours from a communi ty col I ege may be appl i ed toward a degree from the Smi th School of B usi ness. 

Other I nstitutions 

The Smith School of Busi ness normal I y accepts transfer credits from regi onal I y accredited four-year i nsti tuti ons. 
J uni or- and seni or- 1 evel busi ness courses are accepted from col I eges accredi ted by the A ssoci ati on to A dvance 
Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Junior- and senior- level busi ness courses from other than 
AACSB-accredited schools are evaluated on a course- by- course basisto determine transferability. 

The Srri th School of B usi ness requi res that at I east 50 percent of the busi ness and management credit hours requi red 
for a busi ness degree be earned at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park. 

Undergraduate Degree Requirements/Degree Options 

U pon compl eti on of al I degree requi rements, students at the Smi th School at Shady G rove wi 1 1 earn a B achel or of 
Sci ence ( B . S. ) degree from the Robert H . Srri th School of B usi ness at the U ni versi ty of M aryl and Col I ege Park. I n 
addition, the Smith School of Business awards M aster of Business Administration (M .B.A.), M aster of Science (M .S.), 
and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Information concerning adrri ssi on to the M.B. A. orM.S. program is avail able at 
www.rhsmith.umd.edu. 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (al I curri cul a) 

At I east 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of acaderri c work requi red for graduati on must be i n busi ness and 
management subj ects. A mi ni mum of 57 hours of the requi red 120 hours must be i n 300- or 400-1 evel courses. Fifty 
percent of the requi red BM GT credit hours must be compl eted at the Smith School of Busi ness (Col I ege Park or Shady 
G rove campus) . Students are requi red to have an overal I cumul ati ve grade poi nt average of 2. ( C average) i n al I 
university course work. 

F reshman- Sophomore School Requi rements 

BM GT110 1 ntroducti on to the Busi ness Val ue Chai n (3 credits) 

BMGT220 Principles of Accounting I (3 credits) 

BM GT221 Principles of Accounting 1 1 (3 credits) 

ECON 200 Pri nci pi es of M i croeconomi cs (3/4 credits) 

ECON 201 Pri nci pi es of M acroeconorri cs (3/4 credits) 

One from 3/4 credits 

M ATH220 Elementary Calculus I 

MATH 140 Calculus I 

Onefrom 3 credits 

B M GT2301 B usi ness Stati sti cs 

B M GT2312 Stati sti cal M ode! s for B usi ness 

Onefrom 3 credits 

COM M 100 Foundations of Speech Communication 

COM M 107 Speech Communication 

COM M 200 Criti cal Thi nki ng and Speaki ng 

Total: 24-27 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 201 



1 The foil owing courses are approved substitutes for BMGT230: BIOM301, ECON321, EDMS451, GEOG305, 
PSYC200,andSOCY201. 

2 The foil owing courses are approved substitutes for BMGT231: ENEE324, ENME392, orSTAT400. 

J unior-Senior School Requirements 

B M GT301 1 ntroducti on to I nf ormati on Systems (3 credi ts) 

B M GT340 B usi ness F i nance (3 credi ts) 

B M GT350 M arketi ng Pri nci pi es and Organi zati on (3 credi ts) 

BM GT364 M anagement and Organizational Theory (3 credits) 

BMGT367 Career Search Strategies in Business (1 credit) 

B M GT380 B usi ness L aw (3 credi ts) 

BMGT391 Leadership in Action (1 credit) 

B M GT495 B usi ness Pol i ci es (3 credi ts) 

B M GT499 A dvanced Topi cs i n B usi ness ( 1 credi t) 

Total: 21 

Economics Requirements 3-6 credits 

3-6 credits of approved upper-level economics courses are required by the Smith School of Business. Visit 
http://www. rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ to vi ew trie sped f i c requi rements for each maj or offered at the 
Smith School at Shady Grove 

Major Requirements 

I n addi ti on to the Srri th School of B usi ness B achel or of Sci ence requi rements I i sted above, general I y another 18-24 
credi ts are requi red for each maj or. See http://www. rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ to vi ew the sped f i c 
requi rements for each maj or offered at the Smith School at Shady Grove 

Additional Information 

F or more i nf ormati on on the Smi th School of B usi ness undergraduate program at Shady G rove vi si t 
www. rhsmi th. umd. edu/undergrad/shadygrove/ 

B A. in Cornmunication at Shady Graze 

Carrille Kendall Academic Center (Universities at Shady Grove), 

9636 Gudelsky Drive 

Rockville, MD 20750 

301-738-6208 

www.shadygrove. umd. edu/programs/undergraduate/communi cati on/umcp/communi cati on.cf m 

Chair: E.Toth 

Director: L. Waks (Director, Senior Lecturer) 

Coordinator: Lindsi Baltz( Program Coordinator) 

Coordi nator: J ul i e Gowi n (Outreach Coordi nator) 

Professors: E. Fink, R. Gaines, J . Klumpp, S. Parry-Giles, T. Parry-Giles, A. Wolvin 

Associate Professors: L. Aldoory, D. H ample 

Assistant Professors: S. Kharris, B. Liu, M. Liu, K. Maddux, N. Ofulue, 

Lecturers: R. Coleman (Lecturer), W. Lawson (Lecturer), S. Simon (Lecturer), J . Tenney (Lecturer), R. Toth (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: J. Fahnestock (ENGL), A. Kruglanski (PSYC), D. Rosenfelt(WMST) 

Affi Nate Associate Professors: M. Gelfand (PSYC), S. McDanie! (KNES) 

Prof essors Emeriti: J. Grunig, L. Grunig 

Visiting Faculty: K. Kendall (Res Prof, Visit Prof) 

The Major at Shady Grove 

The department offers an exci ti ng curri cul um that prepares students for academi c and prof essi onal careers i n busi ness, 
government health, education, social and human services, and related fields. Courses offered by the department 
i ncl ude persuasi on and soci al i nf I uence, rhetori c and the anal ysi s of messages, communi cati on and new medi a, di gi tal 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 202 



communication, organizational communication, public relations strategies, and intercultural communication. All 
students i n the program at Shady Grove are requi red to complete mandatory advisi ng each semester. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

U pon compl eti on of the degree program i n Communi cati on, students shoul d be abl e to demonstrate the f ol I owi ng 
knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

1. An ability todisti ngui sh among a vari ety of theoreti cal approaches i n the communi cati on di sci pi i ne and use them 
appropri atel y and eff ecti vel y i n academi c work. 

2. A n abi I i ty to conduct research and wri te research reports empl oyi ng sod al sci enti f i c and/or humani sti c approaches i n 
the communi cati on di sci pi i ne. 

3. An ability to argue clearly and effectively in a speech. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership unites research, education, and public engagement to 

foster democrati c communi cati on by a di verse peopl e. See www. comm center, umd. edu. 

The Center for Ri sk Communi cati on Research (CRCR) advances di al ogue and understandi ng about communi cati on's 

rol e i n control I i ng and preventi ng ri sk; about how publ i cs percei ve ri sk communi cati on; and about the politi cal , 

econorri c and soci al contexts for ri sk communi cati on. Schol ars associ ated with the CRCR exami ne health, food safety, 

securi ty, and envi ronmental ri sks. See www. comm. ri skcenter. umd. edu. 

The department's M edi a Center at Col I ege Park i s desi gned to provi de one-on-one tutori ng and i nstructi onal support to 

further students' oral communication ski I Is and confidence. The Media Center is equipped with camerasand recording 

equi pment to tape speeches and presentati ons for practi ce and cri ti que Students may al so uti I i ze resources avai I abl e at 

Shady G rove through the Off i ce of I nf ormati on Technol ogy. 

Admission to the Major 

Communi cati on is a Limited Enrollment Program in which applicants should have an overall GPA of 2.7 of better, and 
a grade of "C-" or better in each of the three courses specifically required by the major (COM M 250, COM M 107, 
Stati sti cs, or the r equi val ents) . A ppl i cants shoul d al so attai n j uni or standi ng (56 or more transf erabl e col I ege credi ts) 
by the ti me of enrol I ment. F or more i nf ormati on on admi ssi on and I ower- 1 evel coursework requi rements, pi ease vi si t 
the Communi cati on web site or theTransfer Credit Center website at www.tce.umd.edu. Requi rements for the maj or are 
as follows: 

a. Compl ete 50% of the general educati on requi rements, i ncl udi ng F undamental Studi es requi rements i n M athemati cs 
and English. 

b Compl ete one of the foil owing courses withagradeof "C-" or better: BMGT230, CCJS2O0, EDMS451, 
PSY C2O0, SOCY 201, STAT100 or equi val ent. 

c. Compl ete COMM 107, COMM 200, COMM 230, or equivalent with a grade of "C-" or better 

d. CompleteCOMM250orequivalentwithagradeof "C-" orbetterand 

e. A cumulative GPA of 2.7 or better 

Students may repeat onl y one of the Gateway courses and that may be repeated onl y once i n the r attempt to meet the 
requi rements. 

Transfer Students 

I ntemal and external transfer students who meet the G ateway requi rements sped f i ed above and have a cumul ati ve 
GPA of 2.7 in all college-level coursework may apply to the program. 

Appeals 

A 1 1 students may appeal admi ssi on deci si ons. Those students deni ed admi ssi on may appeal to the uni versi ty's Of f i ce of 
U ndergraduate A dmi ssi ons. 

Requirements for the Maj or 



6. The Col I eges and School s 



Page 203 



The course of study for a Communi cati on maj or must sati sfy al I of the fol I owi ng requi rements: 



COM M 107 Oral Communi cati on: Pri nci pi es and Practi ces, OR 



COMM200 Critical Thinking and Speaking, OR 



COM M 230 A rgumentati on and Debate 



COM M 250 I ntroducti on to Communi cati on I nqui ry 



COM M 400 Research M ethods i n Communi cati on 



COM M 401 I nterpreb ng Strategi c Discourse 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Communication StudiesTrack 



COM M 402 Communi cati on Theory and Process 



One from 



3 
3 



COMM420 Theories of Group Discussion 



COM M 424 Communi cati on i n Compl ex Organi zati ons 



COM M 425 N egoti ati on and Conf I i ct M anagement 



COM M 426 Conflict Management 



COM M 435 Theori es of I nterpersonal Communi cati on 



COM M 470 Listening 



COM M 475 Persuasi on 



COM M 477 Discourse Analysis 



COM M 482 I ntercultural Communi cati ons 



One from 



COM M 330 A rgumentati on and Public Pol icy 



6. The Col I eges and School s 



Page 204 



COM M 360 The Rhetoric of Black America 



COM M 450 A nci ent and M edi eval Rhetori cal Theory 



COM M 451 Renai ssance & M odern Rhetori c Theory 



COM M453 The Power of Discourse i n American Life 



COM M 455 Speechwriti ng 



COMM460 Public Life in American Communities, 1634-1900 



COM M461 Voices of Public Leadership in the Twentieth Century 



COM M 469 The Di scourse of Soci al M overrents 



COMM471 Public Communication Campaigns 



COM M476 Language, Communication, and Action 



COMM 



COMM Elective 



COMM300/400 Upper Level COMM Electives 

One Statistical Analysis from 
STAT 100 E I ementary Stati sti cs and Probabi I i ty 



12 
3-4 



PSY C200 Statistical M ethods i n Psychol ogy 



SOCY 201 I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 



BMGT230 Business Stati sties 



E D M S451 ' ntroc ' uct ' on t0 E ducafj onal Stati sti cs or an equi val ent 

course- see advisor 



One Structural Analysis of Language from 



LING200 Introductory Linguistics 



H ESP120 I ntroducti on to L i ngui sti cs 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 205 



ANTH380 Culture and Discourse or an equivalent course- see advisor 



Corrmini cations Studies: Courses related to 
COU RSES Communi cati on Studi es i n one department other than 9 

COMM 



Notes 

• Because the departments curri cul um changes over ti me, the department's U ndergraduate Di rector may approve 
other appropri ate Communi cati on courses to meet the requi rements for each track. 

• Courses requi red for the Communi cati on maj or, but taken outsi de COM M , may be used to sati sfy general 
educati on requi rements. 

• Only 3 credits of COM M 386 may apply toward the major. 

• No course grade be! ow the grade of C- may count toward the maj or. 

• An overal I G PA of 2.0 i n the maj or i s requi red for graduati on. 

Advising 

Advising is avail able throughout the year in the Carri lie Kendall Academic Center, Suite 5119. Students should check 
Testudo for the r regi strati on date and for any mandatory advi si ng bl ocks. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Research experi ences i ncl ude assi sti ng on f acul ty research proj ects, parti ci pati ng i n sped al team research proj ects, and 
working with the department's Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership and Center for Risk 
Communication Research. 

Fieldwork Opportunities 

To further enhance I earni ng and career trai ni ng, the department i ncorporates sped al hands- on cl asses such as H eal th 
Communi cati on Campai gns, V i sual Communi cati on, Web Desi gn, and PR Event PI anni ng. The department al so 
strongl y promotes i nternshi p and servi ce I earni ng opportuni ti es wi th I ocal and state busi nesses and i nsti tuti ons, and 
encourages students' parti ci pati on i n student- run cl ubs. 

I nternshi ps 

The department's i nternshi p program hel ps communi cati on maj ors gai n prof essi onal experi ence, bui I d a prof essi onal 
portfol i o, and take the f i rst steps toward a career. The department structures its i nternshi p program around a course, 
COM M 386: Experiential Learning, offered each school term. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Soci al and academi c acti vi ti es are avai I abl e to students by parti ci pati ng i n the f ol I owi ng student organi zati ons: the 
Undergraduate Communication Association, the Lambda Pi Eta Honor Society, and the M aryland chapter of the Public 
Rel ati ons Student Soci ety of A meri ca. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The department offers the Chai m and M i riam Bentzlovitch Schol arshi p to students who exhi bit academi c excel I ence 
Each year the department distri butes a cal I for appl i cations through e-mai I . 

Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

5105 Carri lie Kendall Academe Center, 301-738-6307 
http://www.shadygrove.umd.edu/academi cs/undergraduate/cri mi nol ogy 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 206 



ccj susg@umd.edu 

9630 Gudelsky Drive, Room 5103 

www.shadygrove. umd. edu/academi cs/undergraduate/cri mi nol ogy 

Chair: S. Simpson 

Shady Grove Program Director: W. Stickle, Ph.D. 

Lecturers: C. Roberts White, N . Romeiser, S. Eastman, R. Shusko, M . J anney, J . Conroy 

The Major 

C ri rri nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce encompasses the study of both the causes of, and responses to cri me. 1 1 i nvol ves 
studyi ng i ndi vi dual , group, and mass behavi or, as wel I as the i nsti tuti ons, prof essi ons, and I aws that exi st to detect, 
control , and amel i orate the effects of cri me. A s a di sci pi i ne, cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce i s si tuated at the nexus of 
other soci al sci ence di sci pi i nes such as sod ol ogy, psychol ogy, and government i n addi ti on to publ i c pol i cy and I egal 
studies. 

The University of Maryland, College Park offers its Bachelor of Arts in Criminology & Criminal J usticeatthe 
U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove. Students transfer i nto thi s Program after compl eti ng thei r freshman and sophomore years 
el sewhere, typi cal I y at a j uni or col I ege. Through thi s Program, students compl ete thei r j uni or- and seni or-year 
coursework at U SG wi th the opti on to attend f ul I - or part-ti me. U pon compl eti on of thi s Program, students are awarded 
a U ni versi ty of M aryl and, Col I ege Park B .A . degree. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

H avi ng compl eted the CCJ S degree program students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

• Students wi 1 1 demonstrate basi c knowl edge of maj or cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce content areas. 

• Students wi 1 1 demonstrate a basi c knowl edge of descri pti ve and i nf erenti al stati sti cs appropri ate to the soci al 
sciences. 

• Students wi 1 1 demonstrate competence i n basi c soci al sci ence research methods. 

Requirements for the Maj or 

The major in Criminology & Criminal J usti ce comprises 30 hours of coursework in criminology and criminal justice 
E i ghteen ( 18) hours of supporti ng sequence sel ected from a I i st of soci al and behavi oral sci ence courses are requi red 
(li st i s available in the CCJ S advising off ice and on the department website). No grade lower than a C- may be used 
toward the maj or. Students must have a mi ni mum 2.0 cumul ati ve grade poi nt average across al I courses, i ncl udi ng the 
supporti ng sequence, used to sati sfy maj or degree requi rements. N i ne (9) hours of the supporti ng sequence must be at 
the 300/400 1 eve!. Inaddition, MATH 111 or higher (MATH 220, MATH140orSTAT100, but not MATH 113 or 
MATH 115) and CCJ S200 (or an approved course in social statistics) must be compl eted with a grade of C or better. A 
grade of 'C or better i s requi red i n M ATH 111 as a prerequi site to CCJ S200. 

Major Requirements Credits 

Introduction to Cri rri nal Justice 3 

Criminology 3 

Criminal Law in Action 3 

Criminological and Cri mi nal Justice Research Methods 3 

Concepts of L aw E nf orcement A drri ni strati on 3 

Juvenile Delinquency 3 

CCJ S E I ecti ves (3 courses) 9 

One from 3 
Cri me and Del i nquency Preventi on 
Treatment of C ri rri nal s and Del i nquents 
Contemporary Cri rri nol ogi cal Theory 

Total Credits 30 
Supporting Sequence 



CCJS100 


CCJ S105 


CCJS230 


CCJS300 


CCJS340 


CCJ S350 


CCJ SELECT 


CCJ S451 


CCJ S452 


CCJ S454 



6. The Col I eges and School s 



Page 207 



SUPPORT Lower or Upper level courses from approved list (3 courses) 9 

SU PPORT U L U pper I evel courses from approved list (3 courses) 9 

One from 3-4 

M ATH 111 I ntroducti on to Probabi I i ty 

MATH220 Elementary Calculus I 

MATH 140 Calculus I 

STAT100 Elementary Statistics and Probability 

One from 3-4 

CCJ S200 Statistics for Criminology and Criminal J ustice 

ECON 321 Economi c Stati sti cs 

PSY C200 Stati sti cal M ethods i n Psychol ogy 

SOCY201 Introductory Stati sties for Sociology 

BMGT230 Business Stati sties 

Total credits- Major and Supporting 54 

Electivesfor CCJ S MajorsCmast courses are 3 credits) 

CCJ S234 L aw of C ri mi nal I nvesti gati on 

CCJ S310 Cri mi nal I nvesti gati ons 

CCJS320 I ntroducti on to Criminalistics 

CCJ S330 Contemporary C ri rri nol ogi cal I ssues 

CCJ S331 Contemporary L egal Pol i cy I ssues 

CCJS332 Major Transitions: From Undergraduate to Professional 

CCJ S352 Drugs and Cri me 

CCJ S357 I ndustri al and Retai I Securi ty A drri ni strati on 

CCJ S359 FieldTraining in Criminology and Corrections 

CCJS360 Victimology 

CCJ S370 Race, C ri me and C ri ni nal J usti ce 

CCJ S386 Experi enti al L earni ng 

CCJS388H I ndependent Reading Course in Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal Justice- Honors 

CCJS389H I ndependent Research in Cri rri nol ogy and Cri mi nal Justice- Honors 

CCJ S398 L aw E nf orcement and F i el d Trai ni ng 

CCJ S399 I ndependent Study i n Cri mi nol ogy and Cri mi nal J usti ce 

CCJ S400 Cri rri nal Courts 

CCJS432 Law of Corrections 

CCJ S444 A dvanced L aw E nf orcement A drri ni strati on 

CCJ S451 Cri me and Del i nquency Preventi on 

CCJ S452 Treatment of C ri rri nal s and Del i nquents 

CCJS453 White Collar and Organized Cri me 

CCJ S454 Contemporary C ri rri nol ogi cal Theory 

CCJ S455 Dynarri cs of PI anned Change i n Cri mi nal J usti ce I 

CCJ S456 Dynarri cs of PI anned Change i n Cri rri nal J usti ce 1 1 

CCJ S457 Comparati ve C ri rri nol ogy and C ri mi nal J usti ce 

CCJ S461 Psychol ogy of Cri mi nal Behavi or 

CCJ S462 Sped al Probl ems i n Securi ty A drri ni strati on 

CCJ S498 Selected Topics in Criminology and Criminal J ustice 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 208 



Other Requirements for the Major 

The CCJ S Department enforces al I prerequisites and does not oversubscri be students to courses that are cl osed. 

Advising 

All maj ors are strongl y encouraged to see an advi sor at I east once each semester. A dvi si ng i s avai I abl e by appoi ntment 
intheCarri lie Kendall Academic Center (Building II I), room5105. Students must complete all course prerequisites 
and obtai n department permission from CCJ S A dvi sing to enrol I in mostCCJS classes. Call 301-738-6307 or email 
ccjsusg@crimumd.edu. 

Internships 

Requirements for I nternship Placements 

Theinternshiprajstbealearningexperienceinvolvirgworkinacrirrinal justice or criminological setting. Interns are 
expected to gai n val uabl e i nf ormati on whi ch wi 1 1 add to thei r overal I understand ng of the f i el d of cri mi nol ogy and 
cri rri nal j usti ce. I nternshi p posi ti ons must center around gai ni ng new materi al over the course of the semester and are 
expected to i nvol ve some degree of ongoi ng trai ni ng/l eami ng for the i ntem. I nternshi p pi acements are subj ect to the 
approval of the I nternshi p Di rector. 

I nternship Eligibility 

I nterns must meet the f ol I owi ng cri teri a: 

• I nterns must be CCJ S maj ors 

• I nterns must have compl eted a mi ni mum of 56 credits at the ti me of appl i cati on 

• I nterns must have a cumul ati ve GPA of at I east 2.5 at the ti me of appl i cati on 

• I nterns must work 40 hours per credit over the course of the semester 

• A maxi mum of 6 i nternshi p credits per semester and a total of 12 i nternshi p credits overal I wi 1 1 be permitted 

• I nternshi p credi t wi 1 1 not be approved for current or previ ousl y heldj obs 

I nterns must regi ster themsel ves for the i nternshi p pri or to the end of the semester's schedul e adj ustment peri od. 
Obtai ni ng Departmental approval for the i nternshi p does N OT regi ster the student for the cl ass. A ddi ti onal 
i nf ormati on about i nternshi ps can be pi eked up from the CCJ S advi si ng of f i ce i n B ui I di ng 1 1 1 , room 5105. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

There are two Student Societies avai I able for membership for CCJ S majors: the Cri rri nal Justice Student Association 
(CRIMSA) andAlphaPhi Sigma Honor Society (APS). 

The Cri rri nal J usti ce Student Association (CRI MSA) is dedicated to supplementing our members' academic experience 
by provi di ng extracurri cul ar opportuni ti es to further expl ore cri ti cal i ssues i nvol vi ng cri mi nol ogy and cri mi nal j usti ce. 
Through a regular program of speakers, agency demonstrations, and community service projects, the CRI M SA 
provi des students with val uabl e i nf ormati on for maki ng deci si ons about career choi ces, further graduate I evel study, 
and law school. CRI MSA provides students with opportuni ties for academic and social interaction, and access to 
cri rri nol ogy and cri rri nal j usti ce researchers, teachers, and practiti oners representi ng a vari ety of government, 
academi c and corrmerci al corporate and non- prof i t organi zati ons. All U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove students, 
regardless of home institution or major, are eligible for CRI MSA membership CRIMSA meeti ngs and programs are 
held at I east monthly during the Fall and Spring semesters. CRIMSA members pay a one-ti me membershi p f ee of $35. 

Alpha Phi Sigma (APS) is a National Criminal J ustice Honor Society founded 1942 and membership is open to CCJ S 
maj ors who have compl eted at I east 40 total credi ts wi th at I east 12 credi ts i n C CJ S courses. U ndergraduate A ppl i cants 
must have an overal I GPA of at I east a 3. 2 and a maj or GPA of atleast3.4. Graduate student applicants must have a 
3. 4 overal I G PA . A ppl i cants must f i 1 1 out an appl i cati on, submi t an off i ci al or unof f i ci al transcri pt and a check 
( personal check i s f i ne) made out to A I pha Phi Si gma for $55. The I ocal chapter's name i s Omega I ota. Compl eted 
appl i cati ons, check, and transcri pts shoul d be submi tted to D r. G erstenbl i th i n B ui I di ng 1 1 1 , room 5105. A ppl i cati ons 
are processed throughout the academi c year. Y ou wi 1 1 be noti f i ed when you have been off i ci al I y accepted. 
A ppl i cati ons are avai I abl e from D r. G erstenbl i th. 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 209 

Awards and Recognition 

E ach year the department sel ects the outstandi ng graduati ng seni or for the Peter J . L ej i ns award. 

Public Health Science, Shady Grove 

301 738-6162 
jtodd@umd.edu 
Dr. Jennifer Todd 

School of Public Health 

U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove 

9630 Gudelsky Drive, Bldg 1 1 1 Room 5127 

www.sph. umd. edu/phs/ 

301-738-6162 

Dr. J ennif er Todd, Program Di rector 

Dr. Coke Farmer, Assistant Dean 

The Major 

The Publ i c H eal th Sci ence degree isasci ence- based program whi ch prepares students to work i n the f i el d of publ i c 
heal th. Students graduate wi th a B achel or of Sci ence degree i n Publ i c H eal th Sci ence whi ch prepares students for 
entry- 1 evel posi ti ons i n a vari ety of publ i c heal th prof essi ons and setti ngs, i ncl udi ng at the I ocal , state, federal , and 
international level in aspects of disease prevention, health promotion, environmental protection, emergency 
preparedness, and wel I ness, as wel I as a host of other publ i c heal th rel ated areas. 

A 1 1 Publ i c H ealth Sci ence maj ors must compl ete some basi c core sci ence and supporti ng cl asses pri or to matri cul ati ng 
at the U ni versi ti es at Shady G rove program Requi rements for the Publ i c H eal th Sci ence maj or at Shady G rove i ncl ude 

I . Completion of University General Education Requirements 

I I . Completion of Program Prerequisites 

H LTH 130 I ntro to Publ i c Corrrnuni ty H eal th 3 

HLTH230 Intro to Health Behavior 3 

BSCI 105 Principles of Biology 4 

CH EM 131/132 General Chemistry with Lab 4 

BSCI 201 H uman A natomy& Physiology I 4 

BSCI 202 H uman A natorry & Physi ology II 4 

BSCI 223 Microbiology 4 

STAT 200 or Statisticsor 3 

MATH 220 Calculus 3 

A NTH 260 I ntro to Soci o A nthropol ogy 3 

III. The Public Health Science Program 
PuUic Health Foundations 

SPHL401 History of Public Health 3 

M I EH 300 I ntro to Envi ronmental Health 3 

HLSA302 I ntro to Health Pol icy and Services 3 

EPIB301 Epidemiol ogy for Public Health Practice 3 

EPIB300 Biostati sties for Public Health Practice 3 



6. The Col I eges and School s Page 210 



Public Health SdenceCore 

□ 

SPHL498X Essentials of Public Health Biology 3 

KNES 360 Physiology of Physical Activity 3 

SPHL 400 Intro to Global Health 3 

SPHL402 Public Health Emergency Preparedness 3 

SPH L 405 Publ i c H ealth I ntemshi p 3 

SPHL409 Social, Political & Ethical Issuesin Public Health 3 

PuUic Health Science Elective* 

SPHL 410 Public Health Program Planning & Evaluation 3 

SPHL 498X Food, Policy, & Public Health 3 

HLTH377 Human Sexuality 3 

H LTH 434 I ntro to Publ i c H ealth I nf ormati cs 3 

HLTH472 Health and Medical Terminology 3 

SPH L 498X I ntro to G I obal H eal th Communi cati on 3 



Adviang^dvising is mandatory for each student. PI ease contact the Program Director, Dr. Todd at (301) 738-6162, orjtc 
jtoddOumd.edu 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 211 



7. Depart m ent^ Majors, and Procjrams 

ACCOUNTING (BMGT) 

The Robert H. Smith School of Business 

1570 Van Munching Hall, 301-405-2286 

www.itisrnith.urrd.eclu/undergrad 

undergradi nfo@rhsmitti.umd.edu 

Chair: M.Loeb 

Professors: L. Gordon, O. Kim M. Loeb, S. Loeb 

Associate Professors: S. Cheng, R. Hann, M. Kimbrough 

Assistant Professors: S. Brown, D.Johnson, H. Lee, C. LevineJ. Staihar 

Lecturers: P. Basu(Tyser Teaching Fellow), G. Bulmash(DistinguishedTyser Teaching Fellow), M. Finch (Tyser Teaching Fellow), A.Jacobs, R. Kovarik.J. Lager, J. McKinney (Tyser 

Teaching Fellow), G. Pfeiffer, A. Ramirez, A. Siegfried (Lecturer) 

Adjunct Professors: E. Cantor, E. Folsom, R. Hall, K. Hardy, M. Laving P. McNamee, P. McPhun, L. Mostow, S. Rose, D. Sites, C. Stevens, N.Webb 

Visiting Faculty: L. Zhou 

TheMajor 

Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, classification, and recording of financial events and the reporting of the results of such events for an organization. I n a broader sense, 
accounting consists of all financial systems for planning, controlling, and appraising performance of an organization. Accounting includes among its many facets: financial planning, 
budgeting, accounting systems, financial management controls, financial analysis of performance, financial reporting, internal and external auditing, and taxation. The accounting curriculum 
provi des an educati onal f oundati on for careers i n publ i c accounti ng and management, whether i n pri vate busi ness organi zati ons, government or nonprof i t agenci es, or consul ti ng. Two tracks 
are provided: The Public Accounting Track leading to theCPA (Certified Public Accounting) and the Management Accounting/Consulting Track. P/easenote Currently, only the Public 
Accounting track is available. 

Admission to the Major 

See Robert H. Smith School of Busi ness entry in chapter 6 for admission requirements. 
Requirements for the Major 



All Accounting Majors: 

B M GT310 I ntermedi ate A ccounti ng I 
B M GT311 I ntermedi ate A ccounti ng 1 1 
B M GT321 M anageri al Accounti ng 
B M GT326 Accounti ng Systems 



Credits 

3 

3 
3 
3 



Accounting Majors must completean additional 12 
credi ts from one of the f ol I owi ng tracks. 

Public Accounting Trade 

B M GT323 Taxati on of I ndi vi dual s* 

BMGT411 EthicsarxJProfessionalisminAccounting* 

BMGT422 Auditi ng Theory & Practice* 

One of the foil owing: 

BMGT410 Government Accounting 

BMGT417 Taxationof Corporations, Partnerships and Estates 

BMGT423 Fraud Examination 

BMGT424 AdvancedAccounting 

BMGT427 AdvancedAuditing Theory & Practice 

BMGT428 Special Topicsin Accounting 



BMGT426 



BMGT305 

BMGT323 
BMGT332 
BMGT385 
BMGT402 
BMGT403 
BMGT410 
BMGT411 
BMGT417 
BMGT423 
BMGT424 
BMGT428 
BMGT430 
BMGT434 
BMGT440 
BMGT446 



Management Accounting/Consulting Trade 

Advanced M anageri al Account] ng 

Three of the following: 

Survey of B usi ness I nf orrnarj on Systems and 

Technology 

Taxation of Individuals* 

Operati ons Research for M anagement Deci si ons 

Operati ons M anagement 

Database Systems 

Systems A nal ysi s and Desi gn 

Government Accounti ng 

Ethi cs and Prof essi onal ism i n Accounti ng* 

Taxation of Corporations, Partnershi ps and Estates 

Fraud Examination 

AdvancedAccounting 

Special TopicsinAccounting 

Li near Statistical Models in Business 

I ntroduction to Optimization 

Advanced Financial Management 

International Finance 



Upper Level Economics Requirement 

One of the foil owing courses: 
ECON305 I ntermedi ate Macroeconomic Theory and Policy 
ECON305 I ntermedi ate Microecononic Theory 
ECON330 Money and Banking 
ECON340 International Economics 



Total Credits for Accounting 
and Economics 



27 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 212 



* Required for CPA in Maryland 

In addition to the major requirements listed above, pi ease consult Chapter 6 or www.rhsmith.umledu for a listing of additional Smith School degree requirements that apply to all Smith 
School majors. 

The basic educational requi rerrents of the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy to sit for theCPA examination are a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major in Accounting or 
with a non-accounti ng clegree supplemented by course work the Board determines to be substantially the equivalert of an Accounting major. Students planning to take the CPA examination 
for certification and licensing outside Maryland should determine the educational requirements for that state and arrange their program accordingly. 

SinceJ une30, 1999, all applicants who clesiretotaketheCPA examination in Maryland have been required to havecompleted 150 semester hours of college work as well as 
other specified requirements. 

Advising 

General advising for students admitted to the Smith School of BusiriessisavailableMondaythroughFriday in the Off ice of Undergraduate Programs, 1570Van Munching Hall, 
301-405-2286, undergradinfo@rhsmith.umd.edu. It is recommended that students visit this office each semester to ensure that they are irforrred about cument requirements and procedures. 
Transfer students entering the university can be advised during spring, summer, and fall transfer orientation programs. Contact theOrientation Office for further information, 301-314-8217. 

Aerospace Engineering(ENAE) 

A. lames Clark School of Engineering 

3181 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 301-405-2376 

www.aero.urrd.edu 

Chair: N. Werdey (Techno-Scienceslnc. Faculty Fellow & Chair) 

Professors: R. Celi, I.Chopra, A. Flatau, W. FoumeyJ. Hubbard, S. Lee J. Leishman, M. Lewis, D. Pines (Dean), N. Werdey 

Associate Professors: D. Akin.J . Baeder, C. CadouJ . Humbert, P. Martin, R. Sanner, R. Sedwick, A. Winkdmann, K. Yu 

Assistant Professors: A.J ones, D. Paley 

Lecturers: B. Barbee, C. Carignan, L. Healy, D. Israel, K. Lewy.J. Mitchell, E. Morel I i, V. Nagaraj, D. Palumbo 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: A. Marshall, A. Trouve 

Professors Emeriti: J. Anderson, E.Jones 

Visiting Faculty: M. Bowden, F. Schnitz 

The Major 

Aerospace engineering concerns processes involved in design, manufacture and operation of aerospace vehicles within and beyond planetary atmospheres. Vehicles range from helicopters 
and other vertical takeoff aircraft at the low-speed end of the flight spectrum to spacecraft travding thousands of miles per hour during launch, orbit, trans-planetary flight or re-entry at 
the high-speed end. Between are general aviation and commercial transport aircraft flying at speeds wd I bdow and close to the speed of sound, and supersonic transports, fighters arid 
missiles. Although each speed regime and each vehicle poses its special problems, all aerospace vehicles can be addressed by a common set of technical specialties or disciplines. 

Sub-disciplines of Aerospace Engineering are aerodynamics, flight dynamics, propulsion, structures, and "design". Aerodynamics addresses the flow of air and associated forces, moments, 
pressures, and temperature changes. F I i ght-dynami cs addresses the moti on of vehi cl es i nci udi ng traj ectori es, rotati onal dynami cs, sensors, and control I aws requi red for successful 
accompl i shment of mi ssi ons. Propul si on addresses the engi nes whi ch have been devi sed to convert cherri cal (and occasi onal I y other f orms) energy i nto useful work to produce the thrust 
needed to propd aerospace vehi cl es. Structures addresses materi al properti es, stresses, strai ns, def I ecrj on, and vi brati on al ong wi th manufacturi ng processes requi red to produce very I i ght 
wdght and rugged dements needed in aerospace vehicles. Aerospace "design" addresses the process of synthesizing vehicles and systems to meet defined missions and more general needs. 
Thi s process draws on i nformati on from other sub-di sci pi i nes whi I e embodyi ng i ts own uni que d errents. The A erospace E ngineering program is designed to provide a firmfoundation in 
vari ous sub- di sci pi i nes. 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the acronym ENAE 

TheBachdorof Science in Aerospace Engineering is accredited by the End neeri ng Accreditation Commi ssi on of ABET, www.abetoro. Ill Market PI ace, Suite 1050, Baltimore MD 
21202-4012, tdephone (410) 347-7700. 

Program Objectives 

( 1) Our graduates wi 1 1 be successful i n thd r prof essi onal careers, i ncl udi ng i ndustry, government servi ce, and acaderri a, i n the State of M aryl and and beyond. 

(2) Our graduates will contribute to the creation of useful new products, or the generation of original research, by analyzing and implementing solutions to rdevant problems in the 
component di sci pi i nes of A erospace E ngi neeri ng. 

(3) Our graduates will contributeeffectivdy when part of an integrated team clearly communi eating with team members, supervisors, and clients. 

(4) Our graduates will understand the societal context in which their profession is practiced, and wi 1 1 successful I y adapt to future developments in both technology and the employment 
market 

Program Learning Outcomes 

As a result of completing our undergraduate program our students should have devd oped the foil owing ski I Is: 

1) A bi I i ty to apply knowl edge of mathemati cs 

2) Abi I ity to apply knowledgeof basic science (chemistry, physics) 

3) A bi I i ty to apply knowl edge of engi neeri ng pri nci pi es 

4) Abi I ity to use computers to sol ve engi neeri ng problems 

5) Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems 

6) A bi I i ty to desi gn and conduct expert merits 

7) Ability to analyze and i nterpret data 

8) Abi I ity to design a component, system or process to meet desi red needs under realistic constraints 

9) A bil ity to use the techniques, skills, and tools of modem engineering practice 

10) Ability to write effectivdy 

11) A bi I i ty to speak eff ecti vd y 

12) Ability to function effectivdy as part of a multidisciplinary team 

13) Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility 

14) K nowl edge of contemporary i ssues i n engi neeri ng 

15) Understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context 

16) Awareness of the need to conti nually upgrade my technical knowledge base and skills 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Aerospace Engineering Department has a number of facilities to support education and research across a range of special areas. The department has subsonic wind tunnds with test 
sections ranging from a few inches up to 7.75 feet by 11.00 feet as wd I asasupersonictunnd with a 6 inch by 6 inch test section. There area number of structural test machi nes with 
capabilities up to 220,000 pounds for static loads and 50,000 pounds for dynamic loads. The department also has experimental facilities to test hdicopter rotors in hover, in forward flight, 
and in vacuum to i sol ate inertial loads from aerodynamic loads. There is an anechoic chamber for the investigation of noise generated by hdi copters, and an autoclave and other facilities 
for manufacturi ng and inspecting composite structures. The neutral buoyancy facility, which investigates the assembly of space structures in a si mulated zero gravity environment is 
supported by robots and associated controllers. There are also many computers and workstations that provide local computing capability and extensive network access to campus 
mai nf rames, supercomputi ng centers, and al I the resources of the I nternet 



Admission to the Major 

Admission requi rerrents are ft 
School section of thissite. 

Requirements for the Major 



Admission requi rerrents are the same as those of other Engi neering Departments. For admission information pi ease see A. James Clark School of Engineering under TheColleges and 
School sectionof thissite 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 213 



Freshman Year 

I ntroducti on to E ngi neeri ng Desi gn f** C an te taken 

first or second semester) 

The Aerospace Engi neeri ng Profession 

General Chemistry for Engineers 
MATH140/141Calculusl,ll 
PHYS161 General Physics I 

M echani cs I (** C an be taken first or second semester) 

A erospace Computi ng 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total Credits 



ENES100 

ENAE100 
CHEM135 



ENES102 
ENAE202 



SophomoreYear 

ENES220 Mechanics 1 1 
ENAE283 Introduction to Aerospace Systems 
MATH241 Calculuslll 

ENAE200 The Aerospace Engi neeri ng Profession 1 1 
ENES232 Thermodynamics 
MATH246 Differential Equations 
MATH461 Li near Algebra for Scientists and Engineers or 
MATH 240 I ntroducti on to Li near Algebra 
PHYS260/261 General Physics II 
PHYS270/271 General Physics II I 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total Credits 



Junior Year 

ENAE311 Aerodynamics I 

ENAE301 Dynamics of A erospace Systems 

ENAE362 Aerospace I instrumentation and Experimentation 

ENAE324 A erospace Structures 

ENAE432 Control of A erospace Systems 

ENAE380 Flight Software Systems 

ENGL393 Technical Writing 

General Education Program Requirements 



ENAE414 



Aeronautical Track 
Aerodynamics 1 1 

Space SystemTrack 



Credits 


Credits 


First 


Second 


San 


San 


3** 




1 




3 




4 


4 




3 




3** 




3 


3 


3 


14 


16 


Credits 


Credits 


First 


Second 


San 


San 


3 




3 




4 






1 




3 




3 




3-4 


4 






4 


3 


3 


17 


16 


Credits 


Credits 


First 


Second 


San 


San 


3 




3 




3 






4 




3 


3 






3 


3 


3 



ENAE404 


Space Flight Dynarri cs 




3 




Total Credits 


15 


16 






Credits 


Credits 






First 


Second 




Senior Year 


San 


San 


ENAE464 


A erospace Engineering Lab 


3 




ENAE423 


Vibration & Aeroelasticity 




3 


ENAE398* 


Honors Research Project, or 




3 


ENAE 400s* 


one 400 level ENAE course 






ELECTIVE+ 


Technical Elective; see note below 




3 




General Education Program Requirements 


3 


3 




Aeronautical Track 






ENAE403 


Aircraft Flight Dynamics 


3 




ENAE455 


Aircraft Propulsion^ Power 


3 




ENAE481 


Principles of Aircraft Design 


3 




ENAE482 


Aeronautical Systems Designs 
Space SystemTrack 




3 


ENAE441 


Space Navigation & Guidance 


3 




ENAE457 


Space Propulsion & Power 


3 




ENAE483 


Principles of Space Systems Design 


3 




ENAE484 


Space Systems Design 




3 




Total Credits 


15 


15 



* Only one of ENAE 398, 488 or 499 may be used for these el ectjves 

+One 300/400 level course in Engineering, Mathematics, or Physical Sciences that 
has been approved for this purpose by the Undergraduate Program Director. 

Minimum Deg^eeRequJrerrcnts The fulfillment of al I Department School, and University requirements. A mini mum of 124 credits are required for an Aerospace Engineering degree. 



Students must select a track. All courses in either the Aeronautical orAstronautjcal track must be completed. Students in ether track who wish to gain a broader education across the 
aeronautical orspaceapplicationareascantakecoursesrequiredintheothertrackaselectives. 

Academic Benchmarks Students pursuing the major should review the academic benchmarks established for this program See www.4vearDlans.urrd.edu . Students will be periodically 
revi ewed to i nsure they are meed ng benchmarks arid progressi ng to the degree Students who f al I behi nd program benchmartcs are subj ect to sped al advi si ng requi rements and other 
interventions. 

Aerospace E lecti ves 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 214 



The Department offers a range of d ecti ves. The fol I owi ng courses have recent! y been off ered as d acti ves for the undergraduate degree 

ENAE398H Honors Research 

ENAE415 Hdicopter Theory 3 

ENAE416 Viscous Flow & Aerodynamic Heating 3 

ENAE424 Design & Manufacture of Computer Prototypes 

ENAE425 Mechanics of Composite Structures 3 

ENAE426 Computer- Aided Structural Analysis and Design 3 

ENAE471 Aircraft Flight Testing 3 

ENAE488B Intro to Computational Structural Dynamics 3 

ENAE488M High Speed Aerodynamics 3 

ENAE488P Product Design 3 

ENAE4S8R Hybrid Rocket Design 3 

ENAE488W Designof Remotely PilotedVehicles 3 

ENAE499 El ecti ve Research (Rqxatable to 6cred tf 3 



Other Requirements for the Major 

See Chapter 6 for mini mum grade requirements in key prerequisite courses for engineering students. Students should fol low the sequence of courses as outlined in the aerospace engineering 
degree requi rerrents and four-year pi an. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Each student is assigned to a faculty member who must be consulted and whose permission is requiredforcourseregistrationeachserrester. The list of advisor 
assi gnments i s avai I abl e i n the department's mai n off i ce and on the department's website 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students can be empl oyed and perform research i n any of the departments research I abs, centers, or f aci I i ti es. Parti ci pad on i n an on or off campus i ntemshi p, co-op, or other expert errtj al 
I earni ng opportunity i s strongl y encouraged. See the aerospace engi neeri ng undergraduate studi es staff for i nf ormati on on perf orrri ng research i n a department I ab and contact the 
Engineering Co-op and Career Services office for assi stance in obtaining off campus positions or experiences. 

Honors Program 

The Aerospace Engineering Honors Program at the University of Maryland provides a rigorous and comprehensive education for a career in technical leadership and scientific or 
engineering research. H onors course work encompasses the requi red curriculum for all University of Maryland Aerospace Engi neeri ng students at an advanced level. 

At the end of their first academic year, each aerospace student is evaluated and students are invited to join the program based on their University of Maryland cumulative grade point 
average and progress toward their degree in Aerospace Engineering. Honors sections of ENAE 283, ENAE 311, andENAE 423 (designated by an 'H' fol lowing the course number) are 
offered as part of this program, in addition to an honors research project, ENAE 398H, which culminates in a scholarly paper and presentation at a professional conference Students who 
compl ete the honors curri cul um graduate with Aerospace H onors at the tj me of commencement 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Department is home to student chapters of the American I nstituteof Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Hdicopter Society - 1 nterrarjonal, and the Sigma Gamma Tau aerospace 
engi neeri ng honors soci ety. Aerospace E ngi neeri ng students are al so frequent parti ci pants i n stAjdentactivitiesof the Society for Aclvancerrent of Materials and Process Engineering. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department offers academic scholarshi ps and recipients are chosen based on merit All admitted and current students i n the department are automatical ly considered for these awards. 
No separate application is requi red. The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation 
with other university offices, parti ci pates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department offers the following awards: Academic Achievement Award for the senior with the highest overall academic average at graduation; R.M. RivdloScholarshipAwardand 
the Stephen Guthrie Memorial Award for highest overall academic average through thejunior year; Sigma Gamma Tau Outstanding Achievement Award for scholarship and service to the 
student chapter and the department; American Hdicopter Society Outstanding Achievement Award for service to the student chapter and the department; American I nstituteof Aeronautics 
and A stronaurj cs Outstandi ng Achi everrent A ward f or schol arshi p and servi ce to the student chapter arri the departrrert; J ohnAnclerson Scholarship in Aerospace Engineering for the best 
paper and poster presentati on based on research performed at the U ni versity of M aryl and. 

African American Studies (AASP) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 Lefrak Hall, 301-405-1158 

www.bsos.umd.edu/aasp/ 

Chair: W. Falk, Acting Chair 

Associate Professors: S. Hariey 

Assistant Professors: M. Chateauvert, G. Dinwiddie, O.Johnson, S. Madhavan.J. Richardson 

Lecturers: J . Clark (Lecturer), J. England, I. Kargbo.J. Semper, D. Terry (Lecturer), B.Ward (Lecturer) 

TheMajor 

The African American Studies Department offers a Bachdor of Arts degree with two highly-regarded options: a Cultural and Social Analysis Concentration with emphasis on cul tore and 
history; or the Public Policy Concentration with an emphasis on problem-solving, analytical decision- making, and practical applications of policy analysis and management ski I Is. In 
addition, students who dect majors in other departments can earn a Certificate in African American Studies. I n September 2004, we introduced a mi nor in Black Women's Studies which is a 
col laborati ve program with the University's Department of Women's Studies. 

Courses offered in this department may be found under the acronym AASP. 
Program Objectives 

The African American Studies Department (AASD) fosters an intellectual environment in which majors learn to critically examine analyze, interpret and discuss the experiences, culture, 
traditions, and dynamics of people of the African Diaspora. A primary goal of the program is to develop strong critical thinking, research and writing skills, through our curriculum such 
thatAASD majors I earn the interdisciplinary rr^thods used in examining the socio-economic, historical, and political experiences and contributions of people of African descent Our 
curriculum is organized and structured to introduce AASD maj ors to African American Studi esand to ensure that they reed ve appropriate grounding in the major themes of thefidd and can 
pi ace these themes in the historical context of the African Diaspora such that they are better prepared to address the social scientific issues of race racism and inequality. The program 
provides preparation in fundamental research methodology so that AASD majors areableto explore research questions with sufficient rigor. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 215 



Rele/ance of goals to the mission statements and/or strategic plans of the university, college, or program as applicable: 

The University of Maryland's stated goals for undergraduates include the ability to learn and develop critical reasoning and research ski I Is; written and oral communications ski I Is; science 
and quantitative reasoning, and technological fluency. AASD majors are well prepared upon graduation in these areas through the departments curri culum and extensive one-on-one 
mentoring by theAASD faculty. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

A primary goal of the program is to develop strong critical thinking, research and writing ski I Is, through our curri culum such that AASD majors I earn the interdisciplinary methods used in 
exani ni ng the sod o-econoni c, hi stori cal , and pol i tj cal experi ences and contri burj ons of peopl e of Af ri can descent Students shoul d acqui re the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

Goal 1: Competency in critical analysis: AASD students can demonstrate critical reading and analytical skills, includi ng understand ng an arguments major assertions and 

assunpti ons and how to eval uate its supporti ng evi dence 

Goal 2: Competency in written communications: AASD majors will demonstrate research ski I Is, integrate their own ideas with thoseof others and apply the conventions of 

attribution and citation correctly. 

Goal 3: Technological competency and critical analysis: AASD majors will demonstrate an understanding of the differences among appropriate and inappropriate methods for 

drawi ng concl usi ons through the use of formal anal yti cal , or computati onal techni ques to address real - wori d prod ems. 

Goal 4: Critical/Analytical Reasoning: AASD majors will be aH e to distinguish between prenises and conclusions, or between data and i nferences from data. 

Goal 5: Competency in oral communications: AASD majors will demonstrate an understanding of the connection between writing and thinking and use writing and reading for 

inquiry, learning, thinki ng and communi eating in an academic setting. They will useeffectivepresentationtechniquesirxiludingrxesentationgraphics. 

Admission to Ihe Major 

Students wishi ng to major in African A meri can Studies must make an advi si ng appointment for an orientation to the major. Students must complete an appli cation and attend a B SOS 
academic plan workshop. 

Please call theAASD office at 301-405- 1158 to make an advising appointment 
Requirements for ihe Major 

Students must earn a grade of C- or better in each course that is to be counted toward cornpletj on of degree requirements. Students must have a mini mum 2.0 cumulative grade point average 
across al I courses used to sati sfy maj or degree requi rements. A 1 1 rd ated or supporti ng courses i n other departments must be approved byanAASPfaculty advi sor. 

Foundation courses required for all majors: 

AASP100 Introduction to African A meri can Studies 

AASP101 Public Policy and the Black Community (ForrrerlyAASP300) 

AASP200 African Civilization 

AASP202 BlackCultureintheUnitedStates 

AASP297 Research Methods in African A meri can Studies (Formerly AASP299R) 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



General Education 



40-46 



Cultural and Social Analysis Concentration Requirements: 

zfnn/Arn Upper-DivisionElectivesinAfricanAmericanStudies 18 

Seminars 

One from 3-6 

AASP397 Senior Thesis 

AASP386/396 Experiential Learning/ Independent Study Non-Thesis Option 
AASP395 Fundamentals of Quantitative Research 4 

One from 3 

AASP400 Directed Readings in African American Studies 
AASP402 Classic Readings in African American Studies 

Public Policy Concentration Requirements 
Analytic Component 

Applied Policy Analysis and the Black Community (Formerly AASP42^) 3 

Computer Appli cations in African A meri can Studies (Formerly AASP423>) 3 

Theoretical, Methodological, and Pol icy Research Issues in African A meri can , 

Studies (ForrrerlyAASP401) 

Principlesof Microeconomics 4 

Principlesof Macroeconomics 4 

Oneadditional analytical ski I Is course outside of AASP, with AASP approval 3 

One from 3 

STAT100 Elementary Statistics and Probability 

SOC Y 201 I ntroductory Stab sti cs for Sod ol ogy 

Equivalent Statistics Course (SophorroreYear) 



AASP 301 
AASP 303 

AASP 305 

ECON 200 
ECON 201 



AASP* Policy ElectivesinAfricanAmericanStudies* 

Final Option 

One from 
AASP397 Senior Thesis 
AASP386/396 Experiential Learning / 1 ndependent Study Non-Thesis 



6 
3-6 



Total Credits 90-93 

* Upper-division AASP el ecti ves in the policy area (AASP numbers 499A-Z) or, with approval, elective courses outside of AASP 



Certificate 

The Certifi cate i n Afri can A meri can Studi es off ers undergraduate students an exed I erf opportunity to devd op a specialization in African American issues while pursuing a maj or in another 
fidd. Certificate students learn about the social, economic, political and cultural history of the Afri can American peoplethrough a concentration of courses they plan with theAASD 
Academic Advisor. Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy core requirements and decti ves. 

E ami ng a Certi f i cate i n Af ri can A meri can Studi es gi ves students a competi ti ve advantage i n the j ob market by adding greater focus to thdr undergraduate experience 

Please see catalog section on "Certificate Programs" for moreinformati on and requi rements for a Certificate in Afri can American Studies. 

Advising 

TheAfricanAmerican Studies Department has mandatory advising for all AASD majors. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 216 



U ndergraduates i n good academi c standi ng may enrol I i n the Af ri can A meri can Studi es Department or obtai n more i nf ormati on about avai I abl e opti ore and servi ces by contact! ng the 
Undergraduate Academic Advisor, African American Studies Department, 2169 Lefrak Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, 301-405-1158. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Afri can A mari can Studies majors and certificate students are welcome to apply for undergraduate research assistant internships as part of theAASP386, Experiential Learning, course The 
student must be in good standing and have at least 56 cumulative credit hours to apply. 

Additionally, AASD majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.0 or above may enroll, with department permission, intheAASP397, Senior Thesis, course working with one or more 
CORE AASD faculty members. The student must have successfully completed AASP297, Research Methods in African American Studies. 

For more information and details, pleasecall theAASD Academic Advisor at 301-405-1158. 

Fiddwork Opportunities 

Experiential Learning in African American Studies is an academic seminar for majors arricertificatestucterts who are working at irternship or service sites rdatBd to African American 
Studies. Through course work and class discussions, students are challenged to integrate their experiential experiences with the interdisciplinary study of past and present African American 
communities. To successful I yearn credit for experiential learning students must fulfil I the requirements at the internship or service site, participate in a bi-weekly seminar, and complete the 
assigned projects aimed at bringing together academic research, reflective work, and professional development. 

The internship or service portion of thecourse requires students to work closely with thei r site supervisors. Students are required to fulfill the job responsibilities and work the number of 
hours per week that is outlined in their I earning proposals. Site supervisors definespecific job responsibilities and assignments, moni tor their training, and evaluate their performance at the 
end of the semester by completing an evaluation form and submitting a letter of recommendation to be included in their portfolios. 

Students are al so requi red to parti ci pate i n a bi - weekl y serri nar and compl ete assi gnments that exani ne the rd ati onshi p between cl assroom work, and servi ce expert ences. The serri nar wi 1 1 
give students the opportunity to discuss their internships .and how their experiences enliance or are enharced by thei ruriderstanding of Afri can A rneri can studies. During the serri nar, 
students will share informati on about assi gnments and give each other feedback. Students will evaluate the r internship sites and the roles the sites play inblack communities andin 
promoti ng social change 

Internships 

AASP386- Experiential Learning in African American Studies was developed to enable majors and certificate students to forrrally link their acaclerric studies to experiences as 
undergraduate teachi ng assi starts and i nterns, and to do so i n a structured I eami ng context. 

The internship requi res students to work closely with the r site supervisors. Students are requi red to fulfil I the job responsibi I ities and work the number of hours per week that is outlined in 
their learning proposals. Site supervisors define specific job responsibi I ities and assi gnments, monitor their training, and evaluate their performance at the end of the semester by 
completing an evaluation form and submitting a letter of recommendation to be included in their portfolios. 

I nterns must participate in a weekly seminar, and compl ete the assigned projects aimed at bringing together academe research, reflective work, and professional development 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

AASD majors have the opportunity of being well prepared for leadership positions in campus organizations. AASD majors have historically held notable positions at the University of 
Maryland in such organizations as the NAACP, Alpha Nu Omega Sorority, I ncorporated andThe Black Student Union. 

TheSociety of Afri can American Studies is the student- run organization associated with and supported by the department TheSociety provides community service in local schools, hosts 
on-campus programs and events, and annual ly has supported a local fami ly through its "Adopt-a-Fami ly" program 

TheSociety sponsors a "Saturday Freedom School" program each year which brings middle school children from a local Prince George's County Public School to campus for seven 
consecutj ve Saturdays. The program provides mentoring and academic support that seeks to foster thedevdopmet of positive Black idertities in the studert participants, while 
strengtheni ng thei r academi c performance 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assi stance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
parti ci pates in the award ngof scholarships to deserving students. For information, pleasevisitwww.financialaid.urrd.edu. 

Awards and Recognition 

Graduating seniors with an overall G.P.A. of a 3.2 who have earned a 3.5 G.P.A. within the major are recognized with departmental honors. 
Graduating seniors with an overall G.P.A. of a 3.5 who have earned a 3.7 G.P.A. within the major are recogni zed with departmental high honors. 



Agricultural Science and Technology (AGST) 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

2102 Plant Sciences Building, 301-405-4355 

www.psl a. umd.edu 

khunt@urrd.edu 

Chair: W. Kenworthy (Professor and Chair) 

Director: D. Glenn (Assoc Prof) 

TheMajor 

Agricultural Sciences and Technology is a science based curriculum that al I ows students to obtain technological skills in a broad area of agricultural studies. Agricultural Sciences and 
Technol ogy students are requi red to take courses i n A gri cul tural Econorri cs, A ni mal Sci ences, E nvi ronmental Sci ence and Technol ogy, PI ant Sci ence and Pest M anagement The hi gh 
number of restricted and non-restricted dectives in this curriculum allows students the flexibility to devdop an academic program compatible with their personal interests. Students 
maj oil ng in this curriculum are strongly advised to choose two primary areas of concentration. For example students may want to devdop expertise in both Animal Sci ence and Crop 
Science 

In addition to offering this curriculum the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture offers two other undergraduate degrees: the Bachdor of Science (B.S.) in Plant 
Sci ences and the Bachdor of Landscape Architecture (BLA). These programs are descri bed dsewhere in the catalog under "Plant Sciences" and "Landscape Architecture" 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronyms: PLSC and LARC. 
Program Learning Outcomes 

• Students will devdop technical and knowledgebasedskillsinthe required areas of study. 

• Students wi 1 1 use techni cal and basi c I earned knowl edge to col I aborate sol ve probl ems and then arti cul ate concl usi ons. 

• Students shall devdop effective corrmuni cation skills and demonstrate the ability to present ideas with clarity to an appropriate audi ence 

• Students wi 1 1 connect and bui I d rd ati onshi ps wi th external groups i n the appropri ate f i d ds of study. 

Requirements for the Major 

Crafts 

ANSC101 Principlesof Animal Science 3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 217 



ANSC 


ANSC** 


3 


ANSC220 


Livestock Management 


3 


ANSC340 


Health Management of Animal Populations, OR 


3-4 


PLSC420 


Principles of Plant Pathology 




AREC250 


Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 


3 


AREC 


AREC** 


3 


BSCI105 


Principles of Biology 1 


4 


BSCI106 


Principles of Biology II, OR 




PLSC201 


PI ant Structure and F uncti on 


4 


BSCI 


BSCI**lnsect PestTypeCourse 


3 


CHEM104 


Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 


4 


CHEM 131/132 


General Chemistry 1 and Lab 


4 


ENST200 


Fundamentals of Soil Science 


4 


ENST 


ENST** 


3 


MATH 113 


MATH113orhigher 


3 


PLSC389 


Intemship 


3 


PLSC398 


Sem'nar 


1 


PLSC101 


1 ntroductory Crop Science 


4 


PLSC453 


Weed Science 


3 


PLSC 


PLSC** 


3 




PLSC, ANSC, or LARC** 


3 




Accounting, Education, Computer, or Policy 


3 



General Education and General Agricultural Program 
Requirements 
ELECT ElectJves 20-21 

**Students may select any coursefs) having required hours in tfie area indicated. 

Advising 

The Department has mandatory faculty advising for each of its major and minor programs. Students are required to meet with their faculty advisor at least twice a year. Seethe Director, 
Dr. D.S. Glenn (301-405- 1331), or the Program M anagement Specialist in Undergraduate Studies in 2102 Plant Sciences Building (301-405-4355) for additional information. 

Internships 

I ntemships with scientists are avail able at nearby federal and state agencies. Numerous internships also exist and can be readily arranged for students interested in private sector 
employment 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The department sponsors student teams that participate in regional and national contests. These teams prepare in the following areas: turf, weeds and crops, and landscape contracting. 

AGST majors are encouraged to join the Agricultural Science Club. This club is open to all UMCP students who have an interest in agriculture and related areas. The AG ScienceClubis 
affiliated with the national student organization of the Agronomy, Crop Science and Soil Science Society of America The function of theclub is to bring together students of like interests 
to parti ci pate i n Col I ege, academi c arid soci al acti vi ti es. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Several scholarships and awards are available to PLSC students. Contact the Associate Dean's office at 301-405-2078 for additional information. The Department also maintains a listing of 

scholarships. ContactKathy Huntin 2102 Plant Sciences, 301-405-4355. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 

parti ci pates in the award ng of scholarships to deserving students For information, viat www.financidaid.umd.edu. 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (AREC) 

Cdlegeof Agriculture and Natural Resources 

2200 Syrmns Hall, 301-405-1291 

www.arec.umd.edu 

undergraduateprograrr@arec.umd.edu 

Chair: L. Olson 

Professors: R. Chambers, R.Just, E. Lichtenberg, R. Lopez, L. Lynch, K. McConnell, W. Musser, M. Neriove 

Associate Professors: A. AlberiniJ. Hanson, H. Leathers, K. Leonard, D. Lipton, R. Williams 

Assistant Professors: V. Hoffmann, P. J akida (Asst Prof), D. Newbum (Asst Prof), C. Towe 

Instructors: D.Johnson (Farm Management Specialist) 

Affiliate Professors: P. Cramton, M. Cropper 

Adjunct Professors: J. ChavasJ. HoddinottJ. List J. Quiggin 

Adjunct Associate Professors: K. McNew 

Professors Emeriti: F. Bender, N. Bockstael, E. Brown, J. Cain, J. Curtis, P. Foster, I. Hardie, D. HuethJ. Moore, G. Stevens, I. Strand, D. Tuthill 

TheMajor 

Agricultural and Resource Economics majors complete a set of prerequisite courses, a core of classes offered by the Agricultural and Resource Economics Department, and one or more 
fields compri sed of sd ected courses from outsi de the department The core i ncl udes courses i n economi c reasoni ng, agri busi ness management, envi ronmental and resource pol i cy, 
agricultural policy, economic devdopment and analytical methods. The program permits students flexibility in choosing fidds to fit their career interests. Majors must complete one and are 
strongl y encouraged to compl ete two f i d ds. The curri cul um bal ances breadth and depth, and I ets students devd op academi c ski 1 1 s i n two or more areas. The program provi des a good 
foundation for careers in economics, resource or envi ronmental policy, agribusiness, and international agriculture Students are al so able torn nor in Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Double Majors 

The department features a double major with Spanish for studentsinterestedincareersinmultinational agri busi ness firms or international agencies. Itfeatures a double major with 
Government and Pol iticsfor students interested in law school. Both can be completed within 120 credits. Other double majors are possible in consultation with an advisor. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

U pon compl eti on of the degree program students shoul d have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

• An understandi ng of economi c terms and concepts. 

• An abi I ity to draw i nferences from data. 

• A knowl edge of rdevant laws, institutions, and policies. 

Requirements for the Major 

Crecfts 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 218 



Prerequisite C ourses 

ECON200 Principles of Microeconomics 
ECON201 Principles of Macroeconomics 
ECON306 I ntermedi ate Microeconorric Theory 
ECON321 Economic Statistics, OR 

B M GT230B usi ness Stati sti cs 
MATH220 Elementay Calculus I, OR 
MATH140 Calculus I 
STAT100 Elementary Statistics and Probabi I ity, OR 

MATH111 Introduction to Probabi I ity 



AREC404 
AREC405 
AREC425 
AREC427 
AREC433 
AREC435 
AREC445 
AREC453 
AREC455 
AREC484 
AREC306 

AREC382 
AREC400S 



Major CoreCourses 

Sevei of these courses rrust be successfully completed. 

Applied PriceAnalysis 3 

Economics of Production 3 

Economics of the Food Sector 3 

Economics of Commodity Marketing Systems 3 

Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

Commodity Futures and Options 3 

Agricultural Development in the Third World 3 

Economics of Natural Resource Use 3 

Economics of Land Use 3 

IntroductiontoEconometricsinAgriculture 3 

Farm M anagement 3 

Corrputer-BasedAnalysisinAgricultural and Resource , 
Economics 

any other 3 credit 400 level AREC course may be substituted with 
permission of advisor 



Fields 

All majors must complete one of thefollowi ng fields. Two are strongly 
encouraged. 



Business Management 

BMGT220 Principles of Accounting I 
BMGT221 Principles of Accounting II 
BMGT340 Business Finance 
BMGT350 Marketing Principles 
BMGT364 Management and Organization 
BMGT380 BusinessLawl 

Other 300 level BMGT courses rray be substituted, with 
B M GT300S P erms ^ on of advisor. (TheAREC tteparinmtcamtsUtiaae 

studmtstotzteBMGTcoursesthatarerestrictEdto business 

rrEjtrs.) 

Total Credits 



18 



Acjiculiiiral Science 

Six (or more) courses in agricultural science, including: 
PLSC204 Fundamentals of Agricultural Mechanics 3 

PLSC100 Introduction to Horticulture, OR 4 

PLSC101 Introduction to Crop Science 

ENST105 Soil and Environmental Quality 3 

ANSC101 Principlesof Animal Science 3 

Other courses in agricultural science chosen in 
AGRI SCI consultation with an advisor. Substitutions to the above 4 

listed courses may be made with the perrrission of advisor. 

Total Credits 18 



Food Production 

Six courses from the foil owing list 
PHYS117 Introduction to Physics, OR 

PHYS121Fundamentals of Physics 
BSCI105 Principlesof Biology 
B SCI 223 General Microbiology 
NFSC100 Elements of Nutrition 
NFSC112 FoodScienceandTechnology 
N F SC430 Food M i crobi ol ogy 
NFSC431 Food Quality Control 

Other courses related to food science can be substituted 

with perrrission of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 219 



Environmental and ResourcePolicy 

Six courses from the foil owing list 

ECON481 Environmental Economics 

ANTH450 Theory and Practiceof Environmental Anthropology 

HIST405 Environmental History 

GEOG372 Remote Sensing 

GEOG373 Geographic Information Systems 

GV PT273 I ntroducti on to E nvi ronmantal Politics 

GVPT306 Globd Ecopolitics 

Other courses related to environmental policies or sciences 
can be substituted with permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



ECON305 
ECON315 
ECON340 
GEOG422 
GVPT200 
GVPT350 
ENST440 
PLSC303 



I ntemational Acfiodture 

Six courses from the foil owing list 

Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas 3 

International Economics 3 

Population Geography 3 

International Political Relations 3 

International Relations in theThird World 3 

Crops, SoilsandCivilization 3 

I ntemati onal C rap Product: on 3 

Other courses related to international economics, business, 
politics, or agriculture can be substituted with permission of 
advisor. 

Total Credits 18 



GVPT 



Political Process 

Any six courses in government and politics, chosen with 
permission of the advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 
18 



Advanced Decyee Preparation 

Six (or more) courses from the following list 

ECON407 Advanced Macroeconomics 

ECON414 GameTheory 

ECON415 Strategic Behavior and Incentives 

ECON422 Econometrics I 

ECON423 Econometrics 1 1 

ECON425 Mathematical Economics 

MATH141 Calculus II 

MATH240 I ntroducti on to Li near Algebra 

MATH241 Calculus II I 

Other courses in mathematics, statistics, or econometrics 
may be substituted with permission of advisor. 

Total Credits 



18 



Student Deacped Field 

Thisfidd requires a written proposal listing at least six 
courses total ingat I east 18 credits. The proposal must be 
submitted to theUndergraduateCommtteeof theAREC 
department. Comni ttee approval must be obtai ned 30 or 
more credi t hours before graduati on. A student desi gned 
f i el d may be used to study a f orei gn I anguage as part of the 
AREC curriculum 

Total Credits 



18 



18 



Other Requirements for the Major 

All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better to court towards prerequisite courses, major core courses, or field requirements. "C- or better" means any grade for which the 
University awards 1.7 or more quality points in calculatingGPA. Beginning with students matriculating Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must havea mini mum C 
(2.00) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy major degree requirements. 

Requirements for theMinor 

Four minors exist in AREC, Agribusiness Economics, Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Development Environmental Economics and Policy, and Global Poverty. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 220 



Requi rements are I i steel bel ow: 

Agri business Economics 

AREC250 Elements of Agricultural and Resource Econorrics (3 credits) 
AREC404 Applied PriceAnalysis (3 credits) 
AREC405 Economics of Production (3 credits) 
AREC425 Economics of Food Sector (3 credits) 
AREC435 Commodity Futures and Options (3 credits) 

Another AREC course can be substituted for one of the courses listed \m th 

perrhssion of the Undergraduate Advisor. 

15Total Credits 



AREC250 
AREC365 
AREC433 

AREC445 

AREC453 



Resource and Agricultural Policy in Economic Development 

Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics (3 credits) 

World Hunger, Population and Food Supplies (3 credits) 

Food and Agricultural Policy (3credits) 

Agricultural Development Population Growth, and Environment (3 

credits) 

Natural Resourcesand Public Policy (3 credits) 

Another AREC course can be substituted for one of the course listed with 
perrrission of the Undergraduate Advisor. 

15Total Credits 



AREC240 
AREC332 

AREC382 

AREC445 
AREC455 



Environmental Economics and Policy 

Introduction to Econorrics and Die Environment (3credits) 

Introduction to Natural Resource Pol icy (3 credits) 

Computer-based AnalysisinAgricultural and Resource Econorrics (3 

credits) 

Agricultural Development Population Growth, and Environment (3 

credits) 

Economics of Land Use (3 credits) 

Another AREC course can be substituted for one of the course listed with 

perrrission of Undergraduate Advisor. 

15Total Credits 



Global Poverty 

Students rrust complete at least 15 credits in the Minor including at least one of the following Signature courses in the Global Poverty Minor: 

AREC 345 
AREC 365 



Global Poverty and Economic Development (3 credits) 
World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies (3 credits) 



and at least one signature course from another track in the Global Studies Minor Program 

BSST 330 Terrorist Motivations and Behaviors (3 credits) 

ENES472 International BusinessCulturesinEngineeringandTechnology (3credits) 

GEOG 130 Developing Countries (3 credits) 

GEOG 330 As the World Turns: Society and Sustainabi I ity inaTimeof GreatChange (3credits) 

GVPT305 Global Ecopolitics (3 credits) 

The remaining credi ts rrust be corrpleted from the following: 



Agricultural Development Population Growth and the Environment (3 credits) 

Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas (3credits) 

Economicsof Poverty and Discrimination (3 credits) 

Theory of Economic Development (3 credits) 

Economic Development of Selected Areas(3 credits) 

International CropProduction-lssuesandChallengesinthe21stCentury (3credits) 

Poverty, Affluence, and Families (3 credits) 

Developing Countries (3 credits) 

Evaluating Global Development Assistance (3 credits) 

Parenting and Poverty: The Effects of Growing Up Poor on Children's Development (3 credits) 



AREC 445 
ECON 315 
ECON 375 
ECON 416 
ECON 418 
ENST 100 
FMSC381 
GEOG 130 
HONR 228N 
HONR 228R 

3 credi ts of study abroad or 3 credi ts of an i ntemshi p or expert enti al I earni ng re! ated to poverty and approved by advi sor. 

A second Global Poverty signature course and additional signature courses from another Global Studi es M i nor may serve as el ectives provided they are not being used to satisfy the 
requirements of a different minor. Students may also proposeother courses to meet the elective requi rerrent N o course may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one rri nor. 

At I east 9 credi ts must be at the 300-400 1 eve! . 

All courses presented for the rri nor must be passed with a grade of C- or better. Beginning with students matriculating in Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must 
have a rri ni mum C (2.00) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy rri nor requi rements. 



Advising 

Because the program isflexible, advi sing is mandatory every semester. Appointments may be made by visiting the I ink below. 

http://www.arec. umd.edu/A caderri cs/U ndergraduate/A dvi si ng.cf m 

Internships 

I nternship Program 

This internship experience is open to current AREC undergraduate students and students in theGlobal Poverty minor. 

I nternship Program Description 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 221 



Students will identify an internship and start the process of getting approval from the Assistant Director. If students need help with identifying an internship, the Assistant Director can 
provide assistance Once approval is given and all paperwork is signed, the student will register for the internship course, AREC 386. A students nxistcorr^etetheirtemship in thesarre 
semester he/she register for the course 

Please visit this link for additional information. 

http://www.arec.unxl.edu/Acaclemcs/Unclergraduate/lrterrishipPrcqranYiridex.cfm 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

AREC offers scholarships to AREC undergrads. These awards are based on merit and are in addition to any funding received from the campus or from the col lege Currently, scholarship 
awarcfeareavalabletothefull-rjrreAREC majors with the highest GPAs. They are deterrrined on a semester basisarxi depend on the avai lab I ity of funds. Scholarshipawardeesare 
required to conduct themselves in accordance with the rules and regulations of the University. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
partj cipates in the award ng of scholarships to deserving students For informati on, vi3t www.financidaid.urrcl.edu . 

Awards and Recognition 

Schol arshi ps honori ng A rthur and Paul i ne Sei denspi nner and Ray M urray are avai I abl e Contact a f acul ty advi sor for more i nf ormarj on, 301-405- 1291. 

American Studies (AM ST ) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1102 Holzapfe! Hall, 301-405-1354 

amstumd.edu 

ameri canstudi es@urrd.edu 

Chair: N. Struna 

Professors: J . Caughey, R. Kelly 

Associate Professors: J. Paoletrj, S. Parks, M. Sies, P. Williams-Forson 

Assistant Professors: J . Farman, P. Guerrero, C. Hanhardt, J . M cCune 

Lecturers: M. Brady, R. Chester, L. Gordon, C. LaRocheJ . Maffie, S. Pramschufer 

Affi Nate Professors: J . Auerbach, I. Berlin (DistUniv Prof), A. Bolles, S. Brower, C. Caramello, E. Chambers, W. Cohen, B. Dill (Dean), J . Donawerth, W. Falk, B. Finkelstein.J . Greene, 

R. Harrison, M. Howland.J. Klumpp, M. Leone R. Levine, S. Michel, B. Pearson, C. Peterson, S. Ray, B. Richardson, G. Ritzer (DistUniv Prof), D. Rosenfelt P. Shackel, B. Shneiderman, 

S. Simpson, M . Smith, O. Wang, M . Washington, D. Wyatt, R. Zarrbrana, M . Zilfi 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: R. Ater, S. Bafkin, R. Bauer, M. Bell, E. Barkley Brown, C. EadesJ . Freidenberg, D. Freund, M. Geores, S. Giovacchini, I. Goumay, M. Graber, S. Harley, 

S. Kim K. King, M. Kirschenbaum, M. Lindemann, D. Linebaugh, L. Mar, A. Moss, R. Muncy, Z. Nunes, A. Rodriguez, L. Rowland, D. SiciliaJ. Sullivan, O. Wang 

Affi Nate Assistant Professors: F. Carpenter, M. Chateauvert, V. MacDonald, R. OntiverosJ. Richardson, T. Rodgers, M. Rowley, P. Warfield 

Adjunct Professors: B. Finn 

Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Hughes 

Professors Emeriti: L. Mintz (Assoc Prof Emeritus) 

The Major 

Ameri can Studies provides students with a flexible coherent program of study that focuses on the cultures of everyday life and the cultural construction of identity and difference in 
Americans' lives, past and present TheB. A. degree prepares students for graduate work or careers in fields such as law, government and social policy, media, non-profit and social justice 
organizations, cultural institutions, education, and business. There are opportunities for internships, research, and departmental honors. Faculty advisors assist each student to plan an 
indivi dualized course of study tailored to hi sor her interests and goals. Courses offered by the Department of American Studies may be found under the acronym AMST. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Students are expected to engage f ul I y wi th the curri cul urn, f acul ty, the r f el I ow students, and the opportuni tes avai I abl e for I eami ng and research. U pon compl etj on of the degree program, 
students will havedenxinstrated an understanding of multiple dimensions of diversity, possess the ability to answer research questions by using appropriate American Studies 
methodol ogi es, and have acqui red the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 

• Understanding and applying interdisciplinary theories and methods. 

• Understanding Ameri can Studies as a field, including current and emerging issues. 

• Understanding of cultural literacy, including visual, textual and cybercultural literacies. 

• Understanding the political and historical dimensions of culture 

• Understanding the importance of cultural diversity in American society. 

• An ability to connect classroom and extracurricular learning in fostering active engaged citizenship. 

Requirements for the Major 

The major in American Studies requires a mini mum of 42 credits distributed as follows: 

• AMST 101 (required of all majors) -3 credits 

. OneAMST lower level course, eg. AMST 202, 203, 204, 205, 207, 212, 260, 298- 3credits 

• Two Americanist Foundation courses from a list of approved choices. Americanist Foundation courses are lower level courses in departments such as AASP, ARTH, ENGL, HIST, 

SOCY, and WM ST. (The currentlist of courses approved for the requirement is posted on the department's web site: www.amsturrd.edu) - 6 Credits 

Some or all of the 200-1 eve! courses may also fulfill General Education Requirerrents. 

• Four upper level AMST courses - 12 credits 

• AMST 340- History, Theory and Methods in American Studies (required) - 3 credits 

• AMST 450 - Seminar in American Studies (required) - 3 credits 

AMST 340 and AMST 450 constitute a sequence emphasizing independent research based on original sources and culrrinating in a senior thesis AMST 340 is a prerequisitE for AMST 450 
and trust be corrpleted before enroll went in the senior serrinar. The sequence is usually taken in the students senior year. 

• A FOCUS Area Consisting Of four Upper level Courses inarwther department Or University approved ni nor. (Alistof suggested Focus Areas can be found on the departments website: www.arrsturrd.edu.) - 12 

credits 

At least fwef ve of the upper level credits trust be at the 400 level. A grade ofC- or better is required in every course subnrittsd in fulfillment of major requirerrents An overall GPA of 2. in 
the major is required for graduation. 

Total credits 42 

Requirements for the Minor 

M inor in U.S. Latina/o Studies 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1208 Cole 301-405-2931 

www.umd.edu/wmst 

The ni nor, which requires a total of 15 credits, is intended for students who wish to develop a specialization in U.S. Latjna/o Studies alongside their degree pursuits. It is optimal for 

students engaged i n work with U ,S. Latina/o communities in a variety of professions and academic fields including hi story, literature education, urban studies and planning, healthcare 

social services, business, government public policy, among others. 

Requirements (15 crafts) 

A. Two Lower-Level Foundation Courses (6 credits) -All students are required to take the two foundational courses: 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 222 



USLT 201AJ.S. Latina/o Studies I : An Historical Overview to 1960s 

USLT 202/US. Latina/o Studies 1 1 : A Contemporary Overview, 1960s-Present. 

B.OneUpper-Level Course (3 credits) 

All students are required to take the upper-level course: USLT 488/Senior Seni narinU.S. 

Latina/o Studies 

C. Two Upper Level Elective Courses (6 credits) 

In addition to the three required foundational courses, students wi 1 1 select two elective courses in consultation with the USLT advisor: 

Onefromeachof two of the foil owing categories: Humanities, Social Sciences, Languages, and Education. 

For these el ectives, students can choose USLT 498/Special Topics in U.S. Latina/o Studies and from a list of pre-approved courses offered through other departments or programs. Elective 
courses will explore the historical, cultural, political, economic, and sociological dimensions of U.S. Latina/o experiences. These courses will be approved by the faculty advisory 
committee. Additional courses that include comparative U.S. Latino content, such as inLASC or GVPT, would be el igiblefor inclusion in the mi nor with the approval of the USLT advisor. 

N o course grade below the grade of C- may count toward the mi nor. An overall GPA of 2.0 in the minor is required for graduation. 
To make an appointment to explore or declare a mi nor, gotowww.amu.umd.edu/uridergraduate/academics/rninors 

Advising 

Advising inAmerican Studies is mandatory every semester for all majors. Students pursuing the maj or should review the academic benchmarte established for this program See 
www.4yearpl ans. urrd.edu. Students wi 1 1 be peri odi cal I y revi ewed to i nsure they are meeti ng benchmarte and progressi ng to the degree Students who fal I behi nd program benchmarks are 
subj ect to sped al advi si ng requi rements and other i nterventi ons. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Majois in American Studies complete a research project for the senior seminar, AM ST 450. They areencouraged to gain additional research experience by working with individual faculty 
members and advanced graduate students or parti ci pati ng i n one of the Departments Worki ng G roups. See the Department Web si te for more i nf ormati on about research: 
www.amstumd.edu. 

Internships 

J uniors and seniors with a 2.5 GPA or better may apply 3 credits of internship (AM ST 386) to the 42 credits requi red for the major. Students must consult with a faculty advisor about a 
prospecti ve internship prior to regi strati on and complete and sign an internship contract. All internships must have an approved academic component For further information, contact 
Associate ProfessorJ o Paoletti (jpaol@unxl.edu). 

Honors Program 

The departmental honors program offers outstandi ng students an opportunity to add di sti ncti on to thei r academi c records by undertaki ng an i ndependent research proj ect i n an area of 
parti cul ar i nterest to them 

The program is intended to allow students preparing for graduate study or a professional career to apply and further develop their research, analytic, and writing skills in an independent 
proj ect of their own design, in consultation with afaculty mentor. Students are encouraged to make use of the rich resources of the Washington-Baltimore area, including maj or research 
institutions such as the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, and the National Archives. 

Students in the honors program requi rements take two honors-designated courses and two semesters of AM ST388HonorsThesis, a total of twelve credits. Students enrol led in honors are 
excused from A M ST450 Seni or Semi nar.These requi rements f i t within the 42 credits required to corrplete the rrajor. Participation in honors does not require additional coursework 
beyond the required 42 credits. 

Eligibility: Students must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA at the time of entry into the program and must maintain a mini mum 3.0 GPA overall to remain in good standing. To graduate 

with honors in American Studies, students must havea 3.0 cumulativeGPA and a GPA of 3.2 or higher in their major coursework. 

Application: Students who wish to pursue Honors work should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies at (301) 405.1354 to discuss the program and appl ication procedures. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The department awards the David Ellis Memorial Scholarship annually. For information and requirements, contact the American Studies office (301-405-1354). 

Awards and Recognition 

The department recogni zes outstandi ng accompl i shments by undergraduates at i ts commencement ceremony. M onetary pri zes are awarded to the graduate wi th the hi ghest cumul ati ve GPA , 
to the author of the best Honors thesis, and to a graduate who has provided exceptional service to the campus or the community. 

ANIMAL SCIENCES(ANSC) 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

1415A Animal Sciences Center, 301-405-1373 

www.ansc.urrcl.edu 

ansc@umd.edu 

Chair: T. Porter 

Professors: R. Erdman, R. Kohn, I. Mather, M. Ottinger, R. Peters, T. Porter, M. Vamer, I. Vijay 

Associate Professors: C. Angel, J. Doerr, I. Estevez, T. Hartsock, C. Keefer, W. Stricklin, L. Woods, N. Zimmermann 

Assistant Professors: B. Bequette, A. Burk, I. Hamza, F. SiewerdLJ. Song, L.Taneyhill, M. Updike 

Lecturers: C. Hakenkamp 

Affiliate Professors: S. Schoenian 

Professors Emeriti: L. Douglass (Prof Emeritus), J. Heath, J. MajeskieJ. SoaresJ. Vandersall, D. Westhoff, W.Williams 

The Major 

The Department of Animal and Avian Sciences provides a challenging program for academically talented students interested in the appl ication of biology and technology to the care 
management and study of domestic and aquatic animals. In addition to emphasizing the traditional farm species of dairy and beef cattie sheep, swine and poultry, our program includes 
opti ons i n equi ne studi es, I aboratory ani mal management and sci ences whi ch prepare students for veteri nary or graduate school . A ni mal sci ences maj ors expl ore a wi de range of subj ects - 
from fundamental bi ol ogy to ani mal nutri ti on, physi ol ogy and geneti cs ~ whi I e i ntegrati ng sci ence and economi cs i nto ani mal management 

Our department offers B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Onethirdof our animal sci ences seni ors enter veteri nary school, while others go on to graduate school. Our graduates also pursue a 
vari ety of careers such as research techni ci ans, sal es or marketi ng represented ves, or ani mal producers. 

Academic Programs and Depart m en ta l Facilities 

Ourup-to-datefacilitiesintheAnimal Sci ences Center, which opened in 1991, include new classrooms, an inviting lecture hall and a large social area for students. The newly constructed 
teachinglabs, animal rooms andasurgery suite arelocated adjacent to the teaching farm where horses, sheep, beef and dairy cattie are maintained. 

Reqii rements for the Major 

Animal Sci ences prepares students for veteri nary school, graduate school and careers in research, sales and marketing, biotechnology, aquaculture and animal production. The curricula 
apply the principles of biology and technology to the care, management and study of dairy and beef cattle, horses, fish, sheep, swine, and poultry. Students complete the Ani mal Sciences 
core courses and choose a specialization area: Animal Biotechnology, Animal Care and Management Equine Studies, Laboratory Ani mal Management and Sciences/Professional Option 
to prepare f or adrri ssi on to graduate, veteri nary, pharmacy, nursi ng or medi cal school Please note there i s a $50 per course fee for A ni mal Sci ence L aboratory courses. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 223 



ANSC101 

ANSC103 

ANSC211 

ANSC212 

ANSC214 

ANSC314 

ANSC327 

BSCI105 

BSCI223 

CHEM 131/132 



MATH220 
MATH 140 



ANIMAL SCIENCESCORE 

All undergraduates majoring in Animal Sciences must 

complete the following course requirements 

Principles of Animal Sciences 

Principles of Animal Sciences Laboratory 

Animal Anatomy 

Animal Physiology 

Animal Physiology Laboratory 

Comparative Animal Nutrition 

Molecular and QuantitativeAnimal Genetics 

Principles of Biology I 

General Microbiology 

General Chemistry I/Laboratory 

One from 

Elementary Calculus I 
Calculus I 



One from 
AREC250 Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 

ECON200 Principlesof Micro-Economics 

ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK 

All students must complete 30-40 credits in one of the 
following six options. 



L ANIMAL CARE AND MANAGEMENT (01O4A) 
RequiredCaurses 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimal Nutrition 3 

ANSC446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology II 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 6 credits from the foil owing courses 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC450 Animal Breeding Plans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 AppliedAnimal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombi nant DN A Laboratory 3 

Plus take 9 credits from the foil owing courses 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

ANSC240 DairyCatrJeManagement 2 

ANSC255 IntroducrjontoAquaculture 3 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 3 

ANSC305 Companion Animal Care 3 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 3 

2 EQUINE STUDIES (OMMC) Required Causes 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

ANSC330 Equine Science 3 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimal Nutrition 3 

ANSC446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

AREC306 Farm Management 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology 1 1 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 9 credits from the foil owing courses 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC450 Animal Breeding Plans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 AppliedAnimal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombi nant DN A Laboratory 3 



3. LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT (O104D) 
RequiredCaurses 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 224 



ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

ANSC413 LabAnimal Management 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 AppliedAnimal Behavior 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology II 4 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

Plus take 6 credits from the foil owing courses 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC450 Animal Breeding Plans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombi nant DIM A Laboratory 3 

Plus take 3 credits from the following courses 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC255 IntroductJontoAquaculture 3 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultry Management 3 



4 & 5. SCIENCES & COMBINED AC AND VET SCI 

(01O1E arxll299D) Required Courses 

ANSC315 AppliedAnimal Nutrition 3 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology II 4 

BCHM463 Biochemistry of Physiology or 3 

BSCI230 Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

CHEM231/232 Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

CHEM241/242 Organic Chemistry 1 1 /Laboratory 4 

CHEM271 General Chemistry and Energetics 2 

PHYS121 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PHYS122 Fundamentals of Physicsll 4 

Plus take 9 credits from the foil owing courses 

ANSC340 Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

ANSC420 Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

ANSC435 Experimental Embryology 3 

ANSC437 Animal Biotechnology 2 

ANSC443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

ANSC444 Domestic Animal Endocrinology 3 

ANSC446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 
ANSC450 Animal Breeding Plans 

ANSC452 Avian Physiology 3 

ANSC453 Animal Welfare 3 

ANSC455 AppliedAnimal Behavior 3 

ANSC497 Animal Biotechnology Recombi nant DN A Laboratory 3 

Plus take 3 credits from the foil owing courses 

ANSC220 Livestock Management 3 

ANSC232 Horse Management 3 

ANSC240 DairyCattJeManagement 2 

ANSC255 IntroductJontoAquaculture 3 

ANSC262 Commercial Poultiy Management 3 

ANSC413 Laboratory Animal Management 3 

For additional information concerning \/eteri nary school 
applicatjors, pi ease contact the K. Fddrran, VMRCVM, 8705 
Greenrread Dr., Uni\/ersity of Maryland, College Park MD 
20742-3711, 301-314-6820, kfddrran@urrd.edu. 



ANSC437 

ANSC497 

BCHM463 

BSCI230 

CHEM23V232 

CHEM24V242 

CHEM271 



ANSC220 
ANSC255 
ANSC262 
ANSC413 



ANSC340 
ANSC420 
ANSC443 
ANSC445 
ANSC447 



6 ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY (01O4F) Required 
Courses 

Animal Biotechnology 2 

Animal Biotechnology Recombi nant DN A Laboratory 3 

Biochemistry of Physiology 3 

Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory 4 

Organic Chemistry I I/Laboratory 4 

General Chemistry and Energetics 2 

Plus take 3 credits from the foil owing courses 

L i vestock M anagement 3 

IntroductJontoAquaculture 3 

Commercial Poultiy Management 3 

Laboratory Animal Management 3 

Plus take 9 credits from the foil owing courses 

Health Management of Animal Populations 3 

Critical Thinking in Animal Sciences 3 

Physiology and Biochemistry of Lactation 3 

Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 3 

Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction Laboratory 1 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 225 



ANSC450 


Animal Breeding Plans 


ANSC452 


Avian Physiology 


ANSC453 


Animal Welfare 


ANSC455 


Applied Animal Behavior 




Plus take 3 credits from the following courses 


ANSC435 


Experimental Embryology 


BSCI380 


Corrparatj ve B i oi nformati cs 


BSCI413 


Recombinant DNA 



Other Requirements for the Major 

Animal sciences majors select one of six options as an area of specialization: 

Science/Professional - Prepares students for admission to veterinary or medical school sand/or graduate school. Graduate school study can open the door to an exciting research career in 
specialty areas of animal or biological sciences such as genetics, nutrition, physiology or cell biology. Thecurriculum emphasizes advanced coursesinthe biological and physical sciences 
and i ncl udes al I the pre-veteri nary and pre-rredi ci ne requi rerrents. 

Combined Ag& Vet Sd - A combi ned degree program isavai I ableto students who gainadmissi on to veterinary school prior to completing their bachelor's degree. College of Agriculture 
and N atural Resources students who have compl eted at I east ni nety hours, i ncl udi ng al I col I ege and uni versi ty requi rements, are awarded a bachel or of sci ence degree upon successful 
completion of at least thirty semester hours in an accredited col lege of veterinary medicine Early planning with your advisor is encouraged if you choose this option. 

EquineShJcfes -Offers hands-on learning opportunities in the area of equine science arrirrwiagerret. The Department of Animal and Avian Sciences at the University of Maryland offers 
undergraduate students the opportuni ty to emphasi ze on horses whi I e pursui ng a B achd or of Sci ence degree i n A ni mal Sci ence Students may take equi ne courses that expl ore a wi de range 
of topics including anatomy and physiology, nutrition, reproduction, exercise, law, insurance, facilities, health and disease pasture management, and mare Our courses are designed to 
provide valuable hands-on I earning experiences to better prepare students to be future leaders in the horse industry as well as other industries. In addition, A NSC students may take one or 
more equi recourses within the I nsrjtute of A ppl ied Agriculture 

Animal Biotechnology- The Animal Biotechnology option is a relatively new addition to our program It combines the basic requi red animal science courses withafocus on biology and 
technology. This option has a heavy emphasi son sci ence courses, to prepare students for a professional career. Some of the career options with this track include: an industry career in 
animal biotechnology; a graduate degree in biotechnology (either MS and/or PHD); or a professional degree and career (Veterinary or Human Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy.) 

Animal Care& Management- Is designed for students whose career plans include animal management, production and the marketing of animal products.The curriculum provides basic 
courses in genetics, nutrition, physiologyarrireprciductionwhileallowirigsrjuotentstofocLBonthemariagerrEntof one particular livestock species. You will be encouraged to supplement 
academic work with practical expert ence by completing an internship. Dairy science students, for example, intern at local farms where they participate in decisions about breeding, feeding, 
health practices, mi I k production and other aspects of herd management This option will prepare you for ownership or management positions with dai ry, I i vestock or poultry production 
enterpri ses; posi ti ons wi th marked ng and processi ng organi zati ons; breed associ ati ons; and posi ti ons i n agri busi ness f i el ds such as sal es of feed, pharmaceufj cal products and agri cul rural 
equipment. Graduates also work with state and federal agencies. 

Laboratory Animal Management- Prepares stixierfe for careers in the operation and management of laboratory ani mal facilities connected with the biotechnology industry. Course work 
innutrition, reproduction and environmental management is combi ned with practical leamingtoprovide future mariagers with toolsthey will need. As a graduate you may pursue careers 
with state or federal agencies; with private industry in the management and operation of laboratory animal production; and with instructional or investigational facilities. 

Advising 

Animal sciences majors are assigned a faculty advisor to assist with program and course selection, as well as to help students take advantage of the many non-classroom opportunities in the 
Washington, D.C. area Faculty members have specialties in all areas of animal sciences, as well as veterinary medicine, and bring practical applications to the classroom creating a rich 
I earni ng experi ence for students. 

Facetofaceadvisingismandatory. Each student will be assigned to a faculty advisor to assist in planning his or her academic program Forinformation or appointment: 1415A Animal 
Sci ences Center, 301-405- 1373. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Because it is part of a land grant university, the Department of Animal and Avian Sciences also has responsibility for research and technology transfer to the animal industry throughout 
Maryland. Duri ng undergraduate study, students are encouraged to conduct independent research in faculty laboratories on campus or at the nearby U . S. Department of Agriculture 
BeltsvilleAgricultural Research Center. 

Internships 

Students are encouraged to gai n practi cal ani mal management experi ence by pursui ng i ntemshi ps. Students have compl eted i nternshi ps i n I ocati ons rangi ng from the area around the 
University, to cattie farms in the Midwest, agribusiness firms in California, and a zoo in Frankfurt, Germany. Many ani mal sciences students use the summer to gain additional applied 
experi ence in ani mal sciences, veterinary medi cine or agri busi ness. 

Honors Program 

Students admitted to the AGNR Honors Program are digibleto take 3- 6 credits of HonorsThesis Research within the ANSC Department (A NSC388). Undergraduate honors thesis research 
is conducted under the direction of an AGNR faculty member in partial fulfillment of the requirements of theCollegeof AGNR Honors Program The thesis will be defended before a 
faculty committee 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The clubs and organizations affiliated with theAni mal Science department allow ampleopportunitiesforleadership, development, hands-on animal experience, and fun! 

Alpha Gamma Rho 

Alpha Gamma Rho is a social/professional fraternity that has been a training ground for leaders in the agriculture and life sciercescorrrrunity si nee it was established atCollege Park in 

1928. AGR has a rich tradition of alumni contacts with over 50,000 brothers nationwide, i ncl udi ng over 700 brothers in the Washington area al one AGR man are leaders in various clubs 

within the col lege and the fraternity is an active member of both the I nter-fratemity Council (IFC) and the Ag Student Council. Alpha Gamma Rho stresses scholarship, leadership and 

fellowship, and it is well respected among Greek organizations because of their no pledging, substance free, scholars environment In addition, the chapter house on Princeton Avenueoffers 

the opportuni ty to I i ve wi th brothers who are taki ng the same cl asses and share many of tine same i ntereste which makes itrru:h easier to firri a niche on such a large campus. 

Alpha Zeta 

A I pha Zeta i s an agri cul tural prof essi oral honor sod ety whose membershi p i s sel ected from undergraduate and graduate students exed I i ng i n schol arshi p, I eadershi p, character, and servi ce 
Organizational events include coordinating the Partners in Education program with the USDA Agriculture Research Service, BdtsvilleArea, fund raising activities, community service 
projects, awards and recognition programs, and an annual student/f acuity/alumni banquet A popular annual event is coordinating a Fidd Day for young children at the nearby National 
Agricultural ResearchVisitorCenter atBdtsville 
Animal HusbandryClub 

TheAnimal Husbandry Club attheUniversity of Maryland, College Park, provides opportuni ties for students to gain ani mal handling experienceand build interpersonal rdationshipskills, 
whilegiventheencouragementtoexcd! Acti vities and experiences specif i cal I y designed for students of diversified interests in ani mal agri culture are provided, including experiences with 
many different domestic species. Membershi pis open toal I undergraduate students interested ingetti ng hands-on experi ence working with dairy, beef, sheep or swi ne, and learning more 
about general animal sciences. Activities include the Ag Day Dairy and Livestock Shows, Harvest Stomp/Fall Festival, fitting of ani malsfor the annual Wye Angus Sale and other activities 
working with dairy animals. Onecan gain further leadership skills by hoi ding an office Each Spring, dections are hdd for President Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Historian. 

Cdlecjate4-H 

Many col leges and uni versi ties have Collegiate 4- H clubs. Collegiate 4-H is an organization that provicles its rrmtes with a sense of identity on campus, enriches thdr lives through group 
projects and recreation, and devd ops confidence and leadership ski I Is. Clubs provide service and support to theirlocal andstate4-H programs, such as serving as judges and conducting 
training workshops. They are alsoaservice and social group for campus students. Collegiate4-H isopentoall college students who wishtosupport youth and the4-H program It is not 
necessary to have prior 4-H experience, only to have an interest in the 4-H idealsarriinservinqvourcommuni twww.colleqiate4h.org/ 

Sigma Alpha 

SigmaAlpha is a national professional agricultural sorority. Theobjectiveof thesorority istoprormteitsmembersinall facets of agri cul tore and to strengthen the friendships among them 
Members strive for achievement in scholarship, leadership, service, and to further the devdopment of women pursuing careers in agriculture Sigma Alpha works to promote agriculture, and 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 226 



women's role on our campus, in our community and throughout the state Activities include: attending regional and national conferences /conventions; participating in col lege events (Fall 
Bash, ANSC orientation, Cook-Offs); service activities including teaching agriculture to local elementary students and judging contests for the Maryl and FFA; professional Guest speakers, 
and participating in Maryland Day/A g Day. M embershi p rush i s hel d on a semester basis. To be eligible potential members must have 2.25 Cumulative GPA, Agriculture major or sincere 
interest in agriculture be a member of one other group, enrol led in 18 credits, or working 10 hours a week. Visit the web site: www.studentorq.umd.edu/siqma 

University of Maryland Equestrian Club 

The University of Maryland Equestrian Club (UMEC) provideson-campus horseback riding I essonsand equine I earning opportunities for carrpus students and faculty at beginner through 
advanced levels. The ANSC department provides the bam, equipment, ridi ng arenas and horses while the stodents provide care f or the horses. There is a riding fee of $200 per semester for 
one riding lesson a week for the entire semester. Large deductions are easily earned for help with feeding, cleaning stalls or teaching. Club members not riding arestrongly encouraged to 
participate in other club activities, such as educational and fun seminars, field trips and monthly meeti ngs. In the past, UMEC members have attended the Columbia Grand Prix and the 
Washington International Horse Show and taken field trips to the DuPont Veterinary Medical Center inl_eesburg,Va. andDaysEndHorseRescueFarminMaryland. Members have also 
participated in clinics on tack fitting and identifying lameness in horses. Club members, under the leadership of the Executive Board and Directors, make most UMEC club decisions. We 
offer a great opportunity to all students and we're always open to suggestions. We also try to have something for everyone including basic English equitation, Western equitation, dressage 
bareback and trail riding, horse arxJ farm management, veteri nary care teaching skills and much more The UMEC is located at the campus horse barn, and our office is in the Shack, right 
next to the paddocks. There is very United space in the riding lessons, so email us right away to reserve yourself a spot in the most educational equine club provided by the University of Ma 
Maryland Visit the web site www.studentorg.urrri.edu/umec/ 

University of Maryland Equestrian Team 

The Equestrian Team is a competitiveclub, meaning they travel to different schools in the zone and compete in I HSA shows. Students, faculty, staff, and alumni association members of all 
levels are invited. The teamoffers English, Western, and jumping, so team members can pick what type of riding to specialize in or compete in all three! Theteamdoes not hold tryouts so 
anyone can join the team UMET is located about 25 minutes off campus at Clay Hill Stables inSpringdale Maryland. Thecost per semester for team membership is $550. This fee covers 
two one hour group lessons a week taught by trainerTrishaPrettyman, unlimited practice rides (hacks), show fees, show practices, and a ton of fun! 

Veterinary ScienceClub 

The primary objectives of the Veterinary ScienceClub are to: promote a deeper understanding of the numerous opportunities in veterinary medicine, exchange information on veterinary and 

ani rnal experi ences, and keep students updated on the I atest veteri nary school i nf ormati on. 

What does the Veterinary ScienceClub do? A variety of guest speakers are invited to club meeti ngs to talk about their special ties or field of interest A sample of topic include wildlife 

rehabilitation, laboratory animal medicine exotic pet care and veteri nary ethics. 

Each year, faculty from the Virginia- Maryl and Regional College of Veterinary Medici ne speak to club members about veteri nary medical school. Mock interviews are held injanuary to 

prepare our cl ub members for the adrri ssi ons process. 

C I ub sponsored trips offer our members the opportunity to tour various veteri nary medical facilities, talk to veteri nary students and faculty, and to visit local zoos and animal care facilities. 

Annually, the club parti ci pates in the A PV MA National Synposium which is hdd at different veteri nary schools each year. This is an excellent opportunity to visit a vet school, pi us hear 

over 30 speakers on numerous topi cs and parti ci pate i n a vari ety of wet and dry I ab. 

There are also opportunities to volunteer with the PrinceGeorgds County Animal Shelter in partnership with PetSmart, to help find homes for abandoned animals. For more information 

visitthewebsite www.careercenter.urrd.edu/VerSciClub 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

American Sod ety of Animal Sciences Scholastic Recognition and Department of Animal Sciences Scholastic Achievement A wards are presented each year at theCollegeof Agriculture 
and Natural Resources Student Awards Convocation. The ANSC program administers several scholarships, including: C.W. England, Dairy Technology Society, the Kinghome Fund 
Fdlowship, theC.S. Shaff ner A ward, the Lillian Hi IdebrandtRummel Scholarship, and theOwen P. Thomas Devdopment Scholarship. Fordigibility criteria, visit the ANSC Office, 1415A 
Animal Sciences Center. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
parti ci pates in the award ng of scholarships to deserving students For information, visit: www.financialad.umd.edu. 

Anthropology (ANTH) 

Collegeaf Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1111 Woods Hall, 301-405-1423 

www.bsos.urrri.edu/anth 

Chair: P. Shackd 

Professors: J . Chernda (also LASC), M . Leone T. Whitehead 

Associate Professors: J. Frddenberg, M. Paolisso 

Assistant Professors: S. Brighton, W. Stuart 

Lecturers: D. Gadsby, A. Garland, T. Leslie, M. London, M. Plyler, G.Thakur 

Affiliate Professors: A. Bolles(WMST),J . Caughey (AM ST), J . Grayzd (GVPT), J . Hanna, R. Harrison (CMLT, LASC), S. Kim(WMST), D. Linebaugh (HISP), L. Frederik Meer 

(THET), C. Robertson (MUSC) 

Adjunct Professors: S. Abbott-Jamieson (NOAA), M. Butier, T. Cederstrom, C. Crain (LTG Associates), S. Fiske(NOAA), A. Froment S. Huertin-RobertsJ . Kunen (USAID), B. Little 

(National Park Service), F. McManamon (National Park Service), M. Mieri (Smithsonian), C. Puentes-Markides, D. Russdl (USAI D), J. Schablitsky (Adjunct Prof), J. Schndder, R. Sobd 

(Smithsonian), N.Tashima (LTG Associates), R. Winthrop(BLM) 

Professors Emeriti: M. Agar, S. Bushrui, N. Gonzalez (Emerita), F.Jackson 

TheMajor 

Anthropology, the study of culture seeks to understand humans as a whole -as social bd ncp who are capable of symbol iccommuni cation through which they produce a rich cultural 
record. Anthropologists try to explain differences among cultures- differences in physical characteristics as wd I as i n customary behavior. A nthropqlogists study how culture has changed 
through time as the human genus has spread over the earth. A nthropology is the science of the biological evolution of human species, and the disciplined scholarship of thecultural 
devd opment of human bd ngs' knowl edge and customary behavi or. 

A nthropology at the University of Maryl and offers rigorous training for many career options. A strong background in anthropology is a def inite asset in preparing for a variety of academic 
and professional fidds, ranging from the law and business, to comparative literature philosophy and the fine arts. Whether onegoes on to a Master's or a Ph.D., the anthropology B.A. 
prepares one for a wide rangeof non-acaderric employment, such as city and public health planning, devd opment consul ting, program evaluation, and public archaeology. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Having completed the degree program students should have acquired thefol lowi ng knowledge and ski lis: 

1. Students shal I have an i ntegrated knowl edge, awareness and understand ng of a cul tural I y and bi ol ogi cal I y d verse worl d. 

2. Students shal I demonstrate an understand ng of cul ture and soci ety . 

3. Students shall demonstrate the ability to understand complex research problems, andarti cul ate appropri ate methods and theory. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Anthropology department offers beginning and advanced course work in the three principal subdivisions of the discipline cultural anthropology, archaeology, and biological 

anthropology. Withi n each area, the department offers some degree of special izati on and provides a variety of opportunities for research and independent study. Laboratory courses are 

offered i n bi ol ogi cal anthropol ogy and archaeol ogy. F i d d school s are offered i n archaeol ogy. The i nterrd ati onshi pof all branches of anthropol ogy i s emphasi zed. 

The Anthropology department has a total of five laboratories, located in Woods Hal I, which are divided into teaching labs and research labs. The departments three archaeology labs, 

contai ni ng materi alscoll ected from f i d d school s and research proj ects of the past sa/eral years, serve both teachi ng and research purposes. The other two I aboratori es are a teachi ng 

laboratory in biological anthropology and theLaboratoryforApplied Ethnography and Community Action Research. Cultural SystemsAnalysisGroup(CuSAG), a research and program 

devdopment ami of the department is located in Woods Hall. TheCenterfor Heritage Research Studies, located in the Department of Anthropology, focuses on research devoted to 

understanding the cultural characteristics of heritage and its uses. 

The undergraduate cumi cul um is tied to the departments Master in Applied Anthropology (M.A.A.) program accordingly, preparation for non-acaderric employment upon graduation is a 

pri mary educati onal goal of the departments undergraduate course work and i ntemshi p and research components. The department has al so recent! y i mpl emented a Doctor of Phi I osophy 

(PhD) program Students at the graduate I evd are asked to focus in one of three areas of faculty expertise Health, Heritage, and Environment. 

Requirements for the Major 

Students seeki ng an undergraduate degree are requi red to compl ete at I east 31 credi ts of anthropol ogy coursework i n add ti on to the support] ng coursework sequence Every course bd ng 
used to sati sfy anthropol ogy maj or requi rements must be compl eted wi th a grade of C- or hi gher. Students must have a ni ni mum 2.0 cumul ati ve grade poi nt average across al I courses used 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 227 



to saB sfy maj or degree requi remants. 
Required Courses 



ANTH220 
ANTH240 

ANTH260 



I . Foundation Courses 

I introduction to Biological Anthropology 

I ntroducti on to A rchaeol ogy 

Introduction to Sod o-cultural Anthropology and 

Linguistics 

I I . Method and Theory courses (2 courses) 



Credits 

4 
3 



ANTH320* Method and Theory in Biological Anthropology 

ANTH340* Method and Theory in Archaeology 

ANTH360* MethodandTheory inSociocultural Anthropology 

* Two of the upper level rrethod and theory courses (AWH 320, 340, 
360) are required. Students trust complete the rrethod and theory 
course associated with their chosen focus area - sociocultural 
anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology. Students rray 
not take a rrethod and theory course unless they have corrpleted the 
associated foundation course Ifastudentcorrpletesall threeofthe 
rrethod and theory courses, one course can be used as an 
anthropology elective 



III. Anthropology Electives 

Mini mum of 12 credits. 6 of the 12 credits trustee taken at the 

300-400 level. 
ANTHxx Anthropology el ectives 
ANTH300/400Upper level Anthropology courses 



ANTH386 
ANTH496 
ANTH498 
ANTH468B 

ANTH493 

ANTH498C 
ANTH498N 
ANTH498W 

ANTH498Z 

ANTH499 



IV. Applied Field Methods 

Minirmmof3 credits selected fromthe following. Other courses can 

be used with approval ofUG Di rector. Courses used to fulfill the 

AppliedField Methods requirement rray not be used to fulfill any 

other anthropology requirement 

Experiential Learning Internship (3-6 credits) 

Field Methods in Archaeology (6 credits) 

Advanced FiddTraining in Ethnography (1-6) 

Applied Urban Ethnography (3 credits) 

Anthropological Fiddwork and Experience i n Argenti na (3 

credits) 

Advanced FiddTraining in Ethnography: Brazil (6credits) 

Ethnol ogy of the I mmi grant L i f e (4 credi ts) 

J amaica: Connections, Cdebration and Identity (6 credits) 

Jamaica: Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (6 

credits) 

Fiddwork in Biological Anthropology (3-8 credits) 



3 or more 



SKILLSxx 



V. Skills Requirement 

Quantitative course (chosen tromlist below and required for all 
students entering the major Fall 2008 and after) 
BIOM301, MATH111, STAT100, ECON201, ECON321, 
EDMS451, GEOG306, MATH112 or higher (excluding 
MATH113), PSY C200, SOCY 200 



3 or more 



ELECT 



VI . Supporting Course Work: 

Minirrumof 18 creditsof supporting electives: at least 10 credit 
hours trust be outside of the departrrent (with your academic 
advisor's approval) . 8 hours rray be anthropology course work, but 
then cannot 'double count as Anthropology electives 



18 



Advising 

The primary advisor for students in the Anthropology major is the Undergraduate Advisor. The advisor is avail able to students during appointments, walk-in hours, and by phone and 
email. Theadvisorisresponsibleforhdpingstudentsplanthdrsuccessful completionof the Anthropology major. Studentswill work with the advisor for an orientation to the department 
status on degree progress, administrative approval for special course enrollment, academic audits, and graduation clearance Inaddition, students should consider the Undergraduate Advisor 
a resource for general academi c and career advi ce duri ng the r ti me at M ary I and. 

The officeof the Undergraduate Advisor is supervised and supported by the Director of U naergraduate Studies (a faculty rnember) in the Department of Anthropology. Inaddition, all 
faculty members in the department serve as faculty advisors to students. Students are expected to sdectand request a faculty rnember who works within the r area off ocus to bethdr 
faculty advisor (i.e Archaeology, Biological Anthropology or Cultural Anthropology). For more information, or to contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or Undergraduate 
Advisor, please cal I 301-405-1423 or go to www.bsos.urnd.edu/anth. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

There are several undergraduate research experi ences avai I abl e f or students: 

1. Archaeology laboratories 

2. Biological anthropology lab 

3. Chesapeake heritage program 
4. 1 mmigrant LifeCourse 

5. Cultural Systems Analysis Group 

6. Center for Heritage Resource Studies 

For more information, pi ease see our website www.bsos.umd.edu/anth 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 228 



Fiddwork Opportunities 

The Department of Anthropology encourages students to explore itsf idd school and study abroad opportunities: 

1. Summer archaeology field school 

2. Ethnographi c f i el d school i n J amai ca ( study abroad program) 

3. Ethnographic field school in the Brazilian Amazon (study abroad program) 

4. Ethnographi c f i el d school i n A rgenti na (study abroad program) 

5. Winter term field study in Italy (study abroad program) 

For more i nformati on, see our website www.bsos.urrd.edu/anth. 

Internships 

All undergraduate students are encouraged to do an i ntemshi p. There are many non-prof it and government agencies in the Baltimore-Washington area that are willing to support 
Anthropology interns. For more i nformati on, please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Undergraduate Advisor. 

Co-op Programs 

TheDepartmenthasaccoperatjveagreamentwiththeNational Park Service When available, students have opportunities to work on vari ousarcheology and museum projects in the 
National Capital Region. For more information, pi ease contact the Director of UndergraduateStudiesortheUndergraduateAdvisor. 

Honors Program 

T he A nthropol ogy department al so off ers an H onors Program that provi des the student an opportonitytopursuein-otepthstudyof hisorherirterests. Acceptarceiscortingentupona3.5 
GPA in anthropology courses and a 3.0 overall average The Honors Citation is awarded upon completion and review of a thesis (usually based upon at least one term of research under the 
direction of an Anthropology faculty member) to bedone within thef idd of anthropology. For additional information, students should contact the Director of Departmental Honors 
Program Dr. William Stuart, 301-405-1435; E-mail: wstuart@anth.urrd.edu 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Anthropology Student Association (ASA): An anthropology student association that meets regularly to plan student events and to help coordinate various student and faculty activities. For 
meeti ng ti rres contact the U ndergraduate Advi sor. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
parti ci pates i n the award ng of schol arshi ps to deservi ng students F or i nformati on, vi si t: www.financialad.umd.edu 

Architecture (ARCH) 

School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation 

1200ArchitectureBuilding, 301-405-8000 

www.arch.urrd.edu 

archadvi se@umd.edu 

Director: M . Si mon (Assoc Prof & Dir, Assoc Prof) 

Professors: M. Bdl (Prof, Affiliate Prof), R. Etiin (DistUniv Prof), S. Hurtt(Prof), G. Rockcastle (Prof), R. Vann (Prof) 

Associate Professors: C. Bovill (Assoc Prof), R. Eisenbach (Assoc Prof), A. Gardner (Assoc Prof), I. Goumay (Assoc Prof, Affil Assoc Prof), B. Kdly (Assoc Prof) 

Assistant Professors: M. Ambrose (Asst Prof), H. Koliji (AsstProf), P. Noonan(Prof Of Practice), L. Qui ros Pacheco (Asst Prof), I. Williams (Asst Prof) 

Instructors:]. Catania (Lecturer), K. Crenshaw (Lecturer), L. Escobal (Lecturer), B. Grieb (Lecturer, Proj Mgr), G. Hartman (Lecturer), S. Lau (Lecturer), S. Lewis (Lecturer), K. Mdluish 

(Lecturer), P. Mortensen (Lecturer), E. Northen (Lecturer), A. Rubding (Lecturer), R. Schneck (Lecturer) 

Professors Emeriti: W. Bechhoefer (Prof Emeritus), R. Bennett (Prof Emeritus, Lecturer), G. Francescato (Prof Emeritus), J. Hill (Prof Emeritus), R. Lewis (Prof Emeritus), J. Loss (Prof 

Emeritus), K. Du Puy (Prof Emeritus), B. Schlesinger (Prof Emeritus) 

TheMajor 

The School of A rchi tecture, PI anni ng, and Preservati on offers a four-year pre-prof essi onal undergraduate program I eadi ng to the Bachd or of Sci ence degree i n archi tecture Students 
graduatj ng wi th the undergraduate maj or i n architecture typi cal I y requi re two years to compl ete the curri cul um I eadi ng to the prof essi onal degree i n architecture 

Studerts reed verigorcHJsarxdcorrprehensiveiristructj on from a faculty whose nmtes are active in professional practice or research. Many faculty members havedistinguishedthemsdves 
across the professional spectrum and represent different approaches to architectural design. Thar individual areas of expertise include architectural design and theory, history, architectural 
archaeology, technology, urban design and planning, and hi stori c preservati on. Vi si ting critics, lecturers, and the Kea Distinguished Professor augment the faculty; together they provide 
students with the requisite exposure to conternporary realities of architectural design. 

TheB.S. degree in archi tecture will qualify graduates to pursue a career in a number of fid ds, such as construct] on, real estate devdopment public administration, or historic preservation, 
or to continue in graduate work in professional fidds such as architecture urban planning, historic preservation, landscape architecture or law. The programoffers design studios and 
d ecti ves i n drawi ng and vi sual representatj on I eadi ng some of our students to pursue advanced degrees i n graphi c desi gn, i nteri or desi gn, f ashi on desi gn, exhi bi ti on desi gn and other creati ve 
fidds. 

For information see the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation entry in Chapter 6. 

Program Objectives 

The School's mission istoeducateArchitects, Planners, Preservationists, Devdopersand the many allied stakeholders whose work and scholarship focuses on thequality of the built 
environment and promotes social justice cultural value resource conservation and economic opportunity. 

We take advantage of our unique I ocationo in a region that features the nation's capital and the post-industrial City of Baltimore, arxJ I inks the Appalachian Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean 
while surrounding the Chesapeake Bay. Maryland's opportunities and challenges are found in its diverse communities, explosive growth and extensive historic resources. 

Our faculty, students and al umni col I aborati vd y advance the r vi si on and commi tment through research, teachi ng, col I oqui a, wri tj ng, creati ve desi gn, pi anni ng, pol i cy f ormati on and 
prof essi onal work. Our mi ssi on i s hi stori cal I y rooted i n our I and grant mandate and enhanced by our regi oral and i nternati oral acrj vi ti es. 

Academic Programs and Depart m en ta l Facilities 

A rchi tecture L i brary 

Located on the second floor of the Architecture Building, the A rchi tecture library has planning and archi tecture books and periodicals, aswdl as Urban Studies and Planning studio reports. 

There is also a slidecol lection available in the El izabethD. Alley Visual Resources Col lection on the same floor. Librarians are available by appointment to assist with your research needs. 

Visual Resources Center 

The VRC consists of more than 400,000 slides and digital images documenting architecture and the urban scene from pre- historic times to the present Rdated topics include urban design, 
hi stori c preservati on, real estate devd opment, art, I andscape archi tecture as wd I as events around the School . Other vi sual materi al s i ncl ude over 400 DV Ds and vi deotapes, al ong wi th 
I antern si i des and photographs. I mages are acqui red through site photography, scanni ng materi al s, commerci al vendors, and donati ons from faculty and students. 

The School's faculty and students are encouraged to use thecurrent slides as a starting point for research. We are happy to scan items that are not yet in the digital realm I mages and other 
materi al s may be used for presentati ons i n School cl asses and for research. 

Fabrication Lab 

The FabLab at the School of Architecture Planning and Preservation emphasizes the notion of learning to design through the process of making. Our students learn to influence the form 

and meaning of the built environment by workingdi recti y with its material and physical nature We stress the integration of digital and hand fabricati on methods, and explore how 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 229 

traditional technology is affected and transformed by new materials and technique 
Admission to the Major 

Freshman appl i cants: 

htlo://wvwv,admssiorE,unxl,edu/amlv/freshrriariarjplicatJon,cfm 
http://www.admi ssi ore, urrxledu/arolv/architecturecfm 

Transfer appl i cants: 

http://www.lep, urrtl.edu/archsheetpclf 

Advising 

Advising for current students is available by e-mail, or in person. Advising appointments and school tours are conducted by trained peer advisors who can help you navigate admissions, 
course regi strati on, degree pi anni ng and other i ssues. 

Contact Advising by E-mail 

UndercraduatEAiTtiitEcturestudents 

Contact archadvisgaumd.edu with advising questions. 

To schedule an appointment with the advisors, pi ease visit www.arch.unxl.edu/stuclents/aclvi3na/ 
Advi si ng for undergraduates i n the Col I ege i s mandatary each semester. 
Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Student Organizations 

• AIAS- American I r^tute of Architecture Students 

• USGBC- United States Green Building Council 

• NOMAS- National Organization forMinority Architecture Students 

• ASA- Architecture Student Assembly 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Please visit our website for scholarshi p opportuntjes: http://www.arch.urrri.edu/students/financial aid/scholarships school.cfm 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
partj ci pates in the award ng of scholarshi ps to deserving students. For information, vi3t www.financidaid.urrri.edu 

Art(ARTT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1211-E Art/Sociology Building, 301-405-7790 

www.artumd.edu 

artdept@urrri.edu 

Chair: W. Richardson- Painting/Drawing 

Professors: F. Sham- Sculpture J . Ruppert- Sculpture 

Associate Professors: B. Morse- Digital Media, D. Gavin- Drawing/Multi-media, J. Thorpe- Graphic Design, R. Lozner- Graphic Design, R. Klank- Painting/ArtTheory, P. Craig - 

Painting/Drawing, P. Kehoe- Painting/Drawing, M. Humphrey- Printmaking/Drawing, H. Elahi (Assoc Prof) 

Assistant Professors: A. Buck-Coleman - Graphic Design, J. Strom- Printmaking 

Lecturers: A. Georgievska-Shine- Art Theory, R. Weil -Art Theory, N. Ratnapala- Digital Media, L. Bems- Foundation/ArtTheory, E. Conover- Painting/Drawing, L. Hoover - 

Painting/D rawing/Theory, S. Devore- Photography, J . Burrowes- Sculpture/Foundation, S.Jones- Sculpture/Foundation 

Professors Emeriti: C. Demonte(DistJnguished Scholar-Teacher), D. Driskell (Distinguished University Professor), T. Lapinski 

TheMajor 

The Department of Art offers its students a spectrum of experiences that reflect its primary mission: The advancement of a sophisticated and diverse visual culture Fully integrated into 

the liberal arts ideals of the Col I ege of Arts andHumani ties, the undergraduate Art Major provides meaningful programs for both the generali stand the student who intends to pursue art or 

design with professional focus. 

The Departmentcs goal is to provide its students with the technical and conceptual tools needed to makeinrravativeconrjibutionstoacontemporarycultureinwhich traditional boundaries 

between the visual arts, design, film video, and architecture have become increasingly blurred. Students are taught to articulate and refine creative thought and apply knowledge and ski 1 1 to 

the making of images, objects, and expert mental wori<s.ThediversearKj accomplished faculty bring their professional experiences to the teaching studios, providing a contemporary context 

for the development of ski I Is and ideas. From a shared foundation, students move into medi a concentrations that encourage interdisciplinary interaction, particularly with developing digital 

technologies. Thisflexibleinteractionbetweentraditional and new media is central to the success of the Departmentcs mission. 

Artists and designers occupy critical positions in a coritemporary society that increasingly defines itself through visual media. Thecreative environment of the Department studios, 

augmented by courses in the history and theory of art and design, is a fertile ground for the development of the complex ski I Is and ideas that will be needed to navigate visual culture in the 

future 

Program Objectives 

Please go to Department of Art Website for more i nformation: www.arturrd.edu 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

Please go to Department of Art Website for more i nformation: www.arturrd.edu 

Admission to the Major 

The Department of Art offers three tracks to the B.A. degree Track lis an open major, requiring no portfolio review, and requires 48 total credits for completion. All majors enter the 
department i n Track 1. 

Tracks 2 and 3 are specialized tracks with portfolio reviews for admission, and requi re 60 total credits for completion. Track 2 isforaBA with an Advanced Specialization in Digital Media, 
Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture or Intermedia. Track 3 isforaBA with a Concentration in Graphic Design. 

See thedepartment website for more information: www.arturrd.edu 

Placement in Courses 

With appropriate AP credit students may receivecredit for ARTT lOOorARTT 110. Students can recave placement in more advanced courses with portfolio review. Contact Department 
advi sors for more i nf ormatj on. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 230 



Requirements for the Major 

The Department of Art offers three tracks to a Bachelor of Arts Degree(BA). All majors enter the Department i n Track 1, the open BA, and take a required group of six Foundation courses 
(18 credits). After completj on of the Foundati on courses, students may continue i n Track 1 without prtfolioreview, or chcicse to submit a rxirtfolio of work completed inTrackl courses 
for admission into Track 2 or Track 3. Portfolio Reviews for both specializations will take pi ace during the Spring semester, usually during late March. 

• Track L BA in Studio Art This is an open program with no portfolio admission requirement This track provi aes ample space for outside el ecrjves, encourages interdisciplinary 
interaction, and provides double major or double degree possibilities. The Art Education Curriculum works with Track 1. Credit requirements: 36 credits in Studio Art, and 12 credits 
in supporting courses in Art History and/or ArtTheory, for a total of 48 credits. 

• Track 2: BA in Studio Art with Advanced Specialization. This track is restricted to students admitted by competitive portfolio review, and is aimed at students who envision 
graduate study or professional careers i n art. Students accepted into this track will complete, in addition to the requirements for Track 1, a 12 credit advanced specialization in 
specific media areas, including ARTT 481: Advanced Specialization Seminar. Areas of specialization include Digital Media, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, and Intermedia 
Credit requirements: 48cr. listed inTrackl plus 12 cr. inAdvancedSpecializations,foratotal of 60credits. 

• Track 3: BA in Studio Art with a Concentration in Graphic Deagn.This track is restricted to students admitted i nto theGraphic Design Concentration through a competitive 
portf ol i o revi ew. Thi s program provi des a pre- prof essi onal ori entarj on emphasi zi ng i nteracti ve desi gn, graphi c desi gn theory, and i nterdi sci pi i nary research. Students accepted i nto the 
Graphic Design program must complete a specific sequence of courses at both the 300 and 400 level. G raphi c Design courses are only avail able to students who have been admitted to 
theGraphic Design Concentration. Credit requirements: 21 credits in Foundation and studio art el ecrjves, and 12 credits in supporti ng courses in Art History and/or Theory (ARTT 
361 Design Literacy: Decoding Our Visual Culture, a Graphic Design Concentration requirement, satisfies 3 credits of the supporting area for Graphic Design students) for a total of 
60 credits. 

Students interested in Track 2 may apply after the completj on of at I east two 300- level courses, plus completion or enrol I mart in ARTT 418. Students may re-apply onetime. 

Students i nterested i n Track 3 must have compl eted or be enrol I ed i n the requi red Foundarj on courses to appl y ta the specialization. The strict coui^erequirerreTts in Graphic Design make 
early application to Track 3 optimal. Students may re-apply one time 

Transfer students who have completed courses equivalent to the Foundation and intermedi ate courses atUMCP may apply immediately to Tracks 2 or 3 if they choose 

These are conpetitiveprcqrams with a I irnit of approximately 20 new students per year in the combined Art areas, and approximately 20 students per year in Graphic Design. For 
i nformarj on about the Portf ol i o Revi ew process for Tracks 2 and 3 pi ease see the Department of A it Website 

N o course grade below the grade of C- may count toward the major. An overall GPA of 2.0 in the major is requi red for graduation. 
Track L BA in Studio Art -48 total credits required to complete major 
Foundation Courses IB Gratis 

• ARTT 100 Two Dimensional Design Fundamentals 

• ARTT 110 Elements of Drawi ng I 

• ARTT 150 IntroductiontoArtTheory 

• ARTT 200 Three Dimensional Art Fundamentals 

• ARTT 210 Elements of Drawi ng 1 1 

• ARTT 255 Introduction to Digital Art and Design Processes 

Intermediate Courses 9Cnecfts 

Choose three courses total from at least two areas on this list 

• Painting (ARTT 320) 

. Sculpture (ARTT 330, 331, 332, 333) 

• Pri ntmaki ng (A RTT 340, 341, 342, 344) 
. Digital Media (ARTT 370) 

Advanced Courses 9 Credits 

• ARTT 418 Advanced Drawing Studio 

• One 300/400-levd ARTT elective 

• One400-levd ARTTor ArtTheory elective 

Supporting Area: 12 Credits 

. ARTH 200, ARTH 201, pi us two 300/400-le/e! ARTH or ArtTheory dectives 

• (Department recommends ARTH 351: Twentieth Century 1945 to present) 

Track 2: BA in Studio Art with an Advanced Specialization: 

12 credits in addition to 48 credits required inTrackl; 60 total credits required to complete major. 

Course Requirements for Areasof Advanced Specialization in Studio Art Advanced madi a courses end ng i n 8 or 9 are repeatabl e up to 12 credits. 

Digital Med a: 

• ARTT 479 Advanced Digital Media Studio (2 repeatable 3 cr. courses) - 6 credits 

• Option: ARTT 479 or ARTT 353/449 (Photo) or 34x/448 (Printmaking) - courses that emphasize digital processes. (3cr. of ARTT 498 Directed Studies may be substituted for ARTT 
479 cr.) -3 credits 

• ARTT 481 Advanced Specialization Seminar. Track 2 students only. Students i n Department Honors Program may substitute the Honors Seminar for this course - 3 credits 

Painting: 

• ARTT 428 Advanced Painting Studio (Three repeatable 3 cr. courses) (3cr. of ARTT 498 Directed Studies in Art may be substituted for ARTT428) - 9 credits 

• ARTT 481 Advanced Specialization Seminar. Track 2 students only. Students i n Department Honors Program may substitute the Honors Seminar for this course -3 credits 

Printnaking: 

• Opti on: A RTT 34x or A RTT 448 - 3 credits 

• A RTT 448 A dvanced Pri ntmakingStudi o(Two repeatable 3 cr. courses) (3cr. of 498 Directed Studies may be substituted for 448 credit)- 6 credits 

• ARTT 481 Advanced Specialization Seminar. Track 2 students only. Students i n Department Honors Program may substitute the Honors Seminar for this course - 3 credits 

Sculpture 

• Option: ARTT 33x or ARTT 418* or ARTT 438 - 3 credits 

• ARTT 438 Advanced Sculpture Studio (Two repeatable 3cr. Courses) (3 cr. of ARTT 498 Directed Studies in Art may be substituted for438 credit) - 6 credits 

• ARTT 481 Advanced Specialization Seminar. Track 2 students only. Students i n Department Honors Program may substitute the Honors Seminar for this course - 3 credits 

Interrredia: 

• ARTT 4xx Advanced Studios (Combination of inter-related courses) (3 cr. of ARTT 498 Directed Studies in Art may be used for 4xx credit) - 9 credits 

• ARTT 481 Advanced Specialization Seminar. Track 2 students only. Students i n Department Honors Program may substitute the Honors Seminar for this course - 3 credits 

Track3: BA in StudioArtw/ Concentration in Graphic Design 
60 total credits required to complete major. 

I ntermedi ate and Advanced G raphi c Desi gn courses are restri cted to students who have been accepted into the Desi gnCorcentrati on by an application process arri competitive portf olio 

revi ew. A 1 1 Track 3 students must sati sf y the f ol I owi ng requi rements: 

Requirements 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 231 



• Foundation and Supporting Area courses listed in Track 1BA (see ARTT 361 below) - 27 credits 

• ARTT 386 or 45x Graphic Design Electi ves - 6 credits 

• ARTT 3xx/4xxArtElectives-6 credits 

• Requi red Graphic Design Area of Concentration Courses - 21 credits 

Graphic Design required courses - 21 crafts 

• ARTT 355: Intermediate Graphic Design Principles 

• ARTT 356: Graphic Design Processes 

• ARTT 357: InteractiveGraphic Design 

• ARTT 454: Advanced Graphic Design Principles 

• ARTT 455: Three- Dimensional Graphic Design 

• ARTT 458: Graphic Design Portfolio 

• ARTT 361: Design Literacy: Decoding Visual Culture Satifies3cr. of the Art Hi story or Theory supporting area. 

GrapMc Dea'cfi elective courses Student choice! 6 crafts. 

N ot al I courses are offered every semester. Some are offered duri ng Summer and Wi nter terms. 



• ARTT 386: 
, ARTT 456: 
, ARTT 457: 
, ARTT 459: 

• ARTT 488: 
, ARTT 499: 



Experiential Learning (Graphic Design I ntemship only) 

Motion Design 

Advanced I nteracti ve Design 

Advanced Graphic Design Studio 

Special Topics in Graphic Design 

Directed Studies in Graphic Design 



Other Requirements for the Major 

Please go to Department of Art Website for more i nformation: www.arturrd.edu 

Certificate 

The Department of Art offers no Certificate programs. 

Advising 

The clepartrrert assigns advisors to its majors by class/credit hours. Thenarreof the aclvisor for each class is available in the department office Each second-semester sophormre and 
first-semester senior is required to see his or her advisor within the department. Additionally, each student is strongly encouraged to see his or her advisor in the department each semester. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

A variety of undergraduate research and/or internship experiences are avail able Pleasegoto Department of Art Website for rmre information: www.art.umd.edu 

Fiddwork Opportunities 

A variety of undergraduate fi el dwork and/or internship opportunities are avail able PI ease go to Department of Art Website for more information: www.artunxl.edu 

Internships 

Students have worked in a variety of internship settings. These have included assisting professionals complete public commissions, commercial or cooperative gallery and exhibition duties, 
and working in professional artists' workshops in the Balti rmre and Washington, D.C. metropolitan areas. TheGraphic Design concentration maintains a variety of internship connections 
with the professional design community. Additional informationisavailableintheDepartmentof Artoffice 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program is availableto art studio majors for thepurposeof creating opportunities for in-depth study and enrichment in areas of special and creative interest To qualify, students 
must be art majors with junior or senior status, amajorG.P.A of 3.2, and an overall G.P.A. of 3.0. The program requi res a total of 12 credits in Honors course work. Two courses (3 credits 
each) may betakenatti"ie300or400-levd, and two courses (3 credits each) at the400-level. There is a thesis component in one of the400-levd courses. Pleaseconsult the Honors Director 
for additional information. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Student Art League is an active student organization tiiatenccnjrages membership and participation for all majors. Art majors participate in many campus-wideorganizations. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department of Art administers a ght Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships (CAPAs) that are avai I able to continuing students, aswdl as entering freshman and transfer students. 
This is a merit-based scholarship that is awarded on a oneyear basis, and may be renewed. Additional information is available in the main office of the department. The Van Crews 
Scholarship is designated for outstanding Art majors concentrating in graphic design. It is awarded for one year and is renewable F urther details are aval able on the department website 
www.artumd.edu 

Awards and Recognition 

Each semester the faculty votes for students to recave 1st 2nd, and 3rd place cash prizes for thej ames P. Wharton Award. Students are given the awards based on works exhi bited in the 
Graduating Seniors Exhibition in the Herman Mari I Gallery. 

Each year, the department holds a competition for thej ohn Dorsey Prize for Curatorial Excd lence The wi nner reed ves a cash award and funds towards the production of a curated 
exhibition in the Herman Mari I Gallery. 

Other awards are gi ven on an i rregul ar basi s, dependi ng on the fundi ng. 

For more information, go to the department website www.art.umd.edu 

ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (ARTH) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1211-B Art/Sociology Building, 301-405-1479 

www.arthistory.umd.edu 

Chair: M.Venit 

Professors: J . Hargrove, J . Kuo, S. Mansbach, W. Pressly, M . Venit A. Whedock 

Associate Professors: R. Ater, A. Colantuono, M . Gill, J . Shannon, Y . Suzuki, A. Volk 

Assistant Professors: S. Hill, A. McEwen 

Lecturers: B. Bland (Lecturer), A. Georgievska-Shine (Lecturer), L. Martinez (Lecturer), G. Metcalf (Lecturer) 

Affiliate Professors: F. Kdly, R. Spear 

Professors Emeriti : D. Denny (Prof Emeritus), M . Spi ro (Assoc Prof Emerita), J . Withers (Assoc Prof Emerita) 

TheMajor 

The faculty and students of the Department of Art History and Archaeology form a dynamic nucleus within a major research university. The program leadingtotheB.A. degree in Art 
History, provides a diverse sdection of courses in the art and archaeology of Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. The goal of the department is to devd op the students critical 
understanding of art history and visual culture 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 232 



The department has strong coverage in Western art from the classical period up to the present. Inaddition, by taki ng advantage of the unusual diversity of faculty interests, students can 
study in areas not traditionally offered in departments of art history arid archaeology, such as the art of Africa, art of the African diaspora, art of Latin America, and Chinese and Japanese 
art Studies in archaeology rr^bepursuedinccoperationwithotherUniversitydepartrnents. 
Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym ARTH. 

Program Objectives 

The Department of ArtHistoryandArchaeology'sB.A. program equipsits majors with critical knowledgeof art history and visual culture The program promotes visual literacy inthe 
history of art from around the world and from prehistoric times to the present It cultivates strong research, written, and critical thinking skills; and develops students' abilities to synthesize 
cultural, historical, political, and social information as it bears upon the visual arts. 

Progr am Learning Outcomes 

Students are expected to fully engage with the curriculum and the opportunities presented for learning and research. H avi ng completed the B. A. in Art History, students should have 
acqui red the f ol I owi ng abi I i rj es: 

1. An ability to demonstrate knowledgeof a large set of artistic monuments, objects, and performances in their cultural, historical, political, and/or social contexts. 

2. An ability to communicate effectively about art in writing, applyi ng compl ex forms of analysis in essay-length papers using clear and concise prose 

3. An ability to employ the appropriate technologies for conducting research in the hi story of art, including print sources and/or electronic information. 

4. Anability to recognize and understand fundamental art historical methods including but notlirrited to connoisseurship, stylistic chronology, visual and technical analysis, historical 
contextual izati on, and theoretical evaluation. 

Academic Programs and Depart m en ta l Facilities 

The location of the university between Washington and Baltimoregives students the cipportunity to use sorre of the finest museum and archival col lections in the world for their course 
work and independent research. The ctepartment encourages students to hold i rtemships at a number of these instituti oris. Curator/professors, exhibitions in galleries at the University of 
Maryland, interactive technologies, and the extensive use of study collections complement traditional classroom I earning. 

The department is in the forefront of exploring digital imaging technologies for art historical and archaeological teaching, research, andpublication.TheMichelleSmithCollaboratoryfor 
Visual Culture, located in the clepartment on the fourth floor of the Art/Sociology Building, iscentral in creating a nurturing environment for academic research and creative learning. This 
new space permits ample workspace for meetings, workshops, forums, and the execution of large-scale technical projects 

Requirements for the Major 

Requi rements f or the maj or i n A rt H i story are as f ol I ows: 

Crafts 
Onefrom 3 

ARTT100 Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals 
ARTT110 Elements of Drawing I 

ARTH required courses 

ARTH2xx threeARTH courses at the 200 level 9 

ARTH300/400sa/en ARTH courses at the 300-400 level 21 

Supporting Area: 12 

A support ng area of four courses i n coherent y re! ated 
subj ect matter outsi de the department of A rt H i story and 
Archaeology at the 300-400 level 

No credit toward trie major can be received for ARTH 100 or 355. 

No course with a grade lower than C- nay be used to satisfy major or supporting area requi rements. 

An overall GPA of 2.0inthemajorisrequired for graduation. 

Other Requi rements for the Maj or 

In the Department of A it Hi story and Archaeology, 300-level and4O0-level courses are differentiated. 300-levd courses focus on peri odor topical surveys and 400-level courses highlight 
content- or theme- based material. Majors should complete the 200-level surveys before they enroll in300- or 400-level courses. Students are strongly encouraged to take supporting area 
courses that complement the art hi story major. NocoursewithagradelowerthanC- may be used to satisfy rraj or or supporting area requirements. 

Requi rements for theMinor 

Therri nor in Art History introduces students to a range of art-historical periods, problems, and methodologies and is intended at once to broaden and deepen the students knowledgeof arts 
and humanities. A total of 18 credits is required. 

1. Ninecreditsof 200-levd surveys in the history of art are required. Choose any three(3) broad surveys from among the foil owi ng3-credit courses: 

. ARTH 200: Art of the Western World to 1300 
. ARTH 201: Art of the Western World after 1300 

• ARTH 250: Art and Archaeology of Ancient America 
. A RTH 275: A rt and A rchaeol ogy of Af ri ca 

• ARTH 290: Arts of Asia 

2. Inaddition, nine(9) creditsof upper-level art history courses are required. Choose any three (3) upper-division (300- or 400-level) 3-creditcoursesinArt History (ARTH prefix). 

A total of six (6) credits may be transferred into the minor from other institutions or programs. These transferred credits include those from study-abroad programs. Study-abroad credit 

requi res the prior approval of theDirectorof Undergraduate Studies. 

All courses presented for the minor must be passed with a grade of C- or better. Beginning with students matriculating in Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must 

have a mini mum C (2.00) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy ni nor requi rements. 

To make an appoi ntment to expl ore or decl are a mi nor, 

go to ltto://www.arhu.urrrl.edu/undergraduate/academcs/ninor5 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors. 

Internships 

Students may receive academic credit for internships via ARTH 386. This course may count as one of the seven 300/400-level ARTH courses requi red for completion of the ARTH major. 
Prerequi si tes: perni ssi on of ctepartment and 60 semester hours compl eted. A 1 1 students are requi red to compl ete an A RTH I ntemshi p Contract, avai I abl e f rom the undergraduate advi sor. 
Qual i fi ed maj ors shoul d consul t wi th the D i rector of U ndergraduate Studi es for i nternshi p opportuni ti es. 

Honors Program 

If you havecompleted at least 12 credits in Art History and Archaeology courses and if you have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher (in all course work, not just ARTH courses) you are 
qual if i ed to work toward departmental honors at graduati on. Such honors wi 1 1 be noted on your official transcri pt Consul t the Di rector of U ndergraduate Studi es for detai I s A mong your 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 233 



sa/en 300/400-levd ARTH courses required for the major, you must take at least onecolloquium(dtherARTH 488 or 489) and you also must take Methods of Art History (ARTH 496). In 
addition to the regular requirements for the major, you must research and write an Honors Thesis (ARTH 499), normally in the year when you will graduate Before registering for this 
courseyou must identify and gain the support of a faculty supervisor. The faculty supervisor must bea regular member of the ARTH department faculty. Adjunct faculty members do not 
supervise honors theses. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The Department of Art History and Archaeology has an active Undergraduate Art History Association. I nterested students should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for more 
information. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
parti ci pates in the awarding of scholai^ips to desewing students. For information, visit: www.financialad.umd.edu 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Art History and Archaeology offers four undergraduate awards each year: theJudithK. Reed Scholarship to an ARTH major of junior standi ng; theJudithK. Reed 
Commencement Award, and the George Levitine and Frank DiFederico Book Awards to graduating ARTH seniors. 

Asian American Studies C ertifi cate 

Office of Undercraduate Studies 

1145 Col e Student A crj vi tj es B ui I di ng, 301-405-0996 

www.aasturrd.edu 

aast@umd.edu 

The Certificate in Asian American Studies involves students in critical study of the experiences of Asian Americans. Through an interdiscipli nary approach, students examine the hi stories, 

communities, and cultures of Asian Americans as both distinctive from and connected to the broader themes for diversity, ethnicity, race gender and mi grati on in the Americas. 

Requirements for Certificate 

The Certificate in Asian American Studies requires at least 21 credits: 6 credits in core courses (AAST200 and A A ST201); 12 credits in elective courses (from among AAST offerings or, 

with program approval, from among courses offered outside AAST); and a capstone courseof 3 credits (AAST 378 or AAST388). Students must earn a grade of C- or better in any course 

that counts toward the Certificate in Asian American Studies. Beginning with students matriculating in Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have a mini mum C 

(2.00) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy undergraduate certificate requirements. 

Note The Certificate in Asian American Studies was suspended beginning fall 2009. The Asian American Studies Program currently offers a 15-credit academic minor; see Chapter 6 for 

detai I s on the A si an A meri can Studi es M i nor. 

Astronomy (ASTR) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1205 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 301-405-3001 

www.astro.urrd.edu 

astj-grad@deans.urrd.edu 

Chair: S. Vogd 

Director: E. McKenzie (Res Assoc) 

Professors: L. D. Deming, D. Hamilton, A. Harris, S. McGaugh, M. C. Miller, L. Mundy, R. Mushotzky, E. Ostriker, K. Papadopoulos, C. Reynolds, S. Veilleux 

Associate Professors: D. Richardson 

Assistant Professors: A. Bolatto, M . Ricottj 

I nstructors: G. Demi ng 

Lecturers: M. Hayes-Gehrke R. Oiling (Res Assoc), A. Peel, P. Romani 

Adjunct Professors: J . Centrdla, E. Dwek, N. Gehrels, M . M umma, N. White 

Professors Emeriti: M. A'Heam, R. Bell, J. Eari.W. Erickson.J. Harrington, M. Leventhal, D. Wentzd 

Visiting Faculty: D. Neufeld 

TheMajor 

The Astronomy Department offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Science in Astronomy as well as a series of courses of general interest to non-majors. Astronomy majors are given a 
strong undergraduate preparatj on i n A stronomy, M athematj cs, and Physi cs. The degree program i s desi gned to prepare students for posi tj ons i n government and i ndustry I aboratori es or f or 
graduate work i n Astronomy or rel ated fi el ds. 

Academic Programs and Depart m en ta l Facilities 

The Department of Astronomy is a partner i n the Corrbi ned A rray for Research i n M i 1 1 i meter-Wave Astjororry (CARM A) which operates a mill i meter wavdength radio array located near 
Bishop, California. The array is the largest and most sensitive array of its type in the worid. As of early 2012, the Department is also pursuing anew partnership in a major optical 
telescope The Department is involved with major space missions, such as NASA's EPOX I mission which visited Comet Hartley 2 i n 2010. Additional ly, the Department operates a smal I 
observatory on campus which has four fixed telescopes ranging in aperture from 20" to 7" and six portable 8" telescopes. This facility is used for undergraduate majors' classes and for 
small-scale research projects, aswdl as for an Open House Program for the public. Finally, the Department maintains and upgrades a Beowulf cluster for computation- intensive science 
projects. Opportunities are avail able for undergraduates to become involved in research with all of these facilities. 

Requirements for the Major 





Required Courses 


Credits 


ASTR120 


1 ntroductory Astrophysics: Solar System 


3 


ASTR121 


1 ntroductory Astrophysics 1 1 : Stars and Beyond 


4 


ASTR310 


Observational Astronomy 


3 


ASTR320 


Theoretical Astrophysics 


3 


ASTR4-- 


400 levd astronomy courses 


6 


PHYS171* 


Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Rdatjvity 


3 


PHYS174 


Physics Laboratory 1 ntroductjon 


1 


PHYS272* 


Introductory Physics: Fidds 


3 


PHYS273* 


1 ntroductory Physics: Waves 


3 


PHYS275 


Experimental Physics 1: Mechanics and Heat 


2 


PHYS276 


Experimental Physics II: Electricity and 
Magnetism 


2 


PHYS374 


IntermediateTheoretjcal Methods 


4 


PHYS401 


Quantum Physics 1 


4 


PHYS404 


1 ntroductjon to Statistical Thermodynamics 


3 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 


4 


MATH 141 


Calculus II 


4 


MATH240 


1 ntroductjon to Li near Algebra 


4 


MATH241 


Calculus III 


4 


MATH246 


Differential Equationsfor Scientists and 
Engineers 


3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 234 



*Withthepernissionoftheadvisor, PHYS 161, 262, 263 can be substituted for this sequence 

The program requires that a grade of C- or better be obtained in ail courses required for the major. Beginning with students matriculating inFal I 2012, to be awarded a baccal aureate degree, 
students must have a rrini mum C (2.0)cumulativegradepointaverageacrossall courses used to satisfy major degree requirements. 

Detailed information on typical programs and alternatives to the standard program can be found in the pamphlet entitled, Department Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Astronomy whi ch i s avai I abl e f rom the A stronomy Department off i ce 

Requirements for the Minor 

Astronomy 

A Mi nor in Astronomy may be earned by completing the foil owing with grades of C- or better. BeginnirgwithstudentsmatricularjnginFall 2012, to be awarded a baccal aureate degree, 
students must have a rrini mum C (2.0) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy mi nor requirements. A narjpointment must be made to register for the minor before 
final 30 credits are taken. Please 

contact Department for compl ete ml es and procedures. 

C recite 

ASTR100 Introduction to Astronomy, OR 3 

ASTRlOlGeneral Astronomy, OR 4 

ASTRl-any other Introductory sequence in Astronomy 

ASTR220 Collisions in Space 3 

Three from 

ASTR300 Stars and Stellar Systems 3 

ASTR330 Solar System Astronomy 3 

ASTR340 OriginoftheUniverse 3 

ASTR380 LifeintheUniverse-Astrobiology 3 

ASTR498 Special Problems in Astronomy 3 
C RSxx Or a course approved by the department 3 

Planetary Sciences 

The Departments of Astronomy and Geology jointly sponsor a minor program in Planetary Science Details about this rri nor and its course requirements are provided in Chapter 8. 

Internships 

Many undergraduate students do astronomy research internships at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. M ore i nf ormati on i s avai I abl e on the department website under 'U nderqraduate 
Research '. 

Honors Prog-am 

The Honors Program offers students of exceptional ability and interest in Astronomy opportunities for research participation. Honors students work with a faculty advisor on a research 
project for which academe credit is earned. Certain graduate courses are open for credit toward the bachelor's degree (Students are accepted into the Honors Program by the Departments 
Honors Committeeon the basis of grade point average or recommendation of faculty.) Honors candidates enrol I inASTR 399, compl ete a research project write a thesis and do an oral 
presentation before a committee Satisfactory grades lead to graduation With Honors (or High Honors) in Astronomy. 

For Ackitional I nfbrmation 

F urther i nf orrrarj on about advi si ng and the H onors Program can be obtai ned by cal I i ng the Department of A stronomy off i ce at 301-405-3001. Students who have been away more than two 
years may find that due to cum culum changes the courses they have taken may no longer be adequate preparation for the courses required to compl ete the major. Students in this situation 
must meet with the Departmental Advi sor to make appropri ate pi ans. 

Atmospheric and Oceanic Science (AOSC ) 

Cdlegeof Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

3417 Computer and Space Sci ences B ui I di ng, 301-405-5391 

www.atnxs.umd.edu 

Chair: J. Carton 

Professors: A. BusalacchiJ . Carton, R. Dickerson, R. Hudson, E. Kalnay, Z. Li, X. Liang, R. Murtugudde, S. Nigam, R. Pinker, R. Salawitch, D. Zhang 

Associate Professors: K. Ide, N. Zeng 

Assistant Professors: T. M iyoshi 

Adjunct Professors: E. Berbery, C. Brown, R. Colwell (DistUnivProf Emerita, Affiliate Prof), H. Van Den Dool, B. Doddridge M. Evans, R. Higgins, M. King, D. Kirk-Davidoff, V. 

Kousky, K. Pickering, A. Thompson, L. Uccdlini, A. Vemekar, R. Zhang 

Professors Emeriti: F. Baer, R. Ellingson 

The Major 

F undamental concepts from mathemati cs, cherri stry, physi cs, and computer sci ence are appl i ed to understand the basi c pri nci pi es that control our weather and cl i mate from extreme events 
I ike tornadoes to the milennial changes of ice ages and the results of human modification of our environment. Coursework in the first two years errphasizes mastery of these fundamentals 
Coursework in the last two years provides a comprehensive survey of atmospheric and oceanic science whilespecialty courses and guided research allow the student to develop expertise in 
an area of concentration. The Department has particular strengths incorrputerrnoaying and rerrote sera ng of the afr atmospheric chemistry, and climate studies. In 

addition to the Department, nearby research laboratories such as the NOA A National Centers for Environmental Prediction and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center offer the student many 
research opportunities. Courses offered by this department may be found under the following acronyms: AOSC 

Program Objectives 

The Atmospheric and Oceanic Science B.S. program seeks to educate majors in the basic pri nci pies that control our weather and the interaction between atrmsphere and ocean that regulate 
Earthes climate Students will be provided with practical experience as researchers and creators of knowl edge, and equipped with the requirements for a full range of careers in Atmospheric 
and Oceani c Sci ence, as wd I as f or rel ated areas i n secondary educati on, graduate school , i ndustiy, and publ i c servi ce 

Academic Proejramsand Dep artm e nta l Facilities 

Our departrnent hosts an undergraduate major, three undergraduate mi nors, a professional masters and a full academe graduate program Theoverlapbetweentheprofessional masters 
program and the undergraduate program al I ows i ncorri ng freshman to earn both a bachel ors and a masters degree i n f i ve years. We bel i eve that research i s an essenti al part of an 
undergraduate expert ence and require all our majors to compl ete a senior thesis as part of their education! 

We maintain computer labs for the useof our students in addition to the computer facilities provided by the university, with all major operating systems represented. Several of our research 
groups also have their own compute clusters, and those who need to access still more powerful computing resources can use NASA, NOAA ahdNCAR machines. The department hosts 
several large disk arrays for local data storageandgeneral-usecomputeclustersfor student useinclasses and on small projects All are accessible from our laboratories. 

We have a state of the art rooftop meteorological laboratory, which currently houses standard meteorological i nstruments and more than a dozen atmospheric cherri stry measurements. This 
facility also frequently hosts instruments from nearby research laboratories such as NASA and NOAA. A short distance away, our department runs an atmospheric chemistry, precipitation 
and deposition field site at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. 

Closely affiliated clepartments and programs, the Earth System Science I nterdisci pli nary Center (ESSIC) and thejoint Global Change Research Institute (J GCRI) are in the M Square 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 235 



development immediately east of the main campus, and numerous world-class federal facilities are a short walk or drive away. The new NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction 
with 700 NOAA researchers is housed next to E SSI C andJGCRI i n the M Square development just east of US Route! NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is five rriles down the road, 
and the National I nstituteof Standards and Technology, Naval Research Labs, Environmental Protection Agency, and many more are also located in the Washington, D.C. Metro area. All 
have hi red our graduates and host frequent col I aboratjons with our faculty and students. 

Admission to the Major 

The major in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science is not a limited enrol I merit program (LEP), so there are no formal requirements for entry into the major. Successful students generally have 
a sol i d background, eami ng good grades i n mathematj cs, physi cs and chemi stry. 

Requirements for the Major 

AOSC200* Weather and Climate 3 credits 

AOSC201 Weather and Climate Laboratory 1 credit 

AOSC431 Atmospheric Thermodynamics 3credits 

AOSC432 Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Oceans 3 credits 

AOSC494 Seminar 1 credit 

AOSC493 Senior Research Project I 3 credits 

AOSC498 Senior Research Project 1 1 3 credits 

, Computing and Data Analysis: Deciphering Climate 3 rr ~jjt- 
Change Clues 

AOSC4XX** Upper Level Major Elecrjves 6credits 

Four of the following fTwe classes: 

AOSC400 Physical Meteorology of the Atmosphere 3 credits 

AOSC401 ClimateDynamicsandEarthSystemScience 3credits 

AOSC424 Remotesensing 3credits 

AOSC433 Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate 3 credits 

AOSC470 Synoptic Meteorology 3 credits 

CHEM 135 General Chemistry for Engineers 3credits 

CHEM 136 General Chemistry Laboratory for Engineers 1 credit 

MATH 140 Calculus I 4credits 

MATH 141 Calculusll 4credits 

MATH241A Calculuslll 4credits 

MATH246A Differential Equations 3 credits 

PHYS161AA General Physics: Mechanics and Particle Dynamics 3credits 

PHYS174AA Physics Laboratory Introduction lcredit 

PHYS 7fi0AA General Physics: Vibration, Waves, Heat Electricity ■= rrer |i tx= 
and Magnetism 

PHYS261AA G^.J^=VibTtfcf*W^He* credit 

E I ectri a ty and M agnetj sm ( L aboratory ) 
PHYS 270AA General Physics: Electrodynamics, Light, Relativity 3cred j te 

and Modern Physics 

nuvcnuM General Physics: Electrodynamics, Light, Relativity . ... 

mi j i/i m .... „ lcredit 

and M odern Physics Laboratory 

*Or another AOSC course at the 200 level 

**For a detailed list see our website for AOSC majors 

AThe sequence for math majors may also be used: MATH 340, 341 

f^ThesequenceforphysicsrrBJorsmayalsobeused: PHYS171, PHYS174, PHYS272, PHYS275, PHYS273 

The program requires that a grade of C- or better be obtained in all courses required for the major. Beginning with students matriculating in Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccalaureate degree, 
students must have a rrini mum C (2.0) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy major degree requirements. 

Detailed information on the major can be obtained by consulting our major website and making an appointment with an AOSC advisor. 

Advising 

Advising for Atmospheric and Oceanic Science majors is mandatory every semester. Students who need to make an advi si ngappoinrret should contact the Associate Director of the 
undergraduate program i n Atmospheric and Oceanic Science 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

M any of our present undergraduate students, regardl ess of thei r maj or, have sought out and obtai ned productive i ntemshi ps i n the Washi ngton, D.C. area. These experi ences (whether at 
NASA, NOAA, EPA, DOE or other federal or state agencies) are important both to our studentsoacaderric careers, as they provide context and generate ideas fori ndependent research 
projects, and to their professional careers. In light of this importance, we have made an undergraduate senior thesis mandatory for all AOSC majors (see the courses AOSC 493 and 
AOSC498). Our majors have the opportunity and are required to perform research! Nonmajors may also participate i n undergraduate research through AOSC499 or informally with 
individual professors and research scientists. 

Honors Program 

Each year, the AOSC Honors Program Committee reviews the academic records of AOSC majors. Students with a minimum 3.00 overall GPA and a mini mum 3.30 major GPA will be 
added to the AOSC Honors List For students on the AOSC Honors list certain graduate courses are open. To receivea citation of "with honors in atmospheric and oceanic science" the 
student must: 

• Haveearned a 3.00 or higher overall GPA and a 3.30 or higher GPA for all AOSC maj or required courses at graduation time 

• Pass two approved AOSC graduate level classes with a grade of B- or better. 

• Pass an Honors Oral Exarri nation i n his or her senior year. 

To receive a citation of "with high honors in atmospheric and oceanic science" he or she must complete the requirements for honors and receive a high pass for the thesis. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The undergraduate program features an actj ve student chapter of the A meri can M eteorol ogi cal Soci ety. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The department maintains awards for highly qualified undergraduate students. Pleasecontact the department for details. 

BEHAVIORAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH (HLTH) 
School Of Public Health 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 236 



2387 School of Public Health Building, 301-405-2463 

www.dpch.umd.edu 

brmnisgiurrcl.edu 

Chair: E. Glover 

Professors: K. Beck, B. Boekdoo, P. Clark (Res Prof), R. Fddman, R. Gold, M . Wang 

Associate Professors: S. Desmond, C. Holt, D. Howard, R. Sawyer, C. Voorhees (Res Assoc Prof) 

Assistant Professors: J . Butler, S. Daughters, C. Fryer, M . Garza, K. Green 

Instructors: A. Anderson-Sawyer, A. Bayley, G. Gilbert, J . Hodgson, M. Reynolds, K. Sharp, T. Zeeger 

Prof essors Emeriti: J. Greenberg 

The Major 

Students graduate with a Bachdor of Science degree in Community Health which prepares students for entry-levd health education positions in a variety of corrmunity health settj ngs: 
worksite health promotion, research and devdopmant, hospitals, and health agencies. 

Program Objectives 

The Department of Behavioral and Community Health promotes the devdopmant of behavioral and community health educators who understand the science, theory, and practice of public 
heal th and can appl y thi s knowl edge toward the enhancement of popul ad on heal th status. 

Prog-am Learning Outcomes 

Asaresultof the undergraduate program in community health, students will beableto: 

Identify individual and community levd needs for health promotion and disease prevention. 

Identify principles of community health that are needed for the devdopmant of effective health promotion and disease prevention stategies. 

A ppl y starj stj cs and research methods to accuratd y descri be the di stri butj on and exami ne the determinants of population health. 

Apply statistics and research methods to community health program evaluations. 

Descri be how to pi an, i rmlement and administer short and long term community health interventions. 

Communi cate and disseminate the results of community health program evaluations. 

Describe how to advocate for effectivecommunity health initiatives at the local, state and federal levds. 

Identify strategies that effecrjvdy incorporate cultural competence within health promotion and community health initiatives. 

Requirements for the Major 

In addition to the University's general education requirements, students must fulfill four other general sets of requi remants: General Electives, Supportive Requirements, Health Electives, 
and Professional Preparation. HLTH491, theCommunity Health Internship, is completed during the students final semester and after all other course work has been successfully completed. 



Community Health Major 



Credits 
120 





Supportive Requirements 


HLTH130 


1 ntroduction to Public & Community Health 


HLTH140 


Personal and Community Health 


HLTH230 


1 ntroduction to Health Behavior 


BSCI105 


Principles of Biology 


BSCI201 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 


BSCI202 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 1 




Health Electives 


HLTH106 


Drug Use and Abuse 


HLTH285 


Control 1 i ng Stress and Tensi on 


HLTH371 


Communicating Health and Safety 


HLTH377 


Human Sexuality 


HLTH38X 


Pear Education 


HLTH430 


Health Education in the Workplace 


HLTH437 


Consumer Behavior 


HLTH460 


Minority Heal th( summer only) 


HLTH471 


Woman's Health 


HLTH476 


Death Education 


HLTH498T 


Medical Terminology (Summer & Winter) 


KNES360 


Physiology of Exercise 


NFSC100 


Elements of Nutrition 


SPHL 





21 

3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 

18 



Professional Preparation 

HLTH200 I ntroducti on to Research in Community Health 

HLTH300 I ntroduction to Biostati sties 

HLTH301 I ntroducti on to Epidemiology 

HLTH391 Principlesof Community Health I 

HLTH420 MethodsandMaterialsinHealth 

HLTH490 Principlesof Community Health 1 1 

HLTH491 Community Health Internship 



30 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
12 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 237 



Advising 

Advising is not mandatory, but it is recommended that students periodically schedule an appointment via departmental website to appropriately track thdr progress in the major. The 
Community Health major has three advisors: 

1. J ennifer Hodgson: jhodgson@urrd.edu, 301-405-25231 

2. Allison Bayley: abayley@unxl.edu, 301-405-8729 

3. Tracy Zeeger: tzeeger@umd.edu, 301-405-3453 

Internships 

Thefinal semester of the program is dedicated to a full -time, 16- week internship that the student will have identified in the previous semester's required courseHLTH 490. Theinternship 
coordinator isAnneAnderson-Sawyer, MA. aasawyer@umd.edu. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
parti ci pates in the award ng of scholarships to deserving students. For information, vi3t www.financialaid.umd.edu 

Awards and Recognition 

DBCH Undergraduate Award Descriptions 

The Department of Behavioral and Community Health has evolved significantly over the past few years, and is currently comprised of faculty, staff and hundreds of students who share in a 
passion to improve health outcomes of i ndivi duals and communities. Each year, our Department recognizes some exceptional students by honori ng them with awards in recognition of 
their achievements. A listing of all Behavioral and Community Health sponsored awards follows. 

Please note that students nay apply for only one award. 

Sharon M. Desmond Carmmify Service Award 

This award honors Dr. Sharon Desmondcs more than 20-year involvement and commitment to improving health within the local community. Serving as a professor within the Department 
of Behavioral and Community Health si nee 1989, she teaches about public health from a social justice perspective, addressing health disparities that result from racism and lack of access to 
care Dr. Desmond has worked diligently with communities surrounding the University to empower them through health education. In 1999, she was instrumental in founding a health 
partnershi p between the city of Seat Pleasant, M D and the university. Since its birth, she has served as secretary, chairperson, and co-chairperson of the Seat Pleasant-University of 
Maryland Health Partnership (SP-UM HP) and has been actively involved in all partnership programs and activities. 

Each spring, the Department of Behavioral and Community Health presents this award to an undergraduate who has demonstrated dedication to his or her community in a health- related 
capacity. The award will begiventoastudentwithacumulativeGPA of 3.0 or higher, who has completed at least 2 semesters in theCommunity Health major, and who has regularly 
participated in community service activities. To apply, pleaseemail your full name and university ID, as well as a 1-2 page (maximum) narrative about why you deserve this award, to 
Beverly M onis afrypni staumd.edu by February 1st The subject line of your email should read, nDesmond Community Service A ward.6 

Robin C. Sawyer Health Teaching/ConmricaSon Award 

This award honors Dr. Robi n Sawyercs more than 25-year commitment to a high standard of teaching excel I enceand heal th communication. Dr. Sawyer has received numerous awards for 
his exciting and effective classroomteachi ng methods, including the most prestigious University of Maryland Regentcs Award for Teaching Excellence which identifies the most 
outstanding teacher among 5,000 faculty in the University of Maryland System His unwavering commitment to teaching has led to over 450 presentations at schools, colleges, and 
universities throughout the United States, and his innovative approach to education has made his Human Sexuality course one of the most popular classes on our campus. Dr. Sawyer has 
also written and produced 5 sexuality films that have garnered 14 national and international film awards. Through his Methods and Materials in Health course, Dr. Sawyer continues to teach 
our majors how to become effective communicators of health information. 

Each spring, the Department of Behavioral and Community Health presents this award to an undergraduate who demonstrates promise and involvement in public/community health 
presentations and teaching. The award wil I be given to a student with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher, who has completed at least 2 semesters i n the Community Health major, and who 
has effectively taught or presented on a health-related topic. To apply, pleaseemail your full name and university ID, as well as a 1-2 page (maxi mum) narrative of why you deserve this 
award, to Beverly M onis aVnonisOurrd.edu by February 1 st The subject I ine of your emai I should read, rSawyer Health Teaching/Communication Award.6 

Beck-Felctmn Public Health Research Award 

Thi s award honors Drs. Kenneth Beck and Robert Fddmancsmore than 30-year commitment to public health research. Both serve as full professors withinthe Department of Behavioral 
and Community Health. Dr. Beck has worked with numerous federal, state and local agencies to research issues surrounding injury prevention, traffic safety, graduated licensing and 
risk-taking behaviors. He has focused specifically on the effectiveness of breath alcohol ignition locks at preventing impaired driving, and the effects of parental monitoring on teen alcohol 
involvement Dr. Fddmancs major areas of research have focused on investigating worksite smoking cessation among government workers in Costa Rica and Latino immigrant construction 
workers in Maryland. He has also examined the effectiveness of interventions to encourage healthier eating among low income women in the Women, Infant and Chi I dren(WIC) program 
and infant nutrition programs for Latina mothers. 

Each spri ng, the Department of Behavioral and Community Health presents thi s award to an undergraduate who has a demonstrated i nvol vement i n health research projects. The award wi 1 1 
be given to a student with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher, who has completed at least 2 semesters in the Community Health major, and who has had some i nvol vement i n research. To 
apply, pleaseemail your full name and university ID, as well as a 1-2 page (maximum) narrative of why you deserve this award, to Beverly Monis afamonisOurrd.edu by February 1 st The 
subject line of your email should read, nBeck-Fddman Public Health Research A ward.6 

David Hyde Award 

Thisaward honors Dr. David Hydecsmorethan 20 year involvement with the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. As the former Undergraduate Program Director, Dr. Hyde 
advised literally hundreds of students, assisting them in reaching their academic, professional, and personal goals. His open door policy, personable demeanor, and realistic approach to 
probl em sol vi rig made hi m popular among Community Health students. Dr. Hyde al so taught courses in stress management and was passionate about hd pi ng students cope with and control 
stress inthdr academic and personal lives. Retiring in 2010, Dr. Hyde has had the opportunity to pursue his I ongtime interest in photography. 

Each spring, the Department of Behavioral and Community Health presents this award to an undergraduate who has demonstrated strength inthefaceof adversity. The award will be given 
toastudentwithacumulativeGPA of 3.0 or higher, who has completed at least 2 semesters in the Community Health major, and who has experienced adversity during his or her 
undergraduate career. To apply, pleaseemail your full name and university ID, aswdl as a 1-2 page (maxi mum) narrativeof why you deserve this award, to Beverly Monis atbmonis@umd.e; 
bmoni s@urrri.ed bv February 1 st The subject I i ne of your emai I should read, nDavid Hyde A ward.6 

DorisSandsAward 

This award honors Dr. Doris Sands, a renowned sexuality educator who was recognized for her tremendous teaching skills and ability to reach thousands of students during her time at the 
University of Maryland (1964-1986). Dr. Sands began her career as a school nurse and happened to identify and diagnosea serious illness in a young high school student This early 
intervention saved the young manes life and many years later, in honor of this action, the grateful man set up a scholarship in the name of Dr. Sands. Throughout her teaching career here 
at Maryland, Dr. Sands was wd I known for her direct manner and fearlessness regard ngeducati on around human sexuality. She was a trail blazer in this regard, and hdped to normalize 
issues of sexual health in her immensdy popular Human Sexuality course 

Each spring, the Department of Behavioral and Community Healths Undergraduate Program Committee sdects (no application) a student to reed ve this award based on strong motivation 
and prom se i n the fi d d. 

FISCHELL DEPARTMENT OF BIOENGINEERING (BIOE) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 238 



A.James Clark School of Engineering 

2330 J eong H . K i m E ngi neeri ng B ui I di ng, 301-405-7426 

www.bioeunxl.edu 

bioeundergrad@urrd.edu 

Chair: W. Bentiey (Prof, Chair) 

Director: J. Fisher (Assoc Prof, Assoc Chair, Undergraduate Program Director), P. Kofinas (Prof, Assoc Chair, Graduate Program Director) 

Professors: P. Bryan, G. Payne Y . Tao 

Associ ate Professors: J. A randa-Espinoza, E. Eisenstein, K. Herald, A. Hsieh, H. Montas, S. Muro, B. Shapiro 

Assistant Professors: Y . Chen, S. M atysiak, I . White 

Lecturers: I. Villanueva 

Professors Emeriti: A.Johnson 

TheMajor 

Bioengi neeri ng is a field rooted in physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and life sciences. Each of these areas is applied in a systematic, quantitative and integrative way to approach 
probl ems i mportant in biol ogy, bi osystems, medi cal research, and cl i ni cal practi ce B i oengi neeri ng advances fundamental concepts, creates knowl edge from the rrnl ecul ar to organ to 
system levels, and develops innovative processes for the prevent] on, diagnosis, and treatment of disease In short bioengi neering seeks to improve the health and lifeof humankind on 
many levels. 

Bioengineers specialize in those products and processes made from used with, or applied to biological organisms. In addition to engineering science and design, bi oengi neers study cell 
biology, physiology, bioinformatics, bioimaging, and biomechanics. Thesynthesisof engineering and biology gives bioengineers uniquecapabilitiesinour modern world. 

For more information about the Bioengi neering major, pi ease visit www.bioeumd.edu/undergrad 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Bioengineeri ng is accredited by the Engineeri ng Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abetorg. 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore MD 
21202-4012, telephone: (410) 347-7700. 

Program Objectives 

The undergraduate program in the Fischell Department of Bioengi neeri ng provides students with a broad and fundamental education relating engineering with the biological sciences.The 
program has focuses in biomedical devices, human health, biotechnology, and ecosystems. These focuses all contai n components of fundamental sciences, design, and conmuni cations 
ski 1 1 s. The students' educatj onal achi evements al I contri bute to enabl i ng a wi de range of career paths after graduati on. 

Our graduates are grounded in fundamentals that will serve them throughout their professional careers. They will have an understanding of human behavior, societal needs and forces, and 
the dynamics of human efforts and thei r effects on human health and that of our erwironment With these underpinnings and abilities, we have defined several Program Educational 
Objectives weexpect our graduatesto attain in 3-5 years after graduation: 

1. Our graduates are ei ther conti nui ng thei r educatj on or are gai nf ul I y empl oyed i n bi oengi neeri ng or rd ated prof essi ons; 

2. Our graduates participatein lifelong learning activities that will further the r careers arid the r impact on society; 

3. Our graduates serve thei r prof essi on and conmuni ty . 

Program Learning Outcomes 

M aryl and bi oengi neers gai n a broad- based educati on i n whi ch engi neeri ng approaches are used to urxJerstarxd ardirrprove living systems and thei renvironnxrts. We educate students to 
excel in the field of bioengi neering and carry out research, development, and commercialization of bioscience systems and tools that will improve the lives of people throughout the world. 
The sped f i c Student Outcomes detai I ed by the B i oengi neeri ng Program are detai I ed bd ow. 

a An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engi neering 

b. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data 

c. An ability to design a system component, or process to meet desired needs within real istic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, 
manufacturability, and sustai natality 

d. An ability to function on multi disciplinary teams 

e An ability to identify, formulate and solve engi neering problems 

f. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibiiity 

g. An ability to communicate effectively 

n. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineeri ng solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context 

i. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning 

j . A knowl edge of contemporary i ssues 

k. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modem engi neering tools necessary for engi neering practice 

Additional Bioengi neering Objectives: 

1. An abi I ity to perform measurements on and to i nterpret data from I i vi ng systems. 

2. Background knowl edge to support understanding of interactions between living and non-living materials and systems. 

3. A n abi I i ty to appl y starj stj cs to bi oengi neeri ng appl i carj ons. 

Admission to the Major 

Students who wish to study at the A. J amas Clark School of Engineering apply for admission to the University of Maryland; there is no separate application for engi neering. When filling 
out the university application, you may choose bioengi neering as your intended major. You may also apply as an undecided engi neering major. 

All B ioengi neeri ng majors must meet admission, progress, and retention standards of the A. James CI ark School of Engineering. 

Please note: If you are applying to Bioengi neering as a transfer student (whether you are an internal Clark School transfer, external UMD transfer, or transferring from an outside institution), 
thenyoumustcornpleteBlOE 120 with a 3.0 or better before you will be admitted into the department If you wish to enrol I, please send an email with your UID 
to bioeunderqrad@urrri.edu , Youwill bewill be notified by email when perrrissi on has been granted. 

Requirements for the Major 

Following is the list of the course requirements for the Bioengi neering Undergraduate Program Each student following the course template should be able to graduate in four years. Each 
student will meet with his/her Faculty Advisor every semester to plan the scheduleof courses for the subsequent semester. Someof the students in the bioengi neering program may el act to 
pursue professional degrees such as Medical, Dental, Law, etc., thus they may need certain courses that those prof essi onal schools require and should discuss their plans with their Faculty 
Advisor. Someof these courses may count as el actives towards the major. Students interested i n health professions may ail so view the requi remenrs at www.prehealth.urrd.edu . 

FRESHMAN YEAR Fell Spring 

P A A ™ Calculus I 4 

MATH141 Calculus II 4 

i-Ljcmoc General Chemistry for , 

Engineers 

/-uciun^c General Chem for .. 

CHEM136 EngimereLab 1 

Introduction to Engineering 
ENES100(SP)Design(**canfetatoifeHor 3 

sring) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 239 



ENES102 

ENGL101 

(AW) 

PHYS161 

(NS) 

BIOE120 

BIOE121 



Mechanics I (**can betaken 
1st or 2nd semester) 

I introduction to Writing 

General Physics 

B i ol ogy f or E ngi neers 

B i ol ogy f or E ngi neers L ab 

Humanities (HU) 

Total 



15 



3 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Calculuslll 
Differential Equations 
Organic Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry Lab 
Cell Biology and 
Physiology 
Mechanics 1 1 



MATH241 

MATH246 

CHEM231 

CHEM232 

BSCI330 

ENES220 

PHY S260 and General Physi cs 1 1 

(NL) YS261 G 319 " 31 ^^ 511 Lab 
BIOE241 Biocomputati on Methods 



BIOE232 Bioe Thermodynamics 



Fall 
4 

3 

1 

3 
3 

1 



Spring 



BI0371 


Bioe Math and Stats 




3 


BioSci 


Elective 1* 




3 




Total 


15 


16 




JUNIOR YEAR 


Fall 


Sprin 


BIOE331 


Biofluids 


3 




BIOE332 


Transport Processes Design 




3 


BIOE340 


Physiological Systems and 
Lab 


4 




BIOE404 


Biomechanics 


3 




BIOE420 


Bioimaging 




3 


BIOE453 


Biomaterials 




3 


BIOE457 


Biomedical Elecandlnstr 


4 




BIOE331 


Biofluids 


3 




BioSci 


Elective 1 




3 




Humanities (HU) 


3 






Oral Comm (OC) 




3 




Total 


17 


15 




SENIOR YEAR 


Fall 


Sprin 


ENGL393 


Technical Writing 


3 




BIOE4S5 


Capstone 1 


3 




BIOE4S6 


Capstone 1 1 




3 


BioSci 


Elective II* 




3 


Eng Sci 


Elective 1** 


3 




Eng Sci 


Elective II* 




3 


Unrestricted 


Elective 1 

History and Social Sci (HS) 


3 






History and Social Sci (HS) 




3 




Scholarship in Practice(SP) 


3 






Total 


15 


15 




Total Credits for Degree 




127 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 240 



*Please visit www,bio&urrd,edu/underarad/ua-ta:hnical-electives.html for a list of approved technical electives. 

**Second benchmark requi remsnts must be completed one year after students are reviewed for the gateway requirements and include All 100 and 200 level MATH, PHYSandENES 

courses; BIOE 120, BIOE 121.CHEM 231.CHEM 232andBSCI 330. Third benchmark requirements must be completed one year after students are reviewed for the secorrirjerchmark 

and include At I east one 300 level or above BIOE course an approved biological science or engineering science technical elective; BIOE 232, BIOE 241 and BIOE 331. 

***AII students must complete two Distributive Studies courses that are approved for I -series courses. The Understanding Plural Societies (UP) and Cultural Competence (CC) courses may 

alsofulfill Distributive Studies categories. 

Advising 

Every student majoringinbioengineering is assigned a faculty advisor. You will receive an email from the department with your advisor assignment at the beginning of your first semester in 
the department All students are to meet with their advisor each semester before they will be able to register for the next semester's courses. It is hoped that the advisor will also serve as a 
mentor and confidante Please feel free to contact hi rrVher with any questions and concerns you may have throughout your academe career. Any additional questions about the program 
may be directed to the Bioengi neeri ng Undergraduate Off ice bioe-underqradOurrd.edu , 2330JeongH. Kim Engineering Building, 301-405-7426. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

All students in our major have the opportunity to participate in research i n state-of-the-art labs on campus or at surrounding government or industrial locations, either through projects 
withinthe Department or through the Engineering Co-op and Career Services office Special programs include theASPI RE Program inwhich students collaborate with faculty and staff on 
real - worl d engi neeri ng proj ects www.aspi re urrd.edu; the M aryl and Center for U ndergraduate Research, whi ch assi sts students i n f i ndi ng on and off campus research opportuni ti es 
www.uqresearch.urrd.edu; andtheNSF-sponsored Molecular & Cellular Bioengi neeri ng Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which focuses on the engagement of 
undergraduate researchers in bioengi neeri ng research activities both at UMD and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) www.bioeurrri.edu/reu 

Honors Program 

We are pleased to announce thecreation of the Fischdl Department of Bioengi neeri ng Undergraduate Honors Program The goals of this program are to encouragethe participation of 
exceptional undergraduate students in cutting-edge bioengi neeri ng research during the r junior and senior years. The honors program has been desigmd to corrplernent team-based design 
proj ects and coursework that are part of the undergraduate curriculum Guiddinesincludethefollowing: 

Students shoul d appl y for admi ssi on to the H onors Program i n the spri ng of thei r sophomore year. 

Students must have completed at least 60 credits by the end of thei r sophomore year. 

Students should select a faculty mentor engaged i n bioengi neeri ng research. 

With input from this mentor, students should propose an independent research proj ectto be completed during thei rjuni or and senior years. 

Students will submit a progress report detailing their research progress in the spring of their junior year. 

Students will submit a written thesis and present their research in the spring of their senior year. 

Faculty mentors must commit to guide the student through his/her research project and provide appropriate facilities to complete the proposed project 

Faculty mentors must submit a brief statement indicating sufficient research progress in the spring of the students junior year. 

Students are wd come to parti ci pate i n other honors programs, but research compl eted for the departmental honors program may not be used to sad sfy the requi rements of another honors 
program 

H onors wi 1 1 be conferred at graduati on upon compl erj on of the enrj re two-year program 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Society of Biological Engineers (SoBE) us the University of Maryland, Col lege Park chapter of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). SoBE's mi ssi on is dedicated to the 
advancement of biotechnology, biomedical engineering, and professional ism in the field, as well as fostering friendships among biological engineers. For more information, visitwww.studentc 
www.studentorg.urrd.edu/sob e/ 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The University and the A. James Clark School of Engineering offer a range of financial support to talented undergraduate students enrol led at the School. Offerings include the A. James 
Clark Endowed Scholarship fund and the Benjamin T. Rome Scholarship. Our program is competitive, with awards made on the baas of merit, financial need, and other factors. For more 
information on a variety of scholarships, pleasevisi twww.ursp.umd.edu 

In addition, the Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assi stance programs and, in cooperation with other university 
offices, parti ci pates in the awarding of scholarships to deserving students. For information, pleasevisi twww.financialaid.umd.edu 

We also have several departmental annual awards and scholarships that students may appl yard be selected based on their scholastic achievements, service to the department and the 
profession. These award are open to juniors and seniors in the program Information on these annual awards and scholarship may be obtained from the faculty advisors in thedepartment 

Awards and Recognition 

Fischdl Dept of Bioe Outstanding J unior Award presented by Chair: outstanding academic achievement and contributions to thedept (2 students) 

Fischdl Deptof Bioe Outstanding Senior Award presented by faculty; academic achievement and contributions to the profession and department (2 students) 

Seymour& FayeWolfeScholarship: Bioengi neeri ng student (1 student). 

Jeffrey C. andSandraW. Huskamp Scholarship: Bioengi neeri ng student (1 student) 

M el D. Schatz Scholarship: Bioengi neeri ng student (1 student) 

Outstandi ng Research A ward: contribution to research including hours spent in lab, co-authorship of papers, significant breakthroughs in area of research. Ability to maintain high GPA 
whi I e perform ng research wi 1 1 al so be consi dered. 

Outstanding Volunteer Award: hours spent performing and the nature of volunteering activities considered. Maintaining high GPA al so consi dered. 

Outstanding Citizen Award: overall contribution to department university, profession, and society considered. GPA will be taken into account as well. 

Biological Sciences Program (BSC I) 

Cdlegeof Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences 

1322 Symons Hall, 301-405-6892 

http://chembi o.umd.edu/urdergraduateprograms 

Dr.JoellePresson, Assistant Dean Academe Undergraduate Programs; Dr. FranciscaSaavedra, Assistant Director Biological Sciences Program 

TheMajor 

The Biological Sciences major is jointly offered by the Departments of Biology, Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics, and Entomology in the Col lege of Computer, Mathematical, and 
Natural Sciences.AH Biological Sci ences majors complete a common sequence of introductory and supporti ng courses referred to as the Basic Program In addition, students must complete 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 241 



an Advanced Program wi til n one of the fol I owi ng sped al i zati on areas: 

• Cell Biology & Genetics (CEBG) 

• Ecology & Evolution (ECEV) 

• General Biology (GENB) 

• Microbiology (MICB) 

• Physiology & Neurobiology (PHNB) 

• Individualized Studies (BIVS) 

A compl ete I i st of sped al i zati on area requi rements can be found on our website chembi o. umd.edu/undergraduateprograrns. N ote that the I ndi vi dual i zed Studi es sped al i zati on ( B I V S) 
requi res perni ssi on of tne Assi start Dean of U ndergraduate A cademi c Programs, and i nvol ves an approved proposal to do coursework i n the Col I ege and i n other disci pli nes. F urther 
questions about Biological Sciences can be directed to the Undergraduate Academic Program Office at 301-405-6892. 

Biological SciencesattheUniversityof Maryland at Shady Grove 

The Biological Sciences Program at the University of Maryland offers a degree program at Universities at Shady Grove The Biological Sciences Program at Shady Grove offers the 
Advanced Program courses normally taken in thejunior and senior years. More information is avail able at: 
chembi o. urrri.edu/undergraduateprograms/bi ol ogi cal sci encesprogramatshadygrove 

Pra^am Learning Outcomes 

1. Students should have mastered the critical knowledge at each level i n the curriculum that is necessary to move on to the next I eve! in the curriculum 

2. Students should demonstrate an ability to use and apply quantitative methods, especially: interpretation of graphical or tabular data; expression of physical, chemical, or biological 
process in mathematical form; solving equations to determine the value of physical, cherrical, or biological variables. 

3. Students at the lower level shoul d demonstrate an ability to carry out key experimental techniques used in the chemical and life sciences disciplines. 

4. Students at the lower level shoul d have a basic understanding of how to express questions as a hypothesis, how to design a test of a hypothesis, and how to gather and analyze simple 
data. 

5. Students at the upper level should be able to integrate and apply a relevant body of basic knowledge to the evaluation of existing scientific studies and to design studies to test specific 
hypotheses that includes design elements typically found in a specific field of thechenical and life sciences. 

6. Students should effectively communicate in writing the processes of science and the results of scientific inquiry. 

Admission to the Major 

The Biological Sciences major is a Limited Enrollment Program Please sea the admission requirements and procedures at: 
chentiio.urrri.edu/urxtergraduateprograms/advisir^ 

Requirements for the Major 



Crodta 



General Education Program Requirements 



Base Program in Biological Sciences 

BSCI105 Principlesof Biology I 

BSCI106 Principlesof Biology II 

BSCI207 Principlesof Biology III 

BSCI222 Principlesof Genetics 



15 

4 
4 
3 
4 



MATH 130 or 

MATH140 
MATH 131 or 

MATH141 
CHEM 131/132 
CHEM231/232 
CHEM241/242 
CHEM271/272 
PHYS121or 

PHYS141 
PHYS122or 

PHYS142 



Supporting courses 

Calculus I 

Calculus 1 1 

Fundamentals of General Chemistry /Lab 

Organic Chemistry I / Lab 

Organic Chemistry II /Lab 

GenChemSi Energetics/GenBioanalytical Lab 

Fundamentals of Physicsl, or 

Principlesof Physics 

Fundamentals of Physics II, or 

Principlesof Physics 



30-32 

3 

4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



Advanced Program in Specialization Area 

See websi te f or detai I s of sped al i zati on A rea 
requirements. 



27 



ELECT 



Electi ves 



J5-JS 



Advising 

Advising is mandatory during each pre-registration period for all Biological Sciences majors. All freshmen and new transfer students will be assigned an advisor from theCollegeof 
Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences Student Services advising staff. Students will be assigned to a departmental faculty advisor once a basic sequence of courses has been 
successfully completed. The departmental faculty advi sors are coordinated by the fol I owing persons for the indicated specialization areas. These coordinating advising offices can be 
contacted for maki ng appoi ntments with an advi sor or for any other i nformati on regard ng that specialization area. 

Straney 1225 H.J. Patterson 301-405-2766 CEBG.GENB.MICB 

Jensen 2227 Biology- Psychology 301-405-6904 ECEV, PHNB 

Kent 3142 PI ant Sciences 301-405-3911 GENB 

Presson 1322 Syrmns Hall 301-405-6892 BIVS, Education Double major 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 242 



Honors Prog-am 

Outstandi ng students are encouraged to apply to departmental Honors Programs. Through the Honors Programs students will become actively involved in theongoing scientific research at 
the university. Information about these honors programs may be obtained from theUndergraduateAcademic Programs Office, 1322SymonsHall, 301-405-6892. 

Biology (BIOL) 

Cdlegeof Chemical and Life Sciences 

2227 Biology- Psychology Building, 301-405-6904 

www.biol.urrd.edu 

bioundergrad@umd.edu 

Chair: G.Wilkinson (Prof) 

Professors: G. Borgia, C. Carr, A. Cohen, M. ColombiniJ. Dietz, W. Fagan, C. Fenster, D. I nouye, W. J effery, T. Kocher, R. Payne A. Popper, M. Reaka, S. Sukharev, S. Via 

Associate Professors: I. Ades, A. Bely, K. Carleton, M. Cunnings, M. Dudash, I. Forseth, E. Haag, W. Higgins, K. Lips, C. Machado, E. Quinlan.J. Simon 

Assistant Professors: R. Araneda, D. Butts, C. Castillo-Davis, P. Kanold, N. Kraft (Visit Asst Prof), J. Singer (Asst Prof), D. Scares 

I nstnxtors: J . Opoku-Edusei 

Lecturers: R. Compton (Senior Lect), R. Infant: no (Senior Lect), B. Parent 

Professors Emeriti: G. Anastos, E. Clark, J. Corliss, D. Gill, A. Haley, R. Highton, S. Pierce 

TheMajor 

The Department of Biology is committed to an integrative understanding of organisms ranging from processes occurring at the level of molecules to human impacts on global ecological 
processes. This integrative approach is evident in the variety of courses we offer. Courses offered by Biology may focus on the function of molecules or cells (eg. Membrane Biophysics, 
Mammalian Histology, Neurophysiology), on the integration of organ systems (eg. Vertebrate form and function, Mammalian Physiology), on the interaction of organisms with each other 
and their environment (eg. Animal Behavior, Plant Ecology, Population Ecology), on evolutionary process and diversification (eg. Principles of Evolution), and/or on the relationship 
between humans and their environment (eg. Biology of Conservation and Extinction). In addition to a strong foundation in basic biology, our faculty provide students interested in medical 
careers with courses that discuss medical applications (Biology of Cancer, Diseases of the Nervous System) and evolutionary considerations. Our program has particular strengths in 
neuroscience, evolutionary developmental biology, and ecology. Our diverse faculty, and our linkages with other institutions such as the National Institutes of Health and the Smithsonian 
institution, provide students with a wealth of research opportunities to prepare themfor careers in medicine, conservation biology, public policy, and more 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the following acronym(s): BSCI, BIOL, NACS, BISI 
Program Learning Outcomes 

• Students should have mastered the critical knowledge in biology relevant to the next stage in their career. 

• Students should demonstrate an ability touse and apply appropnatequantitativerrethodsinthe biological sciences 

• Students be able to critically evaluate and integrate scientific findings in the biological sciences arri apply this understanding to areas of professional and public interest. 

• Students should be able to effectively communicate in writing the processes of science and the results of scientific inquiry. 

• Students should master experimental design and laboratory ski I Is relevant to the next stage in their career. 

Requirements for the Major 

See Biological Sciences Programelsewhere in this chapter, or contact the Department of Biology Undergraduate Office 

Advising 

Students are assi gned an advi sor based on thei r area of sped al i zati on. The Department of B i ol ogy f acul ty ccordinate arri aclvisestuclents who specialize in Physiology and Neurobiology 
(PHNB), Ecology and Evolution (ECEV), and the Environmental Science and Pol icy- Biodiversity & Conservation Biology concentration (ENSP-BIOD). Contact toe Department of 
Biology Undergraduate Off ice 405-6904, for information about advising or to schedule an appointment For advising in other Biological Sciences Specialization areas, see the Biological 
Sci ences Program I i srj ng i n thi s catal og. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

The biology department offers a wealth of undergraduate research opportunities.Students doi ng undergraduate research with a Biology Department faculty member serving as advisor or 
co-advisor may sign up for credit under BSCI 399 or BSCI399H, or may do research on a volunteer basis. More general information on research opportunities in the Biological Sciences 
may befound at: rtto://chen±)io.unxl.edu/undergraduateprograms/researchandi ntemshi ps 

Honors Program 

The Department of Biology Honors Program offers highly motivated and academically qualified stuclentstheopportunitytoworkclosely with a faculty mentor on an original, independent 
research project. Students are required to parti ci pate in the program for at I east three semesters and need not liave been admitted to the Honors Col lege in order to participate Contact the 
undergraduate off i ce for more i nf ormati on. 

Business, General 

For information, see M anagement & Organization elsewhere in Chapter 7. 

CELL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (CEBG) 

CoHeyeof Chemical and Life Sciences 

1109 Microbiol ogy Bui I ding, 301-405-5435 

www.cbmg.unxl.edu 

Chair: N. Andrews (Prof) 

Director: D. Straney (Assoc. Prof) 

Professors: N. Allewdl, N. Andrews (Char), C. Chang, T. Cooke, C. Ddwiche J . Dinman, S. Hannenhalli (Assoc Prof), S. Hutcheson, R. Mariuzza (IBBR), R. Mariuzza (IBBR), D. 

Mosser.J. Moult(IBBR),J. Moult (IBBR), D. Nuss(IBBR), A. Simon, D. Stein, H. Sze 

Associate Professors: S. Benson, V. Briken.J . DeStefano, N. El-Sayed, S. Hannenhalli (CBCB),J . Kwak, Z. Liu, K. Mclver, S. Mount, W. Song, R. Stewart, W. Winkler, L. Wu (IBBR) 

Assistant Professors: K. Cao, B. Fredericksen, A.Jose V. Lee S. Walsh (IBBR) 

Lecturers:J. Buchner, K. Frauwirth, E. Moctezuma, P. Shields 

Affiliate Professors: M. Colombini (Biol), I. Hamza(AGNR), W.J effery (Biol), I. Mather (ANGR), S. Salzberg(CBCB) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: I. Ades (Biol), D. Perez (AGNR), L. Pick(Ent), M. Pop(CBCB), L.Taneyhill (AGNR), S. Xiao (IBBR) 

Adj unct Professors: J. Culver (IBBR), P. Hobart(USAMRIID), A. McBride (Adjunct Prof), B. Moss (NIH),V. Vakharia(UMBI), O. White (TIGR), R. Wickner(NIH) 

Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Freed (NCI), K. Green (NIH) 

Professors Emeriti: G. Bean.T. Cook (Prof Emeritus), R. Doetsch, E. Gantt(DistUniv Prof), F. Hetrick, S.Joseph, G. Patterson, M. PdczarJ. Reveal, B. Roberson, R. Weiner, R. Yuan 

TheMajor 

The department participates in the teaching arri advising of students in the Biological Sciences Program specifically in the Specialization Areas of Cell Biology & Genetics (CEBG), 
Microbiology (MICB), and General Biology (GENB). Our courses are taught in four basic areas that represent faculty research interests and experrj se including: 

• Cell and Developmental Biology 

• Genetics and Genomics 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 243 



• Microbiology, Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology 

• Plant Biology 

Requirements for the Specialization Areas 

See Biological Sciences Programcatalog entry for more information on thedegree requirements. 

Admission to the Major 

TheBSCI major is a limited enrollment program PI ease refer to the limited enrollment programs page at http://www,lep, urrri.edu ' for further i nformation. 

Requirements for the Major 

See Biological Sciences Programcatalog entry for more information on the degree requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory for certain students (freshmen, change in major, GPA of 2.5 or below). The Department in coordi nation with the Student Affairs Office of the Col lege of Chemical 
and Life Sciences administers the advising of students in the Biological Sciences specialization areas of Microbiology, Cell Biology and Genetics, and General Biology. Advising 
assignments can be found by contacrj ngtheCel I Biology and Molecular Genetics Undergraduate ProgramOffice, 1212 H.J. Patterson Hall (301-405-2766) or seethe site 
www.cbmg.umd.edu/undergrad/advi si ng.com 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students may participate in Department hosted research experiences in faculty laboratories or laboratories at off campus locations. PI ease contact the Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 
U ndergraduate Off i ce ( 301-405-2766) for more i nf ormati on or see the si te httD://www.cbrm.urrri.edu/undergraduate/researchopportunities 

Honors Program 

The Departmental Honors Program i nvol ves a long term (three semester) independent research project undertaken with a faculty advisor. Students register for BSCI 378H( research) and 
BSCI379H (seminar) each semester. Admission is based upon GPA. Students must arrange the research opportunity prior to application. Please contact the Cell Biology and Molecular 
Genetics U ndergraduate Off i ce for more i nformation or see the site http://www.cbmg.urrti.edL^urxlergraduate/researchopportuni rj es 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

All students interested in microbiology are encouraged to join the University of Maryland Student Chapter of the American Society for Microbiology. Sigma Alpha Omicron is the honors 
chapter of this group. The groups meet regularly on campus. I nformation is avail able through the Undergraduate ProgramOffice 

Awards and Recognition 

The department recognizes graduati ng seniors with awards funded by generous donors. These are I i sted at bap tfrBmidmaimlBijSdriaEM p=-»hs 

Central European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERE) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2106J irrenez Hall, 301-405-4244 

www.ceres.urrri.edu 

crnarti n@umd.edu 

Director: C. Martin 

Professors: J . Herf.J. Lampe S. Mansbach, P. Murrell.J. Robinson, V.Tismaneanu 

Associate Professors: D. Hitchcock.J . Kaminski, M. Lekic, C. Martin, E. Papazian, C. Schuler 

Assistant Professors: E. Adler (Visit Asst Prof), M . Landa (Asst Prof) 

The Major 

The CERES program fosters in-depth knowledge of the region stretching from Prague in the West to Vladivostok in the East This includes three main areas: Central and Eastern Europe 
Russia, and Eurasia (the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union). Our majors prepare for careers and graduate programs in which an in-depth knowledge of Russia, Central 
Europe, and Eurasia can be applied with great benefit, such as journal ism government service diplomacy, business, a variety of professional schools, andM.A. and Ph.D. programs i n the 
humanities and social sciences. Our majors take courses in a range of different departments, gaining a firm grounding in the languages, literatures, history, politics, and economics of their 
area of study. They have the flexibility to do coursework in other fields related to the area as well. Students learn to examine our area of study with the tools of many scholarly fiddsCourses 
that cmrttoward this rrajor may befound under thefollowing acronyms: ARTH.ECON.GEOG, GERM, GVPT, HIST, PHIL, RUSS, SOCY.THET. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Having completed the multi-disciplinary degree program, students are expected to attain the foil owing I earning outcomes: 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate 
effectively in writing in either Russian, German, or a Central/East European language (including Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian, Bulgarian, and Romanian); or in a 
Eurasian language (i.e, a language from a country formerly part of the Soviet Union). 2. Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct research using primary and secondary sources 
including archival, pri nt and non-pri rt, and web-based texts. 3. Students will demonstrate understanding of and sensitivity to cultural diversity by studying a variety of cultures and 
societies within the CERE region. 

Admission to the Major 

Admi ssi on i s open to al I i nterested students but shod d be approved i n a meeti ng wi th the Di rector. 

Placement in Courses 

Placement in language courses is determined by the advisor for a given language Before you enrol I in a Russian or German I anguagecl ass, you must take the on-line "Foreign Language 
Placement Test': http://www.anhu.umd.edL^siteVdefault/files/aitiu/uridergraduate/pdf/FLPT_ONLINE.^ However, fi nal placement into the correct level will be determined by the advisor 
for the language you wish to study. 

Requirements for the Major 

Requirements for the CERES major includetheCollegeof Arts and Humanities's mandated completion of 45 upper-level credits. TheCollege's Global Engagement Requirement will be 
automatically fulfilled in the process of fulfilling the CERES requirement of taking ether Russian, German, or a Central/East European language (including Czech, Polish, Hungarian, 
Serbian and Croatian, Bulgarian, and Romanian).The language requirement may also be fulfilled by a Eurasian language (i.e, a language from a country formerly part of the Soviet Union). 
Those interested in fulfil I ingtheCERES language requirement through a Central /East European or Eurasian language should consult the director upon entering the program 
Students who el ect the Russi an I anguage track must complete a mi ni mum of 24 credit hours i n Russi an language and literature selected from among the following courses (or their 
equivalents): 

Crafts 

RUSS101 Intensive Elementary Russian I 6 

RUSS102 Intensive Elementary Russian II 6 

R U SS201 I ntermedi ate Russi an I 5 

R U SS202 I ntermedi ate Russi an 1 1 5 

RUSS301 Advanced Russian I 3 

RUSS302 Advanced Russian II 3 

RUSS303 Russian Conversation: Functional Skills 3 

RUSS321 Survey of Russian Literature I 3 

RUSS322 Survey of Russian Literature 1 1 3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 244 



RUSS401 Advanced Russian Composition 3 

RUSS402 Practicum in Written Russian 3 

RUSS403 Russian Conversation: Advanced Skills 3 

RUISS404 Practicum in Spoken Russian 3 

Students interested in sped alizi ng primarily on Central/Eastern Europe may opt for the German language track, and must complete a mini mum of 24 credit hours in the Department of 
Germani c Studi es from anting the f ol I owi ng courses (or the; r equi val ents) : 

Crafts 

GERM103 I ntersive Elementary German 4 

GERM203 IntensivelntermadiateGerman 4 

GERM301 Conversation and Composition I 3 

GERM302 Conversation and Composition II 3 

• Also accepted will be 16 credit hours of Russian or German and the equivalent of 8 credit hours of a Central /East European language 

• Fulfilling the language requirement through a Eurasian language will be decided on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the director. 

• I n addition to language courses, students must complete 24 hours of CERES approved courses at the 300-level or above These 24 hours must betaken i n at least four different 
departments (with the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures counting as a single department), and may include language-literature courses beyond the required 24 hours. Of 
the 24 hours, at least 9 hours must be in courses with substantial or specific focus on Central/East Europe (for exarrple, ARTH 350 or 48SC, GVPT359, 409, HIST 319, 340, 443 and 
other special courses offered intheCERES area withthe approval of the director) and at least 9 hours must be inthoseCERES courses with substantial or specific Russian/Eurasian 
fccusffar exarrple GEOG325, GVPT445, 451, 459A, 481, HIST 344, 424, 425, 442, SOCY474, THET499, and other special courses offered in the CERES area with the approval 
of the director). 

Forafull listing of this year's CERES courses, seethewebsitewww.ceres.urrd.edu, and click on "requirements." 

The various cooperating departments also offer special (i.e non-permanent) seninars and courses in the Russian, EastEuropean, and Eurasian fields. HIST 237-Russian Civilization is 

recommended as a general i ntroducti on to the program but does not count toward the f ulf i 1 1 ment of the program's requi rerrents. 

N o course grade below the grade of C- may count toward the major. An overall GPA of 2.0 in the major is requi red for graduation. 

Advising 

Course sel ecti on and progress toward programmati c requi rerrents are to be di scussed i ndi vi dual I y through meeti ngs with the CERES director. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Students are encouraged to pursue research, internship and study abroad experiences. Such opportunities should be discussed individually with the Director. 

Internships 

Students are encouraged to seek off-campus internships that may be available in the greater DC- Baltimore area. Earning academic credit for such experiences should be discussed 
i ndi vi dual I y wi th the D i rector. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

CERES majors are el igi Hefor norri nation to national honor societies related to the; r studies. 

Certificate Programs (Undergraduate) 

Certificate Program I nfbrmation and Requirements 

African American Studies C ertificate 

2169 LeFrak Hall, 301-405-1158 
www.bsos.urrcl.edu/aasp 
vskeeter@aasp. urrd.edu 

The Certi fi cate i n Afri can A meri can Studi es offers undergraduate students an excel I erf opportonity to clevd op a special izati on inAfricarhArreri cm issues while pursuing a major in another 

field. Certificate students learn about the social, economic, political and cultural history of the Afri can-American people through a concentration of courses they plan with the AASD 

Academic Advisor. Courses taken toward the certificate also may be used to satisfy core requirements and electi ves. 

E ami ng a Certi f i cate i n Af ri can A meri can Studi es gi ves students a competi ti ve advantage i n the j ob market by adding greater focus to their undergraduate experience 

RequirernentsfortheCertificate 

. 9 hours of AASP core courses: AASP 100, AASP 101, and A ASP 200 or AASP 202. 

• 9 hours of upper division dectives in AASP (300 level or above); courses i n other departments must be pre-approved. 

• 3 credit semi nar: AASP 400 or AASP 402. 

• Students must earn a "C-" or above in each course applied toward the certificate 

• Students must have a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy the undergraduate certificate requirements. 

• No more than 9 credit hours applied towards a major may be counted for the certificate. 

• No more than 9 credit hours may be taken at i nsti tuti ons other than U M C P. 

For more information, or to apply, please call the African American Studies Department at 405-1158. The AASD office is located in 2169 LeFrak Hall. 
Asian American Studies Program 

Office of Undergraduate Studies 

1145 ColeStudent Activities Building, 301-405-0996 

www.aasturrd.edu 

aast@urrd.edu 

The Certificate in Asian American Studies involves students in critical study of the experiences of Asian Americans. Through an intedisciplinary approach, students examine the hi stories, 
communities, and cultures of Asian Americans as both distinctive from and connected to the broader themes for di versity, ethnicity, race gender and migration in the Americas 

Requirements for Certificate: 

The Certificate in Asian American Studies requi res at least 21 credits: 6 credits in core courses (AAST200 and A A ST201); 12 credits in elective courses (from among AAST offerings or, 
with program approval, from among courses offered outside AAST); and a capstone course of 3 credits (AAST378 or AAST388). Students must earn a grade of C- or better in any course 
that counts toward the Certif i cate i n Asi an A meri can Studi es. 

Note The Certificate in Asian American Studies was suspended beginnning fall 2009. The Asian American Studies Program currently offers a 15-credit academic minor; see Chapter 6 for 
detai Is on the Asian American Studies M i nor. 

ComputHtional Science 

College of Compute', Mathematical, and Natural Sciences 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 245 



3103 M athematics Bui Idi ng, 301-405-0924 
www.amsc.urrcl.eclu 

For program requiremertsseeCertJficateinConputational Science inttie section on A ppliedMathematics& Statistics, and Scientific Computation. 
East Asian Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2111 Taliaferro Hall, 301-405-4319 

http://www.ceas.urrd.edu/Certificate/index.html 

jzgao@urrd.edu 

The UndergraduateCertificate in East Asian Studies is a 24-credit course of instixiction ofesigned to provide speciEilized knowledge of thecultures, histories, and contemporary concerns of 
the peoples of China, J apan, and Korea I twill compl errent and enrich a students major. The curriculum focuses on language instruction, civilization courses, and electives in several 
departments and programs of the university. It is designed specifically for students who wish to expand their knowledge of East Asia and demonstrate to prospective employers, the public, 
and graduate and professional schools a special competence and set of skills in East Asian affairs. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the courses, with a grade of C- or better in each course, and recommendation by the Coordinator of theCertificate Program a certificate will be awarded. 
Begining with Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have a minimum C (2.0) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy undergraduate 
certificate requirements. A notation of the award of the certificate will be included on the student's transcript. The student must have a bachelor's degree awarded by Maryland (must be 
C ol I ege Park campus) previ ous to or si mul taneousl y wi th an award of the certi f i cate 

CareValuesofiheProcyam 

Vision: See the U.S. arxJ East Asia as parts of one globalized world with cultural varieties. 

K nowl edge A cqui re I anguage ski 1 1 s, spati al and chronol ogi cal thi nki ng ski 1 1 s, and creati ve prowess through i nterdi sci pi i nary study. 

Integrity: adhere to theUniversity& Code of Academiclntegrity and professional ethics. 

TheCertificate will equip students to develop successful careers through teachi ng excel I enceand study abroad programs. 
Certificate Requirements 
The student i s requi red to take: 

1. HIST 284 EastAsianCivilizatJonl 

2. HIST 285 East AsianCivilization II 

3. Six semester hours of i ntroduction to one of thefol lowi ng East Asian languages (Chi nese, J apanese, or Korean): 

CHIN 101 Elementary Chi nesel 

JAPN 101 ElementaryJ apanese I 

KORA 101 Elementary Korean I 

KORA 102 Elementary Korean 1 1 

KORA 211 1 ntroductory Reading for Speakers of Korean I 

KORA 212 1 ntroductory Reading for Speakers of Korean 1 1 

Students with I anguage competence equi val ent to these I anguage courses are exempted from the I anguage requi rement: such students are requi red to compl ete an addi ti onal si x hours of 
dectivesinEastAsiancoursestofulfill the24-creditrequirementforthecertificate 

Electives: Students must compl ete at least 12 hours of electives selected from four regular approved courses on East Asia in such disciplines as: 

1. art history 

2. busi ness 

3. ethnomusi oology 

4. government and pol i ti cs 

5. history 

6. language linguistics, and literature 

7. music 

8. plant science andlandscape architecture 

9. sociology and 
10. women's studies. 

An overall GPA of 2.0inthecertificateis requi red for graduation. 

Nineof the 12 hours of electives must be upper division (300-400 level courses). A maximum of three credit hours of special topics courses on EastAsiawill be all owed with the approval 
of thecertificatecoordinator. No more than nine credits from any one department or from the students major may be applied toward the certificate In addition, no rrore than nine credits of 
the courses applied toward the certificate may be transferred from other institutions. Students are asked to work wi th the coordinator in ensuring that the electives maintain an intercollegiate 
and i nterdi sci pi i nary focus (at I east three disciplines are recommended). I nterested students shoul d contact the Coordi nator of the Certif i cate Program Dr. J ames Z. Gao, Department of 
History, 2111 Taliaferro Hall, izqaoOurrd.edu (web6iteat www.ceas.urrd.edu ). 

I nternational Acjicultureand Natural Resources 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources 

0108 Syrmns Hall, 301-405-2078 
www.agnr.urrd.edu 

The Certif i cate in I nternational Agriculture and Natural Resources is designed to enrich a students major with a global perspective The requi red courses focus on: language i nstruction; 
international aspects of the environment, agricultural production, devdopmentandsustainability, nutrition, and business: an experience abroad: and a capstone course regardi ng the 
students travel abroad. Any student in good academic standing may participate in the certificate program 

Requirements for Certificate 

The certi f i cate requi res at I east 21 credi ts that may i ncl ude courses taken toward other degree and general educati on requi rements. U pon successful compl eti on of the courses, wi th a grade 
of C- or better in each course and a recommendation of the Associate Dean of the Collegeof Agricultureand Natural Resources, a certificate will be awarded. A notation of the award of 
the certificate will be included on the students transcript Inordertorecavethecertificate students must havecompleted all requi rerrents for a bachelor's degree Beginning with students 
matriculating in Fall 2012, to be awarded a baccalaureate degree, students must have a mini mum C (2.0) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to statify undergraduate 
certif i cate requi rements. 

Foreign Language 

6-8 credits in a foreign language 

I nternational Courses 

At least 9 credits fromthe following list of courses, at least 3 of these courses must be in the Col I ege of Agriculture and Natural Resources for students not majoring in a program outside of 
theCollegeof Agricultureand Natural Resources: 

ENST 100 1 nternational Crop Production 

ENST440Crops, Soils, and Civilization 

AREC 365 World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies 

AREC 433 Food and Agricultural Policy 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 246 



BMGT 392 Introduction to International Business Management 

BMGT 390 Competing on Quality inaGlobal Economy 

BSCI 365 International Pesticide Problems and Solutions 

GEOG 434 Agriculture and Rural Development 

NFSC 425 International Nutrition 

AREC 445Agricultural Development, Population Growth, and the Environment 

ECON 440 International Economics 

GVPT306Global Ecopolitics 

GEOG 422 Population Geography 

Travel Study or Travel Abroad 

Three to four credits of travel study or study abroad. Prerequisite to have completed the foreign language course work. Prerequisite or co-requisite: six credits from the International 
Courses List Inordertoqualifyforthecertificate, travel study and study abroad experiences require prior approval of Associate Dean of theCollege of Agricultureand Natural Resources. 
For approval, travel experiericernustdermnstratesignificantlearningopportunirjesinareas related to agriculture and natural resources and cultural immersion. 

Travel Study Seminar 

1 credit Travel Study Seminar. Prerequisite completion of the travel study requirement 

This course will require student presentation of their travel experience including a paper, a poster presentation, as well as an oral presentation and discussion. 
Latin American Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3107 Taliaferro Hall, 301-405-8961 

www.lasc.urrd.edu 

lasc@urrd.edu 

The interdisciplinary certificate program in Latin American Studies is open to University of Maryland, College Park undergraduates in any major who are interested in global studies and 
Latin America. The undergraduateCertificate in Latin American Studies will be awarded to students who have completed 21 credits with a grade of C- or better in the foil owing areas. 

Requirements for Certificate 

A. Corecurriculumfor all certificate students (12 credits) 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 234 Issues in Latin A m=ri can Studies I 

LASC/SPAN/PORT 235 Issues in Latin A m=ri can Studies II 

HIST 250orHIST 251 Latin American History I orll 

LASC/SPAN/PORT/ANTH 458 Senior capstone course in Latin American Studies 

B. Additional courses in Latin American Studies (9 credits) 

Nine credits are additional courses that must be chosen from an approved I istand from at I east two different depanireits. At least six credits must be at the 300- or 400-levd. See Latin 
A men can Studi es advi sor f or detai I s. 

C. Foreign Language Competency All certificate srixtertenx^clerranstratetharcorrpetence in one of the languages of LatinAmericaandtheCaribbean, including Spanish, Portuguese 
or French. Other languages may be used to fufi 1 1 this goal with the permission of the LA SC undergraduate advi sor. Competency may be proven with a grade of C- or better in an 
intermediate-levd course or higher. Native speakers of Spanish or Portuguese or students with extensive experience in these languages should consult with the Latin American Studies 
advisor. 

An overall GPA of 2.0inthecerrjficateis required for graduation. 

Interested students should contact our advi sor, Dr. lvetteRodriguez-Santanaatrivette@urrd.edu, 301-405-8961, orLASC at lasc@urrd.edu or 301-405-6459. Pleasevisitourwebpageat 
www.lasc.urrd.edu 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT) 

2417 MarieMountHall, 301-405-5428 

www.lgbts.umd.edu 

lgbts@urrd.edu 

The program in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (LGBT) offers an i nterdi sci pi i nary undergraduate certificate and a minor designed to examine the lives, experiences, 
identities and representations of LGBT persons, those who are today described as having a minority sexual orientation or who are gender transgressive 

For more information, see the Office of Undergraduate Studies in Chapter 6. 

Science^ Technology and Society Certificate 

1125 Cumberland Hall, 301-405-0527 
www.sts.urrd.edu 
Director, Betsy Mendelsohn - bmandd@urrd.edu 

The undergraduate University Certificate program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) enables students to I earn about the dynamic, interactive and creative rdationships among 
sci ence, technol ogy, and soci ety. I n addi ti on to coursework, the STS program requi res students to attend monthl y, STS-rd ated events on campus, whi ch are I i sted on the program websi te 
Students are invited to partici pate infidd trips to research labs and in service activities rdated to STS; these activities build community among students, staff and faculty. Each student 
works closdy with a faculty mentor when writing the capstone term paper in the senior EN ES 440 seminar. The STS University Certificate is especial ly hdpful to students who wish to 
i mpose a unifyi ng theme on thei r dective courses. 

Courses rd evant to the STS program are drawn from many departments; thi s demonstrates the currency of sci ence and technol ogy studi es across di sci pi i nes i n the sci ences, engi neeri ng, the 
humanities, and social sciences. STS is an interdisciplinary field that has been taught for more than 30 years at universities in the United States and Europe, notably in those with strong 
engineering and public policy programs. I n recent years, STS University Certificate students have chosen to write thdr capstone term papers about timdy topics, including the interactions 
among sci ence technol ogy and soci ety rd ated to nanotechnol ogy, f ud cd I appl i cati ons, physi cs research fundi ng, cl i mate change modd i ng, rd i gi ous pri nci pi es as a basi s for cl i mate 
action, integration of SONAR into underwater vehicles, nuclear power in developing countries, and interpersonal impacts of social networking. 

Courses: 

The STS program requi res 9 credits of Lower Levd and 12 credits of Upper Levd courses. Students must obtain pri or approval of the director before counting courses toward thdr 
individualized STS curriculum Many of these credits may overlap with major and minor requi rerrents. For guidance, see the website for a list of approved courses, and note that students 
may ask the di rector to approve a course not I i sted on the website 

Lower Levd (ICO- and20D-lejfi) Courses (9 credts): 

• Two courses that rd ate sci ence to soci ety, technol ogy to soci ety, or sci ence to technol ogy; one shoul d be a survey course with broad temporal or subj ect content 

• The STS sophomore survey course, CPSP227 

Upper Lad (300- and4C0-level) Courses (12 credts): 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 247 



These courses have an interdisciplinary orientation that demonstrates inter-rel ad onships between science and society, between technology and society, or between science and technology. 
Students choose three courses and the fourth course i s E N E S440, the STS U ni versity Certifi cate capstone 

Joining the Program and Program Requirements 

Students i nterested i n STS shoul d contact the di rector to obtai n advi ce and approval pri or to enrol I i ng i n courses that f ul f i 1 1 the program Students record thei r progress wi th the STS program 
office as they complete requirements, participate in a semi-annual advising meeting, and writea brief evaluation upon completing the program Students must earn a mini mum grade of C- 
in each course they wish to credit toward the STS University Certificate A students individual course of study may not exceed these maximums: 9 credits of courses applied to the students 
major; 3 credits of Special or Selected Topics courses; 9 credits of courses taken outside UMCP; and 6 credits of courses with the AREC, ECON and GVPT prefixes. Once all requirements 
are met and the di rector affi rms that the student has compl eted the program the Regi strarirrludes a notation of this University Certifi cate on the students transcript 

Upper Division Certificatein Secondary Education 

College of Education 

2311 Benjarrin Building, 301-405-3324 
www.educati on.urrd.edu/E DCI 

The Certificate Program in Secondary Education is currently under review. Please see an advisor in TLPL for more information on this pathway and other pathways to certification. 



Women' s Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2101 Woods Hall, 301-405-6877 
www.womensstudi es. urrd.edu 
womensstudi es@urrd.edu 

See Women's Studi es Department for f acul ty roster. 

The Women's Studies Certificate Program consists of an integrated, i nterdisci pi i nary curriculum on women that is designed to supplement a students major. Any student in good standing 
may enrol I i n the certj f i cate program by decl ari ng her/hi s i ntenti on to the Women's Studi es U ndergraduate A dvi sor. For addi ti onal i nf ormati on contact the Women's Studi es off i ce 
301-405-6827. 

Requirements for Certificate 

To qualify for a certificate in Women's Studies, a student will be required to earn 21 credits in Women's Studies courses, nine of which must be at the 300/400 level. No more than three 
credit hours of special topics courses may be counted toward the certifi cate No more than nine credits which are applied toward a major may be included in thecertificate program No more 
than nine credit hours may be taken at institutions other than the University of Maryland. Each student must obtai n a grade of C- or better in each course that is to be counted toward the 
certificate An overall GPA of 2.0 in thecertificate is required for graduation. Of the 21 credits, courses must be distributed as follows: 

L Requirements for thecertificate 



WMST200 
WMST250 
WMST400 
WMST488 



Foundation Courses (9 crecft hours) 

Introduction to Women's Studies: Woman and Society, OR 
Introduction to Women's Studies: Woman, Art& Culture 
Theories of Feminism 
Senior Seminar 



2 DistributiveCourses 

WMST241 
WMST250 
WMST255 
WMST275 
WMST281 
WMST348 
WMST408 
WMST444 
WMST448 
WMST458 
WMST466 
WMST468 
WMST481 
WMST496 
FREN482 



Area I: ArtsandLiterature(3 crecft hours) 

Woman Writers of French Expression in Translation (X-listed as FREN241) 

I ntroducti on to Women's Studi es: Woman, A it, and C ul ture 

Introduction to Literature by Women (X-listed as ENGL255) 

World Literature by Woman (X-listed asCM LT 275) 

Woman in German Literature and Society (X-listed as GERM 281) 

Literary Works by Women (x-listed as ENGL348) 

Special Topics in Literature by Women before 1800 (X-listed as ENGL 408) 

Feminist Critical Theory (X-listed as ENGL 444) 

Special Topics i n Literature by Women of Color* (X-listed as ENGL448) 

Special Topics i n Literature by Women after 1800 (X-l isted as ENGL458) 

Ferrini st Perspective on Women in Art (X-listed as ARTH466) 

Feminist Cultural Studies 

Femmas Fatal es and the Representation of Violence in Literature(X-listed as FREN481) 

African -American Women Filmmakers* (X-listed as THET 496) 

Gender and Ethnicity in Modem French Literature 



WMST210 

WMST211 

WMST212 

WMST320 

WMST453 

WMST454 

WMST455 

WMST456 

WMST457 

AASP498W 

AMST418J 

HIST309 



Area II: Historical Perspectives (3 crecft hours) 

Woman i n A meri ca to 1880(X -I i sted as H I ST 210) 

Woman in America Si nee 1880 (X-listed as HIST 211) 

Woman i n Western E urope 1750- present (X - 1 i sted as H I ST212) 

Woman in Classical Antiquity (X-listed asCLAS 320) 

Victorian Women in England, France, and the United States (X-listed as HIST 493) 

Woman in Africa* (X-listed as HIST 494) 

Woman in Medieval Culture and Society (X-listed as HIST495) 

Woman in the Middle East* 

Changing Perceptions of Gender in theUS: 1880-1935 (X-listed as HIST 433) 

Black Women in United States Hi story* 

Woman and Family in Amari can Life 

Proserrinar in Historical Writing: Women's History 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 248 



Arealll: Social and Natural Sciences (3 credit hairs) 

WMST200 I rtroducti on to Women's Studies: Women and Society 

WMST313 Worren and Science (X-listed as BSCI 313) 

WMST324 CommunicationandGender(x-listedasCOMM 324) 

WMST325 SociologyofGender(X-listedasSOCY 325) 

WMST326 Biology of Reproduction (X-listed as BSCI 342) 

WMST336 Psychology of Women (X-listed as PSYC 366) 

WMST360 Caribbean Women* 

WM ST410 Women i n the Af ri can Di aspora* 

WMST420 AsiarvArrericanWomen* 

WMST425 Gender Roles and Social Institutions 

WMST430 Gender Issuesin Families (X-listed as FMST 430) 

WMST436 Legal Statusof Wom=n(X-listedasGVPT 436) 

WMST452 Women andtheMedia(X-listedasJOUR 452) 

WMST471 Women's Health (X-listed as HLTH 471) 

WMST493 Jewish Women in International Perspective* 

WMST494 Lesbian Communities and Difference* 

AASP498F Special Topics i n Black Culture Women and Work* 

CCJS498 Special Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice: Women and Crime 

SOCY498W 

Special Topics in Sociology: Women in the Military 



♦Fulfil Is Women's Studies Multi-Cultural Requirement 
3. Courses in C ultural Diversity (6 credit hours) 

Students will select one course for a mini mum of 3 credit hours. Approved courses are noted with an asterisk in section 2, above. 

Courses i n this category may overlap with other requirements. 

4 Remaining Courses 

The remai ni ng courses may be chosen from any of the three di stri buti ve areas or from among any of the WM ST courses i ncluding 

WMST 298 or 498: Special Topics and WMST 499: 1 independent Study. 

Advising 

To obtain mare information, contact the Undergraduate Advisor, 301-405-6827, or write to the Women's Studies Department, 

2101 Woods Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

Course Code WMST 



CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING (CHBE) 

A. J ames Clark School of Engineering 

2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, 301-405-1935 

www.chbeurrd.edu 

Chair: S. Ehrman 

Professors: R. Adomaitis, M. Anisirmv, R. Calabrese K. Choi, E. Wachsman, W. Weigand 

Associate Professors: P. Dirritrakopoulos, S. Raghavan, N. Wang 

Assistant Professors: J . Klauda (Asst Prof), D.Liu (Asst Prof), G. Sriram(Asst Prof), C. Wang (Asst Prof) 

Affiliate Professors: M. Al-Sheikhly (Affil Prof, Prof), W. Bentiey (Prof, Affiliate Prof), D. DeVoe(Prof, Affiliate Prof), G.Jackson (Prof, Affiliate Prof), P. Kofinas (Prof, Affiliate Prof), 

M. Zachariah (Prof, Affiliate Prof) 

Affiliate Associate Professors: J. Fisher (Assoc Prof, Affil Assoc Prof), S. Lee (Assoc Prof, Affil Assoc Prof) 

Affi Nate Assistant Professors: J . Seog (Asst Prof, Aff Asst Prof) 

Adjunct Professors: M . Klapa, J . Quackenbush, M . Ranade (Adjunct Prof), A. Yang 

Professors Emeriti: J. Gentry (Prof Emeritus), S. Greer (Affiliate Prof, Prof Emerita), T. McAvoy, T. Regan, J. Sengers, T. Smith (Prof Emeritus) 

The Major 

Students in the Department of Chemical and Biormlecular Engineering at the University of Maryland learn to use a combi nation of mathematical, physical, chemical, and biological 

science concepts within a rigorous engineering design framework, graduating with a unique set of ski I Is highly valued by a wide range of employers in industry, academia, and the 

government The wi de breadth of thi s prof essi on and the Departments uni que strengths i n nanotechnol ogy and bi otechnol ogy prepare our students for outstaridi ng careers. 

Because of the wide range of ultimate applications, the chemical engineer finds interesting and diverse career opportunities in such varied fields as chemical (inorganic and organic), food 

process! ng and manufacturi ng, metallurgical, polymer, energy conversion, environmental engineering, petroleum (refining, production, or petrochemical), and pharmaceutical industries. 

Additional opportunities arepresented by the research and development activities of many publicand private researchinstitutes and all government agencies. Our graduates have taken jobs 

with companies like DuPont, ExxonMobil, Proctor & Gamble the Food and Drug Administration, and the Department of Defense 

On top of all the options and opportunities, chemical and biormlecular engineers have traditionally ranked at or near the top of starting salaries among all of the engineering professions! 

Cour5esofferedbythisdepartmentrr^befourxJurrierthefollowingacronyms: ENCH & CHBE 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical and Biormlecular Engineeri ng is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org. Ill Market Place Suite 

1050, Baltimore MD 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700. 

Program Objectives 

• Graduates with a solid foundation in chemical engineering science fundamentals as well as a broad background in science and mathematics to equip them to enter professional and 
chemical engineering practice and to enter graduate study at leading universities. 

• Graduates who will excel intraditional chemical engineeri rig careers and diverse careers in areas such as biotechnology, nanotechnol ogy, medicine I aw or business. 

• Graduates who are equipped with sol id quantitative problem solving, teamwork, communication ski I Is, adaptability to new technologies and a strong ethical foundation that will serve 
them throughout the r careers. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Students are expected to fully engage with the curriculum and the opportunities presented for leami ng and research. Having completed the degree program, students should have acquired 
the f ol I owi ng knowl edge and ski 1 1 s: 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 249 



• An ability to apply knowledge of chemical engineeringfundarnantalsto identify and solve chemical engineering problems. 

• An ability to identify and solve problems in specialized areas related to chemical engineering. 

• An ability to apply mathematics relevant to engineering and the physical and chemical sciences to identify and solve technical problems. 

• A broad knowledge necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context 

• An ability to identify engineering problems and propose appropriate solutions. 

• A n abi I ity to pert orm step-by-step desi gn of engi neered systems and chemi cal processes. 

• An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 

• The knowl edge of computers and i nformati on technol ogy necessary to f unctj on eff ectj vd y as chemi cal engi neers 

• An awareness of safety and envi ronrrental i ssues as an i ntegral part of the chemi cal engi neeri ng prof essi on. 

• A n abi I i ty to successful I y parti ci pate i n teams. 

• An abi I ity to communicate effectively through oral presentations and written reports. 

• An understand ng of prof essi onal and ethi cal responsi bilities 

• Ski 1 1 s necessary for empl oyrrent i n a vari ety of posi tj ons i n i ndustry or government or for conti nued study i n graduate or prof essi onal school s. 

• An understand ng of current technol ogi cal i ssues rel ated to cherri cal engi neeri ng. 

• A n abi I ity to engage i n structured research. 

• An appreciation for excellence and diversity. 

• An abi I ity and the motivation to engage i n I ife-long leami ng, and the abi I ity to conduct research usi ng resources beyond the undergraduate curriculum 

Requirements for the Major 

IMPORTAI^iThissecrjon contains requirementsforinconing freshman or transfer students entering the B.S. program in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Fall 2010andlater. 

For students enteri ng the program before Fal I 201 0see requi rements here. 

The undergraduate program is designed to be completed in tour years. It is i mportant to fol low the sample program as closely as possi He, as nearly al I CHBE classes areoffered only once a 

year. All Chemical and B iorrDlecularEngi neeri ng students must parti ci pate in an advi si ng session prior to registering each semester. Students are assigned a faculty advisor at the start of 

their first semester in the major. Questions aboutthe undergraduate program may be sent to Kathy Lopresti atloprestj@umd.edu. 

Coures appearing in bold areoffered by the Department of Chemical arid Biormlecular Engineering. 

Freshmen Year: Fall satiate 



Course 




Credts 


ENES100 


1 ntroducti on to E ngi neeri ng Desi gn 


3 


MATH 140 


Calculus 1 


4 


CHEM135 


General Chemistry for Engi neers 


3 


CHEM136 


General Chemistry for Engineers Laboratory 


1 




General Education 


3 


Total Credit 




14 



Freshmen Year: Spring 



Course 

ENGL101 
MATH141 

PHYS161 

BIOE120 

CHBE 101 

Total Credits 



I ntroducti on to Writi ng 

Calculus 1 1 

General Physics: Mechanics and Particle 
Dynamics 

B i ol ogy for E ngi neers 

Introduction to Chemistry & Biomolecular 
Engineering 



Credts 

3 

4 

3 
3 
3 
16 



Sophomore Year: Fall sanesba 



Course 




Credits 


MATH241 


Calculus II 1 


4 


PHYS260 


General Physics II 


3 


PHYS261 


General Physics II Laboratory 


1 


CHEM231 


Organic Chemistry 1 


3 


CHEM232 


Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 


1 


CHBE301 


Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 
Thermodynamics 1 


3 




General Education 


3 


Total Credits 




18 



Sophomore Year: Spring semester 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 250 



Course Credits 



MATH246 Differential Equations for Scientists and 3 

Engineers 



PHYS270 General Physics II I 3 

PHYS271 General Physics II I Laboratory 1 

CHEM241 Organic Chemistry II 3 

CHEM242 Oraganic Chemistry 1 1 Laboratory 1 



runc-jwi Conputer Methods in Chemical 
CHBE25 ° Engineering 



rugExn Chemical and Biomdecular Engineering 
CHBE3Q2 Thermodyna|ri(s || 



Total 
Credits 



17 



J unior Year: Fall Semester 



Course 
CHBE410 

CHBE422 

CHBE440 

CHEM272 
ENGL393 

Total Credits 



Statistics and Experimental Design 

Chemical and Biomolecular Transport 
Phenomenal 

Chemical Kinetics& Reactor Design 

General Bioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory 
Technical Writing 
General Education 



Crecft 

3 



3 
2 
3 
3 
17 



J unior Year: Spring Semester 



Course 

BCHM461or Biochemistry I or 

BCHM463 Biochemistry of Physiology 

ENMA300or Intro to Materials and Their Applications or 

ENMA425or Introduction to Biomaterials or 

BIOE453 Biomaterials 



Chemical and Biomolecular Transport 
Phenomenall 

CHBE426 Chemical and Biomolecular Separation 



CHBE424 



CHBE333 Communication Skillsfor Engineers 

General Education 
Total Credits 



Crecft 

3 



1 
3 

16 



Senior Year: Fall Semester 

Course Crecft 

r-ua^/i-r, Chemical & Biomolecular , 

CHBE437 Engineering Lab 3 

CHBE442 Chemical & Biomolecular Systems AiuJysis 3 

CHBE444 Process Engineering Economicsand Design I 3 

TECH ELECT Technical Elective* 3 

General Education 3 

Total Credits 15 

Senior Year: Spring Semester 



Course Credits 

CHBE446 Process Engineering Economics& Design II 3 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 251 



TECH 

ELECT 

TECH 
ELECT 



Technical Elective* 



Technical Elective* 



General Education 3 

General Education 3 

Total Credits 15 

Technical Elective list of approved courses www.chbeunxl.edu/undergrad/fall2010/electives-fl0forward.htrnl 

Decree Credits: 128 credits and fulfillment of all departmental, college, and university requirements with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0. 



Other Requirements for the Major 

IMPORTANT: Changes have been made to our undergraduate Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering curriculum that will take effect in Fall 2010. These changes only apply to new, 

incorri ng freshmen or transfer students entering our program in Fall 2010andLATER. If youenteredourprograminSpring2010orEARLIER,youwill not be affected. 

Program requi rerrents for students enteri ng before Fall 2010 (Spring 2010 or EARL I E R) can be found at www.chbe urrd.edu/undergrad/prefal 1 2010/requi rements-pref al 1 2010. html 

Advising 

All students choosing Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering as thei r primary field must see their assigned undergraduate advisor each semester. Please contact Kathy Lopresti at 
301-405-5888 or I opresti @umd.edu for your assi gned advi sor i nformati on. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

A unique aspect of the Departments undergraduate program is its high level of students participation in cutting-edge research. Approximately half of our students graduate with significant 
I ab experi ence and most fi nd i t to be one of the hi gh poi nts of the; r undergraduate educati on. 

Honors Program 

The A. James Clark School of Engineering hosts a chapter of theOmega Chi E ceil on National Honor Society for chemical engineering, as well as a chapter of the engineering honor 
society, Tau Beta Pi. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Students operate a campus student chapter of the professional organization, theAmericanlnstituteof Chemical Engineers. Omega Chi E pi si I on is the honorary Chemical Engineering 
Society 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Financial aid based upon need is avail able through the Office of Student Financial Aid. A number of scholarships are avail able through the A. James CI ark School of Engineering. The 
department offers opportuni ti es f or research and other part-ti me empl oyment. 

Awards and Recognition 

Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship and outstanding service to the Department, College and University. These awards include the David Arthur Berman Memorial Award, the 
Russell Barch Memorial Award, and several American Institute of Chemical Engineers(AICHE) awards. AICHE awards are given to the junior with the highest cumulativeGPA as well as 
totheoutstandingjuniorandoutstandingseniorinChemical Engineering. 



CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (CHEM, BCHM) 

College of Chemical and Life Sciences 

0107H Chem'stry Building, 301-405-1788 

www.chemurrd.edu 

Student I nformati on: 1206ChemBldg; 301-405-1791 

Chair: M. Doyle (Professor) 

Professors: M . Alexander, H. Ammon, D. Beckett, N. Blough, J . Davis, P. DeShong, B. Eichhorn, D. Falvey, C. Fenselau, J . Fourkas, D. Fushman, O. Herzberg, L. Isaacs, C. J arzynski, G. 

Lorimer, A. Mignerey, A. MullinJ. Ondov.J. Orban.J. Reutt-Robey, R. Salawitch, L.Sita, D. Thirumalai, W. Walters, J. Weeks, M.Zachariah 

Associ ate Professors: T. Dayie, D.Julin.J. Kahn, C. Lee, S. Lee,G. Papoian, H. Sintim, A. Vedernikov 

Assistant Professors: J. Edwards, N. LaRonde-LeBlanc, S. Li, Z. Nie, P. Paukstelis, V.Tugarinov, Y. Wang 

Lecturers: B. Dixon, L. Friedman, I. Kipnis, M. McDermott-Jones, M. Montague-Smith (Senior Lecturer), D. Steffek, E.Stone, B. Walters, J. Watson, N.White 

Affiliate Professors: M. Colombini, R. DickersonJ. Dinman, W. McDonough, E.Williams 

Adjunct Professors: J. Capala, P. Dagdigian, B. Gerratana, L. Locascio.J. Marino, E. Mazzola, L. Morss, S. Rokita 

Professors Emeriti: J. Bellama, A. Boyd, H. DeVoe, D. Freeman, S. Greer, S. Grim, J. Hansen, G. Hdz.J. Huheey, B.Jarvis, G. Miller, T. O'Haver.J.Tossell 

The Major 

The study of molecular and atomic properties and interactions that encompass Chemistry and Biochemistry are central to many scientific disciplines including biology, geology, astronomy, 
envi ronrrental sci ence materi al s sci ence and numerous others. C hemi stry and B i ochemi stry maj ors conti nue to graduate or prof essi onal school , and obtai n ernpl oyment as educators and 
technical scientists. Courses offered by this departrret may be found under the following acronyms: BCHM, CHEM 

Admission to the Major 

Chemistry and Biochemistry are part of a Limited Enrol I ment program (LEP) within the College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences (CM NS). Students must complete a 
series of gateway courses (CHEM 231/232, MATH 141, ENGL lOlandBSCI 105) prior to applying to the program I nformati on is avail able 
at: http://chernbio.urrri.edu/undergraduateprograrr^a^ 

Requirements for the Major 

Note The lower-level courses offered by the Department of C hemi stry andBiochemi stry changed starting in the Fall 2005serrester.Thelower-level requirements for chemistry and 
biochemistry maj ors are reflected in the requirements listed below. For details, contact the Undergraduate Office or visit the undergraduate section of the Departments website 

Chemistry Majors 

All requi red chemistry and biocheni stry courses must be passed with a mi ni mum grade of C-. Required supporting courses, including BSCI 105, must be passed with a 2.0 grade point 
average 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 252 



Required Courses 

CHEM146/147 Principles of General Chemistry/Lab 4 

CHEM237 Principles of Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM247 Principles of Organic Chemistry 1 1 4 
CHEM276/277 General Chemistry and Energetics! Majors)/ Lab 5 

rHFM ,„ Professi onal Issues in Chemistry and . 

Biochemistry 

CHEM425 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 4 

CHEM481/483 Physical Chemstry I / Lab 5 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing 3 

UNIV100 TheStudentintheUniversity 1 

Supporting Courses 

BSCI105 Principles of Biology I 4 

PHYS141/142 Principles of Physics 8 

MATH140 Calculusl 4 

MATH141 Calculusll 4 

NOTE: All rrajors and potential rrajors are encouraged to take 
MATH241-Calculuslll (4) prior tn beginning Physical Cheirisby. 

De par t m e n tal Requirements 

Lower level courses 16 

Supporting courses 20 

Upper level courses 24 

mist include 
CHEM401 Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHEM482/484 Physical Chemstry II /Lab 5 

ELECT UL approved upper level CHEM/BCHM courses 6 

I n order to meet requirements for a degree approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS), students must complete a specific set of courses in addition to this curriculum Information 
about ACS certification can beobtained in the undergraduate office 

Biochemistry Majors 

All required chemistry, biochemistry, and upper-level biological sci ences courses must be passed with a mini mum grade of C-. Required supporting courses, including BSCI 105, must be 
passed with a 2.0 grade poi nt average 

Crecfts 
Required Courses 

CHEM146/147 Principlesof General Chemistry/Lab 4 

CHEM237 Principles of Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM247 Principles of Organic Chemistry 1 1 4 

CHEM276/277 General Cherristryand Energetics- Majors/ Lab 5 

/-uc./i^ric Profess onal Issues in Chemistry and n 

CHEM395 BiochenistIy 1 

CHEM425 Instrumental Metnods of Analysis 4 

CHEM48V483 Physical Chemstry I / Lab 5 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing 3 

UNIV100 TheStudentintheUniversity 1 

Supporting Courses 

BSCI 105 Principlesof Biology I 4 

PHYS141/142 Principlesof Physics 8 

MATH140 Calculusl 4 

MATH141 Calculusll 4 

NOTE: All rrajors and potential rrajors are encouraged to take 
MATH241-Calculuslll (4) prior Id beginning Physical Cherristiy. 

De par t m e n tal Requirements 

Lower level courses 16 

Supporting courses 20 

Upper level courses 25 

mist include 
BCHM461 Biochemistry I 3 

BCHM462 Biochemistry 1 1 3 

BCHM464 Biochemistry Laboratory 3 

BCHM465 Biochemistry III 3 

BCHM485 Physical Biochemistry 3 

approved bi ol ogi cal sci ence courses 6 

* Specific i nf ormab on about course requi rements can be obtai ned i n the undergraduate off i ce 

* A student who enrolls in thechemistry or biochemistry program at any timet oil owing the first semesterof study typically will enter the non-majors introductory sequence (CHEM 
131/132, 231/232, 241/242 and 271/272; CHEM 132, 232, 242 and 272 are co- requi site laboratory courses) which fulfills the lower-level departmental requirements. Transfer students who 
wi sn to pursue chemi stry or bi ocherri stry maj ors wi 1 1 have thei r previ ous cherri stry course work careful I y eval uated for pi acement i n the appropri ate courses. Starrj ng i n 2007, transfer 
students with four or more semesters of general and organic chemistry credit must take, at a minimum the CHEM 272 laboratory course to complete the introductory sequence 

Advising 

There is mandatory advising for all Chemistry and Biochemistry majors each semester. Advising appointments can be made by contacting the undergraduate office 1206 Chemistry 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 253 



Building, 301-405-1791 

Honors Program 

Students with a GPA of 3.0or better who have completed at I east two semesters of CHEM 399 (Introduction to Chemical Research) have an opportunity to sign up for CH EM 398 (Honors 
Research) in the r senior year and be considered for departmental honors. After successful completion of a senior honors thesis and seminar, graduation with honors or with high 
honors i n chemi stry or bi ochemi stry can be attai ned. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Fraternity is a professional fraternity which recruits men and women students from chemistry, biochemistry, and related science majors during each fall and 
spring semester. The fraternity holds weekly meetings and provides tutoring for students in lower-level chemistry courses. The office is in Room2106A Chemistry Building. Dr. M ichael 
M ontague-Srrith i s the faculty advi sor ( Room 1206 C herri stry B ui I di ng, 301-405- 1791) . 

The student affi Nate programof the American Chemical Society (SA -ACS) is designed to introduce students in chemi stry, biochemistry and related fields to a variety of professional 
activities. Student affi Nates will gai n ski I Is and make contacts airned at launching a successful career in science Activities include networking and meeting with professionals, attending 
national meetings, and parti cipating in public outreach programs. Affi I iates also receive subscriptions to Chemical & Engineering News, the urxiergraduate career magazine/nChem'sfjfy, as 
well as gaining on-line access to announcements regarding job and intern opportunities. The student affi Nate office is located in Room 2112A of theChemstry Building. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Two scholarships are avail able for majors: the Isidore and Annie Adler Scholarship of $500 to an outstanding major with financial need and the Leidy Foundation Scholarships of $500 to 
two outstanding j uni or majors. No appl ication is necessary, as al I majors are automatical ly reviewed by the Awards Committee 

Civil and Environmental Engineering (ENCE) 

A. J ames Clark School of Engineering 

1173 Engineering Classroom Building, 301-405-7758 

www.ceeumd.edu 

Chair: A. Haghani 

Professors M.Aggour, A. Amde, B. Ayyub, G. Baecher, G. Chang, A. Davis, O. Hao, R. McCuen, P. Schonfeld, C. Schwartz, M. Skibniewski, A. Torrents 

Associate Professors: M. Austin, A. Aydilek, K. Brubaker, P. Chang, S. Gabriel, D. Goulias, D. Lovell, E. Miller-Hooks, Y. Zhang 

Assistant Professors: C. Cirillo, Q. Cui, B. Forman (Asst Prof), B. Forman, K. Wigginton, L. Zhang 

Affi Nate Professors: J . Gansler, B. Golden, E. Kalnay, M. Ruth 

Professors Emeriti: P. Albrecht, F. Birkner.J. Colville B. Donaldson, R. Ragan, D. Send ling, Y. Sternberg, D. Vannoy, M. Witczak 

The Major 

TheB.S. degree requires A total of 122 credit hours with emphasis in basic science (mathematics, chemistry, and physics), engineering science (mechanics of materials, statics, and 
dynamics), and basic civil and envi ronmental engineering core courses (computations, materials, fluid mechanics, probability & statistics, and Geographic Information Systems). By the 
Junior year, each student chooses one of three tracks: Geotechnical and Structural Engineering, Environmental arid Water Resources, or Transportation/ Project Management Each track 
specifiesjunior- and senior-level requirements. All three tracks include technical dectives that may be selected from a combination of the six Civil E ngineering special ties and other 
approved courses (The six specialty areas are Environmental, Geotechnical, Project Management, Structural, Transportation, and Water Resources). The curriculum provides a sensible 
bl end of required courses and dectives, permitting students to pursue the r interests without the risk of overspecialization. 

The Bachdor of Science degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abetorg. Ill Market Place Suite 
1050, Bdti more M D 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700. 

Program Objectives 

The mi ssi on of the Department i s threefol d: 

1. Provide a high quality, challenging education that encompasses breadth and depth; and prepare graduates to be proficient in both analysis and synthesis facets of civil 
engineering design; 

2. M ai ntai n a strong research program that is recognized for exed I ence in major areas of civil and envi ronrrental engineering; 

3. Provideservice to the University, the civil engineering profession, and the community at large 

The Department provides an educational programof basic and specialized engineering knowledge necessary for its graduates to be proficient in recognized specialties of civil engineering. 
This preparation provides graduates with the toolsneeded for successful practice in the period foil owing graduation. In addition to general and technical education, the educational program 
stresses professional andefhical responsibilities, an awareness of societal issues, and the need for lifelong learning. 

The Department contri butes to the advancement of knowl edge through research on i mportant engi neeri ng probl ems. The research results are communi cated through recogni zed channd s of 
knowl edge di sserri nati on. 

The Department serves the needs of the community by emphasizing global and societal issues. The Department addresses theseissues through University and professional channdsand 
contri butes to the r sol uti ons. 

The Department, bui I ding upon the above mi ssi on, established three program educational objectives: 

1. Prepare our graduates for competent professional practice within civil engi neeri ng rd ated i ndustries of Maryland and the nid-AtJ antic region. 

2. Create a cadre of graduates with the breadth of interests and skills to take on challenging new areas of engi neeri ng practice 

3. 1 nsti 1 1 i n our graduates a recogni ti on of the i importance of conti nui ng prof essi oral devd opment 
Program Education Objectives 

Thefacultyof the Department of Civil Engineering has established thefollowing Program Educational Objectives: 

• To understand, appl y and devd op fundamental knowl edge i n sci ence technol ogy, engi neeri ng and mathemati cs. 

• To attain advanced qualification in both specialization and breadth. 

< To understand and apply business sensitive criteria in meeting professional responsibilities. 

• To incorporate societal I y sensitive criteria into professional decisions. 

• To devdop forward-thinking attitudes that enhance communication and exemplary practice 

Decisions areto be based on assessments of the quality of our graduates and alumni, feedback from employers of our graduates, andsdf assessment of the faculty and program 
i n meeti ng our obj ecti ves and I eami ng outcomes goal s. 

Admission to the Major 

See the entrance requirements for the A. J ames Clark School of Engineering in the Colleges and Schools section of this site 

Requirements for the Major 

The Department offers a programof study leading to an ABET-accredited Bachdor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE) degree Each student specializes in oneof three tracks: 

I nfrastructure Engineering (Structural and Geotechnical), Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, or Transportation Systems and Project Management. A total of 122 credit hours 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 254 



(123 for the Environmental and Water Resources Track) are required for a BSCE degree with emphasis in basic science (mathematics, chemistry, and physics), engineering science 
(mechanics of materials, statics, and dynamics), basic civil and environmental engineering courses; required courses in the selected track; technical electives; and a senior capstone design 
course The curriculum provides a sensible blend of required courses and electjves, permitting students to pursue their interests without the risk of overspecialization. 



MATH 140 
MATH 141 
CHEM135 

ENES100 

ENES102 
ENGL101 
PHYS161 
ENCE100 







Credits 


Credits 
Second 






Sem 


Calculus 1 




4 




Calculus II 






4 


General Chemistry for Engineers 




3 




Introduction to Engineering Design (**cantefatei first or 


second 


**3 




semester) 








M echani cs 1 (** C an be taken first or second semester) 






**3 


1 ntroduction to Writing 




3 




General Physics 






3 


Introduction to Civil & Environmental Engineering 




1 




General Education Program Requirements 






6 


Total 




14 


16 



Sophomore Year (All Civil & Environmental Encjneering) 

MATH241 Calculus II I 

MATH246 Differential Equationsfor Scientists and Engineers 

PHY S260/261 General Physics 1 1 with Lab 

ENES220 Mechanics 1 1 

ENCE200 Civil Engineering Computation 

ENCE201 Engineering Information Processing 

ENCE215 EngineeringforSustainability 

ENCE305 Fundamentals of Engineering Fluids 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total 



Credits Credits 

Second 
First Sem £»« 

4 

3 

4 

3 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



3 
17 



J uniorYear 

Infrastructure Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
ENES221 Dynamics 

ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE302 Probability and StatisticsforCivil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE340 Fundamentals of Geotechnical Engineering 
E N C E 353 I ntroducti on to Structural A nal ysi s 
ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Electives* 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total 



Credits Credits 
_. ^_ Second 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

15 



3 
3 
15 



Transportation Systems & Engineering Management Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 

ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 3 

ENCE302 ProbabilityandStatisticsforCivil & Environmental Engineers 3 

ENCE320 Engineering Project Management 

ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 3 

ENCE370 I ntroducti on to Transportation Engineering Si Planning 3 

ENCE472 Transportation Engineering 
ENCE Electives* 3 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total 15 



3 
3 
3 
15 



Environmental & Water Resources Engineering Track 
ENGL393 Technical Writing 
BIOE120 Biology for Engineers 
ENCE300 Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 
ENCE302 Probability and StatisticsforCivil & Environmental Engineers 
ENCE310 I ntroduction to Environmental Engineering 
ENCE360 Analysisof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE431 Hydrologic Engineering 
ENCE Breadth Electives* 

General Education Program Requirements 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 255 



Toted 



15 



15 



ENCE320 

ENCE444 

ENCE454 
ENCE441 
ENCE466 
ENCE 



Senior Year 

Infrastructure Engineering Track 

Engineering Proj ect Management 

Experimental Methods in Geotechnical & 

Structural Engineering 

Desi gn of Concrete Structures 

Foundation Design 

Design of Civil Engineering Systems 

Electi ves* 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total 



Credits Credits 

Second 
F.rstScm Sm 



3 
3 

3 
3 6 

3 3 

15 15 



Transportation System; & Engineering Management Track 
ENCE402 Simulation and Design of Experiments for Engineers 
ENCE422 Proj ect Cost Accounting Si Economics 
ENCE423 Proj ect Planning, Scheduling& Control 
ENCE470 Highway Engineering 
ENCE456 Designof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Elecbves* 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total 



3 
3 

6 
3 
15 



3 
3 
3 
15 



Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Track 
ENCE411 Environmental Engineering Science 
ENCE422 Proj ect Cost Accounting & Economics 
ENCE412 Environmental Engineering Unit Operations 
ENCE432 Ground Water Hydrology 
ENCE466+ Designof Civil Engineering Systems 
ENCE Elecbves* 

General Education Program Requirements 

Total 



6 
3 
15 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
15 



Mini mum Degree Requirements: 122 credits and the fulfillment of all departmental, school, and university requirements with a cumulative grade point averageof at least 2.0. Additional 

semester credits will beinvolved to theextent that courses carrying more than three credits are selected. 

+ENCE 466, Designof Civil Engineering Systems, may onl y be taken in the semester in which the student graduates. E 

*ENCE ELECTIVES 

For a// tracts 

-3XX.4XX or 6XX. Atleasttwo must beENCE courses 

- No more than one ENCE 489 

- No more than 3 total ENCE with the same first two numbers 

Breadth E /actives 

Geotechni cal/Structure Track wi 1 1 i ncl ude two el ecti ves from 

ENCE370,402,422,423,470,472 - OR- 
ENCE310,411,412,431,432 

Transportation/Project Management Track will include two deed ves from 

ENCE340, 353, 441, 444, 454 - OR - 
ENCE 310, 411, 412, 431, 432 

E nvi ronmental /Water Resources Track wi 1 1 i ncl ude two el ecti ves from 

ENCE 340, 353, 441, 444, 454- OR - 
ENCE 320, 370, 402, 423, 470, 472 



Advising 
Advising 

All Civil and Environmental Engineering majors are advised by the foil owing department faculty and staff: 

1. Dr. DimitriosGoulias, Head Undergraduate Advisor (0147A Glenn L. Martin Hall, dgoulias@urrd.edu, 301-405-2624). 

Professor Goulias, i) advises juniors and seniorsinthe Geotechnical & Structural Engineering track, and/or Infrastructure track, and ii) addresses key academic and curriculum issues for all 
civil engineering students. 

2. Alan Santos, Director of Undergraduate Student Services, 1173A Glenn L. Martin Hall, asantos@unxl.edu, 301-405-1977. 

Mr. Santos, advises i) all freshmen and sophomore, and ii) juniors and seniors in the Environmental & Water Resource and Transportation/ Project Management Tracks. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Department f acul ty f requenrj y have research opportuni tj es for undergraduate students. Students are encouraged to contact f acul ty members whose research sped al b es are of i nterest For 
further i nf ormab on students are encouraged to contact the Department advi sors. 

Internships 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 256 



Career fairs are organized regularly throughout the academic years by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and the Chi Epsilon student chapters, and the Engineeri ng Co-op & 
Career Services office 

Co-op Programs 

Several excellent co-op opportunities are avalablefor Civil and Environmental Engineering students. See the A. James CI ark School of Engi neering entry in chapter 6 of this catalog for a 
full description of the Engi neering co-op program 

Honors Program 

SeetheA. James Clark School of Engineering Honors Program 
Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

• American Society of Civil Engineers 

• Chi Epsilon Civil Engineering Honor Society (by invitation) 

• Engineers Without Borders 

• ITS Student Chapter 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Department of Civi I and Environmental Engineering awards a number of academic scholarships. These awards are designated primarily for junior and senior students. A department 
committee evaluates applications each year. SeetheSchool of Engi neering web site for information and application instructions. 

Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Civil Engi neering offers the foil owing awards: 1) The Civil Engi neering Outstanding Senior A ward; 2)TheASCE Outstanding Senior Award; 3) The 
Woodward-ClydeConsultantsAward; 4)TheBechtel Award; 5) The Chi Epsilon Outstanding Senior Award; 6) The Ben Dyer Award; 7)TheASCE Maryland SecrjonAward; 8) The 
RobertL. Morris A ward for Environmental Leadership; arxi9)TheDepartm=ntChairman'sAward. 

C lassies (C LAS) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1210MarieMountHall, 301-405-2013 

www.classics.urrd.edu 

ldoherty@urrd.edu (Chair) or gstal@unxl.edu (UG advisor) 

Chair: L. Doherty 

Professors: L. Doherty, J. Hallett (Distinguished Scholar-Teacher), E. Stehle 

Associate Professors: G. Staley (Undergraduate Advisor) 

Lecturers: M . Pittas-Herschbach, J . Woods 

Affiliate Professors: J . B urton 

Affiliate Associate Professors: J. Scholten 

The Major 

Courses offered by this department may be found under the following acronym(s): CLAS, LATN, GREK. 

Classics is the study of ancient Greek and Roman culture in all its aspects. Greek and Roman culture are the foundations of western culture- its literature ideas, art, politics, and 

conceptions of the individual. Greek rnyth is still a shared fund of image and narratives that expresses human experience Latin is the major source of English vocabulary, and Greek 

provides technical language in many fields. CI assies explores all of these aspects through over fifteen hundred years of history. It helps us understand the relationship of western culture to 

other cultural systems and pi ace ourselves better i n the world. 

CI assies is an intellectually rich and versatile liberal arts major which teaches "core skills", including effective communication, critical thinking, and an appreciation of diversity. Because it 

is interdisciplinary and holistic, a student of classics gets a three-dimensional view of cultures and literatures that are still major forces today. Studying Athenian democracy and the Roman 

Republic sharpens understanding of competing philosophical and political ideas. Studying Latin not only develops English vocabulary but makes English grammar comprehensible Both 

languages provide excel lent analytic training; for instance classics students score among the top in the analytic section of theGRE exams. 

Classics is a pre-professional major for I aw school or for graduate school inany aspect of the ancient world. Classics majors have also gone on tolibrary school. Latin teachers are in 

demand; numerous students have found rewardi ng j obs teachi ng secondary school , wi th corrrj nued i nvol verrent i n the cl assi cs communi ty . Others have gone i nto busi ness, worked i n 

educational television, and gotten jobs in the writing or editing fields, inarchival work, inspecial education, orinsocial services. 

Program Objectives 

The program aims to help students to understand and appreciate theGreekand Latin languages and literatures, and their relevance to the modem world. 
Program Learning Outcomes 

Having completed the degree program students should have acquired thefol lowi ng knowledge and ski lis: 

1. Students must demonstrate the abi I i ty to i interpret the cultural context of pri mary sources through a vari ery of methodol ogi cal approaches. 

2. Maj ors who take Larjnand Greek are expected to demonstrate some level of language proficiency. 

• Latin majors must be ableto read and translate Latin at the advanced level . 

• Latin and Greek majors must be ableto read andtranslateeither Latin or Greek at the advanced level and the other language at the interrredi ate level. 

• Classical Humanities majors must be able to demonstrate the ability to assess CI assi cal texts in translation or pri mary evidence through a variety of methodological approaches at the 
advanced level. 

Academic Programs and Depa r t m e nta l Facilities 

The Classics Department has its own Classics library as well as a Classics Club for its undergraduate majors. 

Admission to the Major 

Admission to the major si mply requi res a meeting with the undergraduate advisor. No prior knowledge of Latj n or Greek is requi red. 

Placement in Courses 

Students with score of 4 or 5 in any AP Latin test may not take LATN 201 or lower for credit Students with score of 4 or 5 in more than one AP Latin test may receive additional credit. 
For further i nformati on, contact the departments undergraduate advi sor. PI acement tests may al so be gi ven i n some cases. 

Requirements for the Major 

RequirerrEntsfortheClassics major include the College of A its arxi Humanities requirement of 45 upper-level credits completed. 

The College's Global Engagement Requi rerrent will be automatically fulfil led in the process of taking language courses in the Latin, Greek, and Latin and Greek tracks of the major. 
Studentsinthe Classical Humanities track who elect to study LatinorGreek to the intermediate level (LATN 201orGREK 201) will also satisfy theGlobal Engagement Requirement 

N o course grade below the grade of C- may count toward the maj or. An overall GPA of 2.0 in the major is requi red for graduation. 

Crafts 



7, Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 257 

Option A: Latin 

LATN Courses at the 200/300 level 18 

LATN Courses at tire 400 level or higher 12 

Support! ng courses 9- 12 

Any level CLAS, GREK, or related fields such 
asHISTandARTH 

Option B: Greek 

GREK Courses at the 200/300 level 18 

GREK Courses at the 400 level or higher 12 

Supporting courses 9-12 

Any level CLAS, LATN, or related fields such 
asHISTandARTH 

Option C: Latin and Greek 

LATN Latin courses 18 

GREK Greek courses* 12 

OR 
GREK Greek courses 18 

LATN Latin courses* 12 

AND 
Supporting Courses 9 

For example, CLAS170, HIST 110, anda300- 
or 400-level course in Greek or Roman hi : story 



*Studentswithnoprevioustraining in the second language iray 
count introductory level courses as part of the 22-hour 
requirement 



Option D: Classics inTranslation (Classical 
Humanities) 

/. Foundation Courses - 12 credits at the 100-200 level, at least 6 of which must be in Classics (CLAS courses).* 

*The introductory Latin or Greek sequence (101, 102, and 201), if taken at College Park, fulfil Is this requirement If Latin 120 and 201 are taken at College Park, only one additional 
course at the 100-200 level is required. If no language is taken, four courses in English translation, including at I east two in Classics, are required. Students who are capable of working at a 
higher level may request departmental approval to substitute upper-level courses for some of the i ntroductory credits. 

1 1. Advanced Courses- eight courses at the 300 level or above; of which four must be in Classics and one must be CLAS 409X (capstone semi nar), to betaken inthejunior or senior year. 
As a special exception, either LATN 201 or GREK 201, intermediate Latin or Greek, may be counted as one of the advanced courses. Students are still required to fulfill theARHU 
requirement of 45 300-400 level credits. 

Requirements for the Minor 

No course grade below the grade of C- may count toward the mi nor. An overall GPA of 2.0 i n the minor is required for graduation. 

Classical Mythology 

This minor will introduce students to classical mythology, its uses within ancient Greek and Roman culture, and its subsequent influenceon art and literature The minor requires 15 credits. 

Requi red courses: 

CLAS 170 Greek and Roman Mythology (3) 

CLAS 470 Approaches to Greek Myth (3) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 258 



I n additi on, the student must choose three courses f ram the f ol I owi ng I i st, two of whi ch must be at the 300 or 400 1 a/el: 

CLAS 270 Greek Literature in Translation (3) 

CLAS 271 Roman Literature in Translation (3) 

CLAS320WomeninClassical Antiquity (3) 

CLAS 330 Ancient Greek Religion: Gods, Myths, Temples (3) 

CLAS 331 Ancient Roman Religion: Fromjupitertojesus (3) 

CLAS 370 Classical Myths in America (3) 

CLAS 374 Greek Tragedy inTranslation (3) 

CLAS 419TheClassical Tradition (3) 

Students interested in pursuing this mi nor should consult with the Undergraduate Advisor in the Department of Classics. 

Latin 

This mi nor introduces students to the Latin language and enables them to read, in Latin, important works of Latin literature For students with no prior experienceof Latin, the mi nor 

requi res 21 credits, consi sti ng of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

Latin 101 Elementary Latin I (4) 

Latin 102 Elementary Latin II (4) 

Latin 201 Intermediate Latin (4) 

Latin 3xxTwo reading courses chose from the foil owing: Plautus, Petronius, Ovid or Horace and Catullus (6) 

Latin4xxA reading course in a major Latin author (3) 

Stuclerts who erter with aavarcedstandirg in Latin can conpletette of five courses in Latin at the 200 level and beyond. Students interested inpursuingthisrri nor 

should consult with the Undergraduate Advisor in the Department of Classics. 

Greek 

This rri nor introduces students to ancient Greek and enables them to read, in Greek, important works of Greek literature This rri nor requi res 21 credits, consi sting of the foil owing courses: 

Greek 101 Elementary AncientGreek I (4) 

Greek 102 Elementary AncientGreek II (4) 

Greek 201 Intermediate Ancient Greek (4) 

Greek 301 Scenes from Athenian Life (3) 

Greek 4xx Either Greek Philosophers, Greek Tragedy, or Homer (3) 

A Classics course at trie 300 or 400 level such as CLAS 374 (GreekTragedy) or CLAS 330 (Greek Religion) (3) 

Students interested in pursuing this rri nor should consult with the Undergraduate Advisor in the Department of Classics. 

Advising 

Departmental advising is mandatory for all majors every semester. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Eta Sigma Phi is the national undergraduate Honor Society in Classics founded in 1914 at the University of Chicago. The University of Maryland's chapter, ZetaNu, was established in 
1994. Students are invited to join in the spring semester. To qualify, a student must be registered in a 300- or 400- level Greek or Latin course must have at I east a B+ average in all 
I anguage courses, and an overal I G PA of B or better. 

Students can al so join the A meri can Philological Association, which is the national classics professional organization, and the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, which is our 
regional classical organization. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 

parti ci pates in the award ng of scholarships to deserving students. For informati on, vi3t www.financidaid.urrd.edu . 

The Classics Department annually awards the Avery Prize to a Latin student of special meri t, and the Steyer U ndergraduate Schol arshi p to an outstanding classics concentrator. To honor the 

memory of Sylvia Gerber, who taught Latinfor many years in the Washington, DC public schools, her sonLouis has recently provided the department with funding to support the training 

of Latin teachers and Latin pedagogical studies, including an undergraduate award for an aspiring Latin teacher. 

There are also a varying number (from two to three) of departmental scholarships granted annually to students whose performance and/or conrnitment to Classics is outstanding. 

Awards and Recognition 

Outstandi ng students are invited to join Eta Sigma Phi, the national undergraduate Honor Society in Classics (see Student Societies and Professional Organizations above). 
The department also annually awards the Avery Prizefor excellence in Latin, and the Steyer and Gerber Scholarships (see Scholarships and Financial Assistance above). 

Communication (COMM) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2130 Skinner Building, 301-405-6519 

www.commurrcl.edu 

commadvisi ng@urrd.edu 

Chair: E.Toth 

Director: L. Waks (Director, Senior Lecturer) 

Professors: E. Fink, R. Gaines, J. Klumpp, S. Parry-Giles, T. Parry-Giles, A. Wolvin 

Associate Professors: D. Hample 

Assistant Professors: S. Kharris, B. Liu, M. Liu, K. Maddux, X. Nan, N.Ofulue 

Lecturers: R. Coleman, J. GowinJ. Hoffman, S. Hubbard, W. Lawson, D. Payne S. Sirmn.J.Tenney, R.Toth 

Affiliate Professors: L. AldooryJ. Fahnestock(ENGL), M. GdfEnd(PSYC), A. Kruglanski (PSYC).Y. Peri (Prof & Dir), D. Rosenfdt (WM ST) 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: S. McDanid (KNES) 

Professors Emeriti: J . Grunig, L. Grunig 

Visiting Faculty: K. Kendall (Res Prof, Visit Prof) 

TheMajor 

Communication takes as its subject matter the history, processes, and effects of human communication through speech and its extensions. The departmental curricul um is designed to 
provide a liberal educati on in the arts and sciences of human communication as well as preparation for career opportunities in business, government, education, law, and related fields. 
Students pursue academic programs that emphasize many disciplinary areas, including intercultural communication, political corrmuni cation, public relations, negotiation and conflict 
management, cogni ti on and persuasi on, rhetori cal theory, ri sk communi cati on, hi story of rhetori c, and criticismofpublicdi scourse Departmental advi si ng i s mandatory for new maj ors, 
second semester sophomores, and seni ors. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Upon completion of the degree program in Communication, students should be able to demonstrate the foil owing knowledge and ski I Is: 

1. An ability to distinguish among a variety of theoretical approaches in the communication disci pi ine and use them appropriately and effectively in academi card professional work. 

2. An ability to conduct research and write research reports employing social scientific and/or humanistic approaches in the communi cati on discipline 

3. An ability to argue clearly and effectively in a speech. 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership unites research, education, and public engagement to foster democratic communi cati on by a diverse people See 
www.commcenter.urrd.edu. 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 259 



The Center for Risk Communication Research (CRCR) advances dialogue and understanding about communication's role in controlling and preventing risk; about how publics perceive risk 
communication; and about the political, economic and social contexts for risk communication. Scholars associated with the CRCR examine health, food safety, security, and environmental 
risks. Seewww.commriskcenter.urrd.edu. 

Theclepartn^r*sMediaCenterisclesignedtoprovideone-on-omtiJtDringandiristjixtional support to further students' oral communication skills and confidence The Media Center is 
equi pped wi th cameras and record ng equi prrent to tape speeches and presentati ons for practi ce and critj que 

Admission to the Major 

First-time Freshman 

All fi rst-tjrre freshmen who designate communi cation as a major prior to the end of the final exam period of their first semester will be admitted directly to the program They must sign a 
M emorandum of U nderstandi ng that states that they understand that by the semester in which they attain 45 Univera'ty of Maryl accredits (excludir^ 
Gateway requirements. 

a Complete50% of the general education requirements, including Fundamental Studies requirements in Mathematics and English. 

b. Completeoneof thefollowing courses with agradeofC- or better: BMGT230.CCJS200, EDMS451, PSYC200, SOCY201, STAT100, or equivalent 

c. Complete COM M 107, COM M 200, or COM M 230 with a grade of C- or better 

d. CompleteCOMM250withagradeof C- or better and 

e A GPA of 2.0 or better 

Students may repeat onl y one of the Gateway courses and that may be repeated only once in their attempt to meet the requi rements. Students who f ai I to meet the Gateway requi rements by 
the semester in which they attain 45 credits will be dismissed from the program and cannot reapply. 

Transfer Students 

Internal and external transfer students who meet the Gateway requirements specified above must also haveacumulativeGPA of 2.7 in all college-levd coursework to apply to the program 

Appeals 

All students may appeal admission decisions. Students directly admitted as freshmen, who are dismissed because of failure to meet Gateway requi rements or to be in good academic 
standing at 45 credits, may appeal directiy to the Undergraduate Director in the Department of Communication. All other students who are denied admission may appeal to the university's 
Off i ce of U ndergraduate Adrri ssi ons. 

Requirements for the Major 

The course of study for a Communication major must satisfy all of the foil owing requirements: 



Credits 



COM M 107 


Oral Communication: Principles and Practices, OR 


COM M 200 


Critical Thinking and Speaking, OR 


COM M 230 


Argumentation and Debate 


COM M 250 


1 ntroduction to Communication 1 nquiry 


COMM400 


Research Methods in Corrmuni cation 


COM M 401 


1 nterpreti ng Strategic Discourse 




Completion of one of thefollowing tracks: 




Social InfluenceTrack 


COM M 402 


Communi cation Theory and Process 




Five from 


COM M 420 


Theories of Group Discussion 


COM M 424 


Communication in Complex Organizations 


COM M 425 


N egoti ati on and Conf 1 i ct M anagement 


COM M 426 


Conf 1 i ct M anagement 


COM M 435 


Theories of Interpersonal Communication 


COM M 470 


Listening 


COM M 475 


Persuasion 


COM M 477 


DiscourseAnalysis 


COMM4S2 


1 ntercultural Communications 


COMM 


COMM Elective 


COMM UL 


Upper Levd COMM Elective 




One Statistical Analysis from 


PSYC200 


Statistical Methods in Psychology 


SOCY201 


1 ntroductory Stati sti cs for Sod ol ogy 


BMGT230 


Business Statistics 


EDMS451 


1 ntroductj ontoEducationalStatistics 


STAT100 


Elementary Statistics and Probability 




(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 




One Structural Analysis ofL anguage from 


LING200 


1 ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 


HESP120 


1 ntroduction to Li ngui sties 


ANTH380 


Culture and Discourse 




(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 



3 

15 



3 

3 

3-4 



COURSESXX Courses rdated to Social I nfluence in one department other than COMM 



Communication StudiesTrack 

COMM402 Communication Theory and Process 

One from 
COMM420 Theoriesof Group Discussion 
COMM424 Communication in Complex Organizations 
COMM425 Negotiation and Conflict Management 
COMM 426 Conflict Management 
COMM435 Theoriesof Interpersonal Communication 
COMM470 Listening 
COMM475 Persuasion 
COMM477 DiscourseAnalysis 
COMM4S2 I ntercultural Communications 

One from 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 260 



COM M 330 
COM M 360 
COM M 450 
COM M 451 
COM M 453 
COM M 455 
COMM460 
COM M 451 
COM M 459 
COM M 471 
COM M 476 
COMM 
COM M 300/400 

PSYC200 
SOCY201 
BMGT230 
EDMS451 
STAT100 



LING200 
HESP120 
ANTH380 



COURSESXX 



Argumentation and Public Policy 

The Rhetoric of Black America 

Ancient and Medieval Rhetorical Theory 

Renaissances Modem Rhetoric Theory 

The Power of DiscourseinAmerican Life 

Speechwriting 

Public Lifein American Communities, 1634-1900 

Voi ces of Pub i c L eadershi p i n the Twenti eth Century 

The Discourse of Social Movements 

Publ i c Communi cati on Campai gns 

Language, Communication, and Action 

COMM Elective 

Upper Level COMM Electives 

One Statistical Analysis from 

Statistical Methods in Psychology 

I ntroductory Stati sti cs for Soci ol ogy 

Business Statistics 

I ntroducti ontDEducationalStatistics 

Elementary Statistics and Probability 

(or an equi val ent course - see advi sor) 

One Structural Analysis ofL anguage from 

I ntroductory L i ngui sti cs 

I ntroducti on to Li ngui sties 

Culture and Discourse 

or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 

Courses related to Communi cati on Studies i n one department other than 
COMM 



3 
12 
3-4 



COMM 231 
COMM 232 
COMM 350 
COMM 351 
COMM 352 
COMM 386 

COMM4S3 
COMM 300/400 

PSYC200 
SOCY201 
BMGT230 
EDMS451 
STAT100 

COURSESXX 



COMM 450 

COMM 330 
COMM 360 
COMM 451 
COMM 453 
COMM 455 
COMM460 
COMM 451 
COMM 459 
COMM 471 
COMM 476 
COMM 
COMM 300/400 

AMST432 
CMLT488 
ENGL453 
JWST263 
PHIL233 

LING200 
HESP120 
ANTH380 

COURSESXX 



Public RdationsTrack 

The requirements below are effective for incorring Fall 2008 freshmen and 

transfers admitted to Comrunication. 

News Writing and Reportingfor Public Relations 3 

NewsEditingforPublicRelations 3 

Publ i c Rel ati ons Theory 3 

Publ i c Rel ati ons Techni ques 3 

Specialized Writing in Public Relations 3 

Experiential Learning* 3-6 

* only 3 credits apply to major 

Seni or Seminar in Public Rel ati ons 3 

Upper Level COMM Electives 6 

One Statistical Analysis from 3-4 

Statistical Methods in Psychology 

Introductory Stati sties for Sociology 4 

Business Stati sties 

I ntroducti ontDEducationalStatistics 

Elementary Statistics and Probability 

(or an equivalent course- see advisor) 

CoursesrdatedtoPublicRdatiorEinoriedepartmentotherthanCOMM or Q 

JOUR 

Rhetoric and Political CultureTrack 

Ancient and Medieval Rhetorical Theory 3 

Five from 15 

Argumentation and Public Policy 

The Rhetoric of Black America 

Renaissance& Modem Rhetoric Theory 

The Power of DiscourseinAmerican Life 

Speechwriting 

Public Lifein American Communities, 1634-1900 

Voi ces of Publ i c L eadershi p i n the Twenti eth Century 

The Discourse of Social Movements 

Publ i c Communi cati on Campai gns 

Language, Conmunication, and Action 

COMM Elective 3 

Upper Level COMM Elective 3 

One Critical Analysis of Discourse from 3 

L i terature and A meri can Soci ety 

Genres 

Literary Theory 

Hebrew Bible: Poetry and Prophecy 

Phi I osophy i n L i terature 

OneStructural Analysis of ' Language from 3 

I ntroductory L i ngui srj cs 

I ntroducti on to Li ngui sties 

Culture and Discourse 

or an equi val ent course - see advi sor 

Courses related to Rhetoric and Political Culture in one department other than „ 

COMM 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 261 



Notes 

• B ecause the departments curri cul um changes over rj me, the departments U ndergraduate Di rector may approve other appropri ate Communi catj on courses to meet the requi rements for 
each track, 

• Courses required for theCommunication major, but taken outside COM M, may be used to satisfy general education requirements. 

• Only 3 credits of COM M 386 may apply toward the major. 

• No course grade pel ow the grade of C- may count toward the maj or. 

• An overall GPA of 2.0inthemajorisrequired for graduation. 

Requirements for the Minor 

Rhetoric is the theory of persuasive communication, both written and spoken. The minor in rhetoric has been designed for students who want to know the principles and ski I Is of practical 
persuasion in its varied contexts. The program will be of value for all students wishing to improve their writing and speaking ski I Is and especially useful for those students who pi an 
careers in business, management, law, government, and education. The minor in rhetoric is an interdisciplinary program offered through the cooperation of the Department of English and 
the Department of Communication. 

To make an appoi ntmant to explore or declare a mi nor, go to www.arhu.umd.edi^uridergraduate/academcs/rninors. 

Fifteen se m es ta hours of coursework are required: 

A. Six semester hours from the course list in Rhetorical Theory and Analysis of Discourse 

B. Six semester hours from the course list in Writing [and Speaking Skills 

C. Three semester hours in decrjves from either section of the Rhetoric Course List 

D. At least nine of the fifteen semester hours must at the 300-level or higher (including at least six hours at the University of Maryland, College Park) 

E. N omore than six of the fifteen semester hours may be taken at an institutj on other than the University of Maryland, Col lege Park 

F . N o more than si x of the f i fteen semester hours may count toward the students maj or, support ng courses, and col I ege requi rements 

G . N o course from the students maj or department may count toward the mi nor 

H. No course used to satisfy a Fundamental Studies requirement may count toward the minor 

I . N o course used to sati sty the requi rements of another rri nor may count toward the rhetori c rri nor. 

J . No course grade below the grade of "C-" may count toward the rri nor 
K. An overall GPA of 2.0inthe minor is required for graduation. 

EntEhngiheMincr: 

Students wishing to pursue the rri nor should review the requi rements above, make tentative selections of courses below to sati sfy these requi rements, and meet with one of the advisers 
below. The earliest possible meeting to draft a list of courses is recommended. Students must then official I ydecl are the mi nor in rhetoric. 

CurrentcaurseliSts for theninar in Rhetoric can be found at 

www.communxl.edu/rhetoricmi nor.htrri 

Minor AcMsors 

JamesF. Klumpp „.. . 

Department of Communi catj on JwIf^jfnJc .■ u 

JtT r . ■ „ .... Department of English 

g^S , ldlng 3114TawesHall 

iklumpp@umd.edu . _ __,_, 

301-405^6520 sloqan(aumd.edu 

MX 4U5-b5AJ 301-405-9659 



Advising 

Advising is avail able throughout the year in 2101D Skinner Building. Students should check Testudo for their registration date and for any mandatory advising blocks. Advising questions 
can be sent to commadvi si ng@urrd.edu or you may cal I 301-405-0862 or 301-405-0863. 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

Research experiences include assisting on faculty research projects, participating in special team research projects, and working with the departments Center for Political Communication 
and Civic Leadership and Centerfor Risk Communication Research. 

Internships 

TheclepartmentsinterishipprogramhelpscornrTxinicationrr^orsganprofessional experience, build a professional portfolio, and take the first steps toward a career. The department 
structures its i ntemshi p program around a course, COM M 386: Experiential Learning, offered each school tarn 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program provides students with an opportunity for intensive study of Communication. The program provides participants with opportunities to deepen their understanding of 
the discipline through supervised research with faculty, graduate-level coursework, and involvement in the intellectual life of the department 

Students interested in the Honors Program apply for the program ordinari ly during the second semester of the sophomore year or the first semester of thejunior year. The application is filed 
with the Undergraduate Director. Students should have the following qualifications: 

• An overall GPA of 3.3 or above. 

• Completion of ninesemester hours in Communication including COM M 250. 

• GPA of 3.5 or above in Communication. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

Social and academic activities are avail able to students by parti cipati ng in the foil owing student organizations: the Undergraduate Communi catj on Association, theLambda Pi Eta Honor 
Society, and the M aryland chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America. 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The department offers the J une Dowl er B uteau Schol arshi p to a f reshman student who exhi bits academic excellence 

Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2116 Tawes Hall, 301-405-3839 

www.crritumd.edu 

Chair: K. Cartwright 

Director: Z. Nunes 

Professors: M. Collins (English), R. Harrison (Spanish & Portuguese and English), C. Peterson (English), S. Ray (English), B. Richardson (English), O.Wang (English) 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 262 



Associate Professors: R. Bauer (English), S.J den (Engl ishandjewish Studies), Z. Nunes (English) 

Assistant Professors: O. Gaycken (English), K. Macharia (English), R. Ontiveros (English), S. BalachandranOrihuela (English), G. Passannante (English), V. Valiavitcharska (English) 

Lecturers: E. Robinson (English) 

Professors Emeriti: A. Berlin (Prof Emerita) 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

The Office of Student Financial Aid(OSFA) administers all types of federal, state and institutional financial assistance programs and, in cooperation with other university offices, 
parti ci pates in the awarding of scholarships todeserving students For information, visit: www.financialaid.umd.edu 

Computer Engineering (ENCP) 

A. James Clark School of Engineering 

2426AVWA.V. Williams Building, 301-405-3685 

www.eceurrd.edu 

eceadvise@urrd.edu 

Chair: R. Chellappa (Distinguished Scholar Teacher, InterimChair 

Professors: R. Gomez, Associate Chair, Undergraduate Education, C. Espy-Wilson, Distinguished Scholar Teacher, V. Gligor, Research Prof, E. Abed, T. AntonsenJ. Baras, D. Barbe, 

A. Barg, S. Bhattacharyya, G. Blankenship (Associate Chair, External Relations), M. Dagenais, C. Davis (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), A. Ephrenides, R. Ghodssi.J. Goldhar, N. 

Goldsman, V. Granatstein, P. Ho, A. IliadisJ.JaJa, B.Jacob, J. Kim (Prof Of Practice), P. Krishnaprasad, W. Lawson, W. Levi ne (Res Prof), K. Liu (Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, 

Distinguished Scholar Teacher), A. Makowski, S. Marcus (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), I. Mayergoyz (Distinguished Scholar Teacher), J. Melngailis, H. Milchberg (Distinguished 

Scholar Teacher), K. Nakajima, P. Narayan, R. Newcomb, P. O'Shea (Professor), Y. Oruc, E. Ott (Distinguished University Professor), M. Peckerar, H. Rabin, S. Shamma, M. Shayman, A. 

Tits, S. Ulukus, T. Venkatesan (Res Prof), U. Vishkin, M . Vorontsov (Res Prof), M . Wu 

Associate Professors: P. Abshire, R. Barua, P. Dowd (Res Assoc Prof), M. Franklin, T. Horiuchi, R. La, N. Martins, T. Murphy, A. Papamarcou, G. Qu, C. Si No, J. Simon, A. Srivastava, E. 

Waks, D.Yeung 

Assistant Professors: A. Khaligh(AsstProf),J. Munday (Asst Prof, AffAsst Prof), M. Rotkowitz (Asst Prof ) 

Lecturers: W. Hawkins, P. McAvoy (ResAssoc, Lecturer), B. Mendelsohn 

Aff i Nate Professors: A. Agrawala, J. Aloimonos, S. Anlage, S. Bhattacharjee, L. Davis, M. Fu, M. Harper, A. Harris, J. Hollingsworth, D. Lathrop (Prof, Affiliate Prof), D. O'Leary, R. 

Phaneuf, G. Rubloff, E. Smela, F. Wellstciod 

AffiliateAssociate Professors: I. Appdbaum, M. Cukier, R. Duraiswami, R. Kishek 

AffiliateAssistant Professors: Y. Chen, M. Hicks, P. Kdeher, R. Shekhar 

Professors Emeriti: N. De Claris, L. Davisson, F. Emad, N. Farvardin(Prof, Prof Emeritus), R. Harger, C. Lee, P. LigorrenidesJ. Orioff.J. Pugsley, M. Reiser, M. Rhee, C. Striffler, L. 

Taylor, S. Tretter, K. Zaki 

TheMajor 

The conputer engi neeri rig rraj or combines the strengths of both the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science to prepare students for 
careers i n the computer i ridustry. The program encompasses the study of hardware, software, and systems questi ons that ari se i n the desi gn, devel opment, and appl i cati on of computers and 
embedded systems. Specifically, computer engineering students will have a knowledge of hardware systems (electrical networks, electronics, and VLSI); a knowledge of software systems 
(algorithms, data structures, and operating systems); and a knowledge of how these two domains interact (digital logic, signal and system theory, computer architectural and performance 
analysis). Computer Engineering students will I earn about everything that goes into digital and computing systems, fromsolid state physics to CMOS VLSI design, to computer 
architecture to program-ring, arid from operati ng systems to compi I erand language theory. Courses offered by this department may be found under the foil owing acronym: ENEE andCMSC. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org. Ill Market Place Suite 1050, Baltimore, 
MD 21202-4012, telephone: (410) 347-7700. 

Program Objectives 

Broadly stated, the Program Objectives (PEOs) for the undergraduate major i n computer engineering pertain to the accompl ishments and performance of our students 3-5 years after 

graduati on. These obj ecti ves are deterrri ned i n consul tati on with the vari ous constituenci es of the cornputer engireeringprc^ramarri agreed upon arri approved rjy a conserisus of the 

faculty. 

L Technical Accomplishments 

H ave our graduates establ i sh a reputati on for techni cal experti se and excel I ence among col I eagues and achi eve prof essi onal recogni ti on for thei r work, i n graduate or prof essi onal school 

and/or the technical workforce 

2. Invention, Innovation & Creativity 

Have our graduates utilize their ski I Is and resourcefulness to invent design and realize novel technology; to find creative and innovative solutions to engineering problems; and to identify, 
research and sol ve new techni cal chal I enges i n computer engi neeri ng and rd ated f i el ds 

3. Professional Development 

Have our graduates stay abreast of emerging technologies, continually learn new ski I Is, and actively participate in prof essi onal communities to nourish ever-developing careers. 

4 Professionalism & Citizenship 

Have our graduates embrace cultural, societal, environmental, and ethical issuesintheirworktohelpfulfill their professional responsibilities to themselves, employers, employees, 

co-workers, and the local and global communities. 

5, Communication & Teamwork 

Have our graduates excel on multidisciplinary and multicultural teams, demonstrate leadership, and effectively employ their oral and written communication skills to resolve problems and 

i nf orm, educated and persuade di verse audi ences. 

Program Learning Outcomes 

A comprehensive set of Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) has been derived from the Program Educational Objectives (PEOs). These SLOs comprise the knowledge and skills al I 

Computer Engineering students are expected to possess by the time they graduate so the PEOs can be accompli shed. The SLOs are 

L Broad Foundation 

Ability to apply relevant mathematical, scientific, and basic engineering knowledge 

2. Disciplinary Foundation 

Ability to apply core electrical engineering technical knowledge 

3. Laboratory 

Ability to employ standard experimental techniques to generate and analyze data as well as use state-of-the-art software and instrumentation to solve electrical engineering problems. 

4 Design 

Ability to engage in the creative design process through the integration and application of diverse technical knowl edge and expertise to meet customer needs and address social issues. 

5. Communication Skills 

Ability to communi cate eff ecti vd y both through oral presentati ons and the wri tten word. 

6. Interpersonal Skills 

Ability to interact professionally with others in the workplace, to engage effectivdy in teamwork, and to f uncti on productivdy on multi disciplinary group projects. 

7. Engineering Ethics 

Ability to explain an engineer's responsibilities to employers, society, and the r fd low engineers as wd I as an ability to recognize potential and actual ethical problems, analyze critically 
those si tuati ons, and f ormul ate sound ethi cal deci si ons. 

8. Engineering Society 

Ability to explain the symbioticrdationship between engineering and society specifically, how engi neeri ng artifacts are shaped by and incorporate human values as wd I as the ways in 
whi ch engineering sol uti ons impact society and the larger social obligations this entails for engineers. 

9. L ife-long Learning 

Ski 1 1 s necessary to engage i n I i f e-l ong I earni ng and an understandi ng of the need to conti nual I y expl oi t those ski I Is in refining and updating one's knowledge base 

Educational Opportunities 

I n addition to the Student Learning Outcomes which apply to al I CP students, there exist various other educational opportunities which qualified and motivated students may choose to take 

advantage of . The most i mportant of these i ncl ude 

ID. Research 

Ability to formulate and answer empirical and theoretical questions through participation in undergraduate research projects for interested and qualified students. 

1L Leadership 

Awareness of the need for engineering leaders both within the profession and the larger community, aswdl as some preparation to assume those leadership roles. 

12 Entrepreneurship 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs 



Page 263 



Knowl edge of the technology eritrepreneurshi p process and business ski I Is to be able to work effectively Esemployersof I eeders of technology startup ventures, industrial firms, or 
government. 

Admission to Hie Major 

Admssion requirerrels for tteCorrputer Engineering rnaj^ of Engineering. SeeChapter 6 for the Clark School admission requirements. For 

detai I son the Uni vera ty's requirements and general admission procedures, pleasesee Chapter 1. 

Requirements for the Major 

As in all engineering degrees, the student starts out with a core curriculum in mathematics and basic science Subsequent years of study involve courses covering a balanced mixture of 
hardware software hardware-software trade-offs, and basic modeling techniques used to represent tire computing process. Courses covering algorithms, data structures, digital systems, 
computer organi zati on and archi tecture software and hardware desi gn and testj ng, operati ng systems, and programmi ng I anguages wi 1 1 be i ncl uded. E I ecti ve courses must i ncl ude el ectri cal 
engineeri ng and computer science courses and technical courses outsictetheclepartmertsSlucfenteniitfeamasfacferf 'C-' or higher in all engineering mathematics, and science 
ccursesas\fldlastheprerequisitEsforthesecourses.A sample program is shown below. 



Freshman Year 

General Education** 
CHEM135 General Chemistry for Engineers 
PHYS161 General Physics 
MATH140/141 Calculus I /Calculus 1 1 
CMSC132* Object Oriented Programming 1 1 
ENES100 Intro, to Engineering Design 

Total Credits 



Credits Credits 
First Sem Second Sem 

3 3 



3 
13 



3 
4 
4 

14 



Sophomore Year ++ 





General Education** 




3 


MATH245 


Differential Equations 




3 


CMSC216 


1 ntroduction to Computer Systems 


4 




CMSC250 


Discrete Structure 


4 




CMSC330 


Organization of Programming Languages 




3 


PHYS260/261 


General Physics 1 1 with Lab 


4 




ENEE222 


Elements of Discrete Signal Analysis 




4 


ENEE200** 


Social & Ethical Dimensions of ECE 
Technology 


3 




ENEE205 


Electric Circuits 




4 


ENEE245 


Fund. Digital Circuits & Systems Lab 


2 






Total Credits 


17 


17 



J uniorYear 





General Education** 


3 




CMSC351 


Algorithms 




3 


CMSC412 


Operating Systems 




4 


ENEE303 


Analog and Digital Electronics 


3 




ENEE307 


ElectronicsCircuits Design Lab 


2 




ENEE322 


Signal and SystemTheory 


3 




ENEE324 


Engineering Probability 




3 


ENEE350 


Computer Organization 


3 




ENEE446 


Computer Design 




3 




Total Credits 


14 


13 



Senior Year 

General Education** 3 3 

ELECTIVE Computer Engineering Technical Electives 12 10 

ENGL393 Technical Writing 3 

Total Credits 15 16 



-H-EffectivewiththeFall 2010 freshmen admit class, students will be required 
to f ol I ow the new curri cul um above Students enrol I ed pri or to Fal I 2010 or 
students enrolled in parallel programs at other 2 and 4 year institutions should 
f ol I ow the ol d requi rements. H owever, records wi 1 1 be revi ewed when necessary 
on an individual basis during the phase in/out period, and adjustments made in 
degree requi rements. 
* Students may need to take CM SC 131, Object Oriented Programming I, or the 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 264 



computer science exemption exam before taking CM SC 132. 
** Note: Pleasesee www.4yearplans.umd.eclu 



Technical Elective Requirements 

Effective Spring 2010, all B SC P graduates must distribute the r 22 credits of 
techni cal el ecti ves among the f ol I owi ng course categori es: 

Credits 

CategoryA Mathematics and Basic Science El ecti ves rrinimumof6 

Category B ComputerScienceTheoryandApplicatJons rrinimumof 3 

_ ,,, _. Electrical Engineering Theory and . ,, 

Category C ApMicadms y - mmmjmofS 

Category D Advanced Laboratory rri ni mum of 2 

Category E Capstone Design rrinimumof 3 

Category F General Technical Elecrjves rrinimumof 3 



Please read carehilly, andrrnkea ncteofthefoHowiitgspecial cases and other items 

1. General Technical Electives. They may beany upper-level course (300 level or higher) fromthemath, engineering, andbasicsciencedisciplineswhosecoursesstartwith 
the foil owing prefixes and who do not appear on the I i st of unacceptable courses aval able from the Undergraduate Studies Office: AMSC, BCHM, BIOE, BSCI, CHEM, 
CMSC, ENAE, ENCE, ENCH, ENEE, ENES, ENFP, ENMA, ENME, ENNU, ENRE, MATH, PHYS, and STAT. Students may use upper I evd course (300 1 a/el or higher) 
whose prefix is not given in the list above, assuming they received approval to use such courses and the foil owing conditions are met: (i) a students selects two or more such 
courses which are closely related by a theme ard(ii) the student derronstrates how these courses conplerr^ goals. The most up-to-date list of approved 
and unacceptable courses will always be availablef ram the Undergraduate Studies Office and on the ECE website 

2. Two credits of ENEE 499, Senior Projects in Electrical and Computer Engineering, may be used to satisfy the A dvanced Laboratory requirement subject to approval by the 
faculty supervisor and the Associate Chair. Themaxinximnumberof ENEE499creditethatrrBybeappliedtowardsEE technical dectiverequirementsif five 

3. Additional Capstone Design courses can be used as substitutes for the required Electrical Engineering Theory and Applications course and/or the required Advanced 
Laboratory course, provided one of the foil owing is completed: ENEE 408A, 408B or 408C. 

4. 1 f you have any questj ons on how these requi rements affect your current sd ecti on of techni cal el ecti ves, pi ease contact an advi sor. 

Advising 

All ECE faculty members provide mentoring for undergraduate students and every student is assigned a mentor during their first semester in the major. Additional advising is provided 
by the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Education arid the professional advi sing staff of ECE Undergraduate Studies Office Departmental permission is requi red in order to register for 
all courses in the major. The Departments Undergraduate Studies Office (2429 A.V.Williams Building, 301-405-3685) is the primary point of contact for undergraduates with advi sing 
questi ons, and detai I ed cum cul urn requi rements, regi strati on i nf ormati on, and advi si ng and mentori ng procedures can be on the ECE Undergraduate Advi sing website 

Undergraduate Research Experiences 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is affiliated with more than 40 specialized laboratories, supporting activities including: speech and i mage processi ng, high 
performance systems, mobile computing and multimedia, communication networks, robotics, control systems, neural systems, systems integration, VLSI design and testing, experimental 
software engi neeri ng, serri conductor materi al s and devi ces, photoni cs, f i ber opti cs, i on beam I i thography, real -ti me systems, human- computer i nteracti on, and vi rtual reality. U ndergraduate 
students are encouraged to engage in research at some point during trie r education. Active participation in research not only allows students to apply what they have learned in class, it also 
gives them greater insight into a specific area within ECE and an appreciation for the subtleties and difficulties associated with the production of knowledge and fundamental new 
applications. Research experience also prepares students for the demands of graduate school and the work force Information on participating in undergraduate research can be found atwww.e 
www.eceumd.edu/Academc/Under/advising/ENEE499.html. 

The ECE department al so offers unique summer research i ntemshi p programs. The M aryland Engi neeri ng Research I nternshi p Team program offers research opportunities for top 
undergraduates from across the country i nterested i n usi ng computer engi neeri ng ski 1 1 s and tool s to address i mportant bi osystems appl i catj ons. The Trai ni ng and Research Expert ences i n 
N onl i near Dynarri cs program offers research opportuni ti es for students i nterested i n nonl i near dynarri cs. The students parti ci pate i n cutti ng edge team- based research, techni cal and 
educational seminars, and fidd trips to local industry. 

Internships 

I nformation on internships can be found at www.coop.enq.umd.edu Other internships are advertised through the ECE Department's Office of External Rdations and Office of 
U ndergraduate Studi es. 

Co-op Programs 

Participation in a Cooperative Education Program or internship with private industry or a government agency is strongly encouraged. See the A. James CI ark School of Engineering catalog 
entry for detai Is. 

Honors Program 

The Electrical and Computer Engineering Honors Program is intended to provide a more challenging and rewarding urdergraduateexpmence for students pursuing the baccalaureate in 
Electrical or Computer Engineering. The program requires students to complete honors versions of four junior levd dectrical engineering courses and a research project during the senior 
year. Students completing all program requi rements with a 'B' average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) andacumulatjveGPA of 3.0 for all undergraduate work will havethdr participation noted on 
thdrB.S. diploma. Students with the necessary academic qual if i catj ons are invited to enrol I typically after the completion of the r sophomore year. 

Student Societies and Professional Organizations 

The ECE Department has an active student chapter of the I nstituteof Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). I nformarj on and i nstructi ons for joining can be found on the r website 
(ieeeeceurrri.edu ). Equally active is the Gamma Xi chapter of Eta Kappa Nu honor society which is dedicated to recognizing excd I ence in dectrical and computer engineering. Information 
on eligibility can be obtained by visiting the rwebsite( www.hkn.org/admi n/chapter.asp?ch=113 ). The ECE Undergraduate Student Council (USC) represents theentireECE undergraduate 
student body. The ECE-USC hosts undergraduate social events, provides feedback to the Department andoverseestheECE undergraduate student lounge Formoredetailsvisitthe 
ECE-USC website t/yww.eceumd.edu/eceusc/ ). Additionally, there is also a program for Women in Electrical and Computer Engineering (WECE) and a group cal led the Leaders in ECE, 
who serve as our ambassadors, gi ve i nsi ght to new and prospecti ve students, and participate in departmental events such as our "International Day" when we cdebrate the cultural diversity 
of the students and faculty i n our department 

Scholarships and Financial Assistance 

Several schol arshi ps are adrri nistered through the department and many others through the Clark School of Engi neeri ng. To be considered for these awards, students must submit an 
application by May 1st of each year for the foil owing academic year. For more information visit www.ursp.urrri.edu/scholarshi ps/i ndex.html . 



7. Departments, Majors, and Programs Page 265 



Awards and Recognition 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers the foil owing awards: 1. Outstanding academic performance award presented to a junior for academic excellence; 2. 
Service Award to the graduating senior who has show a commitment of service to fellow students; and 3. Chair's Award for outstanding academic performance to a graduating senior. 

J ob Opportunities 

Computer engineers were primarily responsible for the recent revolutions in the music, telecommuni cations and medical device industries. They remain at the forefront of cutting edge 
developments and innovations in nanotechnology, robotics, and other technologies. Electrical engineers also have wide ranging employment opportunities in other fields including 
electronics, microelectronics, communications and signal processing, power systems, dectrophysics, computer architecture, circuits, and control systems. Specific jobs include developing 
f i ber opti c technol ogy, I asers for bi orredi cal appl i cab ons, software for robots, el ectroni c weapons systems, advanced wi rd ess networks, and neuron- 1 i ke sensors for vari ous appl i cati ons. 

Computer Science (CM SC) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 

1119 A.V. Williams Building, 301-405-2672 

www.cs.umd.edu 

ugrad@cs.urrd.edu 

Chains. Khuller 

Professors: A. AgrawalaJ. Aloi moras, B. Bederson, S. Bhattacharjee, W. Cleavdand, L. Davis, L. Defloriani (on leave), B. Dorr, H. Elman, W. Gasarch.J. Hollingsworth, D.Jacobs, D. 

Mount, D. Nau, D. O'Leary, D. Peri is, A. Porter, W. Pugh,J. Reggia, N. Roussopoulos, S. Salzberg, H. Samet A. Shankar, B. Shndderman, A. Srinivasan, V. Subrahmanian, A.Varshney 

Associate Professors: W. Arbaugh, A. Deshpande, R. DuraiswamiJ. Foster (Assoc Chair), L.Getoor, M. Hajiaghayi, M. Hicks, J. Katz, P. Kdeher, C. Kruskal.A. Merron, M. Pop, J. 

Purrjlo, N. Spring, A. Sussman (Assoc Chair), C. Tseng 

Assistant Professors: H. Corrada Bravo, H. Daurre, C. Kingsford 

Lecturers: F. Emad, E. Golub, L. Herman, M . Hugue, N. Padua-Perez, J . Plane (Senior Lecturer) 

Professors Emeriti: V. Basili, Y. Chu, L. Kanal, R. Miller, J. M inker, G. Stewart (Distinguished University Professor Emeritus), M.Zdkowitz 

TheMajor 

Computer science is the study of computers and computational systems: thdr application, design, devdopment and theory. Principal areas within computer science include artificial 
i ntd I i gence, computer systems, database systems, human factors, numari cal anal ysi s, programrri ng I anguages, software engi neeri ng, and theori es of computi ng. A computer sci enti st i s 
concerned with problem solving. Problems range from abstract questions of what problems can be solved with computers to practical matters such design of computer systems which are 
easy for people to use Computerscientists build computational nnddsof systems including physical phenomena (weather forecasting), human behavior (expert systems, robotics), and 
computer systems themsd ves ( performance eval uati on) . Such modd s often requi re extensi ve numeri c or symbol i c computab on. 

Placement in Courses 

M uch of the knowledge at the early stage of the degree program is cumulative To ensure that transfer and new students start with the appropriate courses, the department offers exemption 
exams for CM SC 131, 132, 216, and 250. Students who have had CS courses prior to starting at Maryland should refer to the undergraduate website for exam dates and contact the 
undergraduate office (ugrad@cs.urrd.edu) to schedule an exam 

Requirements for the Major 

The course of study for a Computer Science major must include all of the foil owing requirements: 

1. A grade of C- or better i n each of the f ol I owi ng courses: 

a. CMSC 131 or a score of 5 on the A versionoftheJAVA Advanced Placement exam, or a score of 4 or 5 on the AB version of theJAVA Advanced Placement 
exam, or an acceptabl e score on the appropri ate Department exempti on exarri nab on taken at the rj me of entry i nto the program 

b. CMSC 132 or acceptabl e score on the appropri ate Department exempti on exarri nation taken at the time of entry i nto the program 

c. CMSC 216 or acceptable score on the appropri ate Department exemption examination taken at the time of entry into the program 

d. C M SC 250 or acceptabl e score on the appropri ate Department exempti on exarri nab on taken at the b me of entry i nto the program 

e. At least 27 credit hours at the 300-400 levds. These must include CMSC 330, CMSC 351, and at least 15 credit hours from the following CMSC courses with 
no more than two courses from a si ngl e category: 

Computer Systems: U p to two of 411, 412, 414, 417 

I nf ormab on Processi ng: 420, one of 421 or 422 or 423 or 424 or 426 or 427 

Software Engi neeri ngyPrograrrning Languages: Up to two of 430, 433, 434,435, 436 

Algorithms and Computation Theory: 451, one of 452 or 456 

Numerical Analysis*: One of 460 or 466. 

*NOts Courses in Nurrerical Analysis require MATH 240 and 241 as additional prerequisites. Students without either of these prerequisites mist 
choose their 15 credit hours from the remaining courses in the other four areas 

2. MATH 140 and 141. A STAT course which has MATH 141 (or a more